Your thoughts... on the learning curve?

Hello everyone, I have just joined and this is my first post.

I am a broadcast cameraman who is branching out further now, putting client’s projects out from the edit to DVD and the web.

By taking on the first project, and wanting to do everything well, I was surprised that there are so many things to study - output from the edit software, choosing DVD software, compression, other parameters, authoring, etc.

Does anyone have comments on the way to approach the learning curve? I can look back now at the first set of results and say to myself ‘not bad’, but to be confident that I was doing everything at top efficiency, could take months of study.

All this to get one DVD out the door. It’s probably a never-ending process, but how to navigate it without spending the rest of my life studying?

G.

[QUOTE=Grant;2292920]Hello everyone, I have just joined and this is my first post.

I am a broadcast cameraman who is branching out further now, putting client’s projects out from the edit to DVD and the web.

By taking on the first project, and wanting to do everything well, I was surprised that there are so many things to study - output from the edit software, choosing DVD software, compression, other parameters, authoring, etc.

Does anyone have comments on the way to approach the learning curve?[/quote] Read a lot first, then try a lot with rewritable media (saves a lot of coasters!). Then try again. Try more. Then try something entirely inappropriate and not standard (overburning, not correct VIDEO_TS setup, etc).

Save some money for things you will eventually break. If you’re playing around with firmware, you will kill a drive. Assume that murhpy (murphy’s law) is always sitting behind you trying to mess around with your tinkering at any time. Accept failures and learn from them.

Remember the processes well. It’ll save you tons of time when there’s an error you are trying to debug.

I can look back now at the first set of results and say to myself ‘not bad’, but to be confident that I was doing everything at top efficiency, could take months of study.
Tell me about it… (though it has its rewards as well :slight_smile: )

All this to get one DVD out the door. It’s probably a never-ending process, but how to navigate it without spending the rest of my life studying?
No matter the subject, you will always spend eternity studying it if you’re interested enough. :slight_smile:

… the thing is, although a fine looking and well organized DVD is the end-goal of a corporate shoot, it is essentially a side activity (my real skill is in shooting and editing). And as much fun as it is seeing the end result, I have no idea how to manage the effort so that it doesn’t just blow out disproportionately.

This speaks to the ‘mission creep’ that is happening to a lot of us small independent operators - it is fun being able to get our arms around the entire production process, but it can be a bit ovewhelming.

There is after all, only so much time available. People like me would benefit from some sort of workflow tutorial, one that could step you through one project, as you migrated video from editing, to compression, to DVD-burn software and to output.

I like the idea of practicing on rewritable media, and this raises some questions too. As far as I can tell (my research was a bit inconclusive), while the -RW media is good for internal use, you get into very murky territory when you attempt to send this out the door to a client, with unknown equipment.

Different question here - but is it generally true that rewritable discs have a lot less useability in the outside world (assuming that the client may wish to view the video DVD in their computer, or in a standalone DVD player, etc)?

Grant.

I am not much into the video/editing side of it, but can help out somewhat on the burning end.

http://forum.digital-digest.com/showthread.php?t=86750

http://forum.digital-digest.com/showthread.php?t=86742

http://forum.digital-digest.com/showthread.php?t=86730

At the end of the following is also single layer burning with ISO. Posts #67 to #74, but please also read Posts #77 & #78.

http://club.cdfreaks.com/f116/dvdfab-5-0-2-2-not-ready-big-league-245636/index3.html

I am sure others will be along with their expertise, there is a lot of experience on this Forum.

You are correct about using RW disks as your final output. It isn’t recommended. You should use good quality blank dvds for the end product. We recommend Verbatim 16x or Taiyo Yuden 8x dvds. If you are in the US, you can find Taiyo Yuden online, at shops like rima.com and supermediastore.com.

It is a little difficult trying to advise you not knowing which tools you are using. Could you give us a list of software you have now?

[QUOTE=Grant;2293099]This speaks to the ‘mission creep’ that is happening to a lot of us small independent operators - it is fun being able to get our arms around the entire production process, but it can be a bit ovewhelming.

There is after all, only so much time available. People like me would benefit from some sort of workflow tutorial, one that could step you through one project, as you migrated video from editing, to compression, to DVD-burn software and to output.[/quote]

Hmm i understand, professionally speaking there are a few products that can do all, like Adobe Premiere Pro. It’ll cost you a pretty penny as well.

I’m not sure wether it’s better to invest in lots of time or in a very good software product. There are tons and tons of tools regarding the dvd schematic, most of them fairly cheap or free, but have a high learning curve.

Different question here - but is it generally true that rewritable discs have a lot less useability in the outside world (assuming that the client may wish to view the video DVD in their computer, or in a standalone DVD player, etc)?
Correct.