Your opinion on ritek cdrs

vbimport

#1

Hi everyone. I just want to generally ask your opinion on ritek cdrs. I’ve checked some of the threads here, but I’m hoping to consolidate a number of opinions thru this thread.

I’m currently using 40x ritek cdrs with light violet coating with ritek brand on it. I’ve used >200 pcs already and I’m doing fine with it so far. I’ve experienced a certain problem in about 5-10cds i think. I sometimes can’t access a file like .avi file because it seems that area is corrupted. My media player would just hang so i have to terminate the application. I don’t think it’s the blank cds fault though. I haven’t experienced that problem for a couple of months anyway. Overall, I still find the ritek cd very good and cheap for my (almost) daily burning consumption.

I’ve recently seen a ritek cdr with yellow coating (with blue fonts of ritek ???) has anyone seen them? are they any good? I still wanted the violet coating so I don’t have to spend so much time for cd tests.

Btw, I’ve seen in several threads that ritek china-made (or was it taiwan-made) is bad. How do you know the land of origins of a CD? The ritek cds i buy are sold per piece or per bundle. No paper sheet/cover comes with the bundle. I know how to check/verify which factory manufactured the cd I really have no way of knowing where it was made.


#2

if u look in the sticky thread at the top of the media forum about cdr media tests, u’ll find some tests done on riteks. from what i gleaned on the few ritek tests on the first page of the thread, it seems like they perform pretty well on nero cd quality test, altho i’m not sure what their C1 error count is (i’ll assume they had no C2 errors). i personally only use fuji TY discs, so i have no recent experience w/ ritek myself.

u might want to do a quality check and scan disc on the cds u’ve burned to see how good the quality actually is. if u have a capable burner, u can also use cd doctor or WSES to check for C1/C2 errors.

also, what makes u say that u “don’t think it’s the blank cds fault” that u can’t access the file? if the cd is unreadable, there’s 3 possible reasons: 1) bad cd, 2) bad burner, 3) bad reading drive, or some combination of the 3.

as for where the cds were made, u can usually look at the label of the spindle (or however u bought it) and it usually says the origin. however, since urs don’t seem to have a label, the only way to find out would possibly be to match ATIP information.


#3

Originally posted by AZImmortal
if u look in the sticky thread at the top of the media forum about cdr media tests, u’ll find some tests done on riteks.

I should have dug deeper in there. :wink: I’ll look for them later.

[B]
from what i gleaned on the few ritek tests on the first page of the thread, it seems like they perform pretty well on nero cd quality test, altho i’m not sure what their C1 error count is (i’ll assume they had no C2 errors). i personally only use fuji TY discs, so i have no recent experience w/ ritek myself.

u might want to do a quality check and scan disc on the cds u’ve burned to see how good the quality actually is. if u have a capable burner, u can also use cd doctor or WSES to check for C1/C2 errors.
[/B]

I’ve tried the cds with nero cd quality test after i’ve read for the first time about it. the results, generally, are pretty good. I’ve encountered some “bad” results but i think that came from the ones with the corruption problem i mentioned earlier.


also, what makes u say that u “don’t think it’s the blank cds fault” that u can’t access the file? if the cd is unreadable, there’s 3 possible reasons: 1) bad cd, 2) bad burner, 3) bad reading drive, or some combination of the 3.

About the corruption thing, I’d like to mention first that the files are not corrupted. I’ve tested the files before I write on the disc. As to the corruption thing, I’m thinking it’s not the cd’s fault and it might be mine. This is due to the fact that most of the time (I haven’t been consistent on my observation on this one) while I was burning data on the cds using Nero, I sometimes watch a video or access some other programs. Not many. maybe just one program or two. So I’ve been thinking that maybe i haven’t been careful. I tried using other speeds ranging from 20x-32x because maybe i was pushing the speed to the limit (40x) even if it’s a 40x speed cd. I might have experienced again the same problem with 32x and I don’t know about others. I think it didn’t really occur. As far as I know, I just keep myself from opening other processes so it won’t disrupt with my burning.


as for where the cds were made, u can usually look at the label of the spindle (or however u bought it) and it usually says the origin. however, since urs don’t seem to have a label, the only way to find out would possibly be to match ATIP information.

And the word I was looking for is LABEL. And yes, the cds I buy don’t have labels, just a light violet coating design. Unlike the Sony, Acers and Mitsubishi CDs I saw. Even with the bundle, it doesn’t have

Has anyone seen and used a ritek cd with yellow coating?
By the way, the 2 main reasons I’m sticking with the violet coating are: 1) I’ve been using them for about a year already (or maybe less), and 2)The light violet (maybe it’s lavender, is the color of this emoticon, :bow: , lavender?) looks better than the yellow/blue color combination :bigsmile: That might be a pathetic reason though. :bigsmile:


#4

Originally posted by Shannelle

Has anyone seen and used a ritek cd with yellow coating?

Hi !

The yellow coating is called Phthalocyanine (tha-lo-cy-a-neen)

ATIP: 97m 15s 17f
Disc Manufacturer: Ritek Co.
Reflective layer: Dye (Short strategy; e.g. Phthalocyanine )
Media type: CD-Recordable
Recording Speeds: min. unknown - max. unknown
nominal Capacity: 702.83MB (79m 59s 74f / LBA: 359849)

There also are Riteks with the other coating Cyanine ( light green, like Taiyo Yuden’s ) and ATIP :

ATIP: 97m 31s 01f
Disc Manufacturer: Ritek Co.
Reflective layer: Dye (Long strategy; e.g. Cyanine , Azo etc.)
Media type: CD-Recordable
Recording Speeds: min. unknown - max. unknown
nominal Capacity: 702.83MB (79m 59s 74f / LBA: 359849)


I’ve never heard of or seen Riteks with the light violet coating. Perhaps you mean those with the AZO dye, like Verbatims have ?

It would be great if you could determine the CDRs’ ATIP and post it here.
A couple of those utilities were mentioned here > [COLOR=indigo]Software to reveal manufacturer

OK, here’s some info about the dyes :[/COLOR]

Differences in dyes

All CD-R discs incorporate a photosensitive dye layer where your data is stored–it’s what gets “burned” when you write to the disc. This layer is where your data or music is stored in the form of “pits” which are oblong areas that are discolored by the writer. These pits are read by the player and ultimately transformed into the “1s” and “0s” that make up your digital information (music and data look the same to the reader). The accuracy of the stored information is directly affected by how this dye reacts. That’s why the dye is so important.

Phthalocyanine

Mitsui’s Patented Phthalocyanine (tha-lo-cy-a-neen) dye has several advantages over others: More responsive to the writing laser so cleaner, better defined pits are created. Longest lifetime of any photosensitive dye More transparent, contributing to Mitsui’s high reflectivity What does this mean for you? Cleaner pits means fewer errors. Higher reflectivity means better compatibility among readers. Longer life…300 years is, for all intents and purposes, forever. (estimated lifetime is 300 years for our gold CD-R and 100 years for our silver)

Cyanine

In general, cyanine dye is the standard; the Orange Book was written based on the original cyanine dye discs from Taiyo Yuden. Most CD-Recorders are optimized for cyanine dye. Cyanine discs are compatible with a wide range of laser powers. Phthalocyanine dye has performed better than cyanine dye in accelerated age testing, and may work better in higher speed recording (which requires higher laser powers.) However, all of these differences aside, it appears that IN MOST CASES, the two types of discs perform in essentially the same ways - it’s at the extremes and in the worst-case scenarios where these differences appear most marked. There are many factors besides the dye composition that determine the quality of a CD-R disc.

Black

Black CD-Rs use cyanine dye.

AZO

The NCC subsidiary of Mitsubishi developed a metallized azo, or metal chelate, dye that is a dark blue color. Use of a silver reflective layer provides an attractive background for a label and combines with the dye to produce an unmistakable blue color when viewed from the readout surface. Azo CD-R discs are also marketed by Verbatim.


#5

AT&T Ritek phthalo works great for me. However Hi-Val cyanine, TDK Black, and Maxell phthalo (all Ritek) usually give me C2 errors! But the Maxells seem to have problems at a certain point, as I recently burned a CD that was about 50 min. and it had a very low C1 error average! I don’t think it is burner specific-I’ve had problems with my LTR-52246S 6S02 and 6S0C, and a friend’s NEC burner (don’t remember model, just know it’s 40x.) Burned at 40x recommended speed. I think I might have even burned at 4x and gotten a few errors! The Maxells I had trouble with were the 50-pack 700MB (that Best Buy sometimes has on sale in rebate deals.) BTW, the AT&T 50-packs are on sale at Best Buy for $15-$14 in rebates=about $1 after rebate (plus tax.) Beware, since some are CMCs, so don’t get ones with the “tall” edges on the spindle.


#6

About the corruption thing, I’d like to mention first that the files are not corrupted. I’ve tested the files before I write on the disc.

i know, i was referring to the data becoming corrupt on the cd. :wink:

about running processes while the cd’s burning, i don’t think it should have any real effect on the burn as long as the buffer underrun protection is working properly (this is exactly what buffer underrun protection is designed to do). it might extend the burn time if the buffer starts running low, but other than that, there shouldn’t be any additional problems as far as i know. i’ve decompressed large files from archives before while burning, and the resulting cd didn’t seem to have any problems. maybe i’ll do it again just to confirm. :bigsmile:


#7

Originally posted by BoSkin
[B]Hi !
I’ve never heard of or seen Riteks with the light violet coating. Perhaps you mean those with the AZO dye, like Verbatims have ?

It would be great if you could determine the CDRs’ ATIP and post it here.
A couple of those utilities were mentioned here > [COLOR=indigo]Software to reveal manufacturer

Hhmm, i think I have to clarify something. The coating I was talking about is not the dye. Its… the cd label(?) The dye color of the Ritek CDs (with the lavender label coating) I’m fond of using is of silver platinum. I think I need to double check if indeed it’s silver platinum but I do remember seeing that the yellow label coating of the new cd is silver platinum. So maybe they’re about the same just different “packaging”. I do wonder though if anyone here have tried using the cds i’m using.

I’ll post later the ATIP of the CD I’m currently using.


#8

Originally posted by Shannelle

The coating I was talking about is not the dye. Its… the cd label(?)

My gosh, you were talking about the printable coating. LOL.

Well, if I understood you correctly, the ATIP then must be : 97m 15s 17f


#9

Before 8x burning times Ritek cdrs where the worst! Really crappy.

Now they make better than average cdrs generally. But the thing is they have many factories and the quality varies a bit from one to another. If you find Ritek cdrs from good factories they are really good. I like Ritek type 7 Pthalocyanine they made for philips(maybe they do now as well,i dont know since i have stuck with TY very lately).


#10

Originally posted by BoSkin

[COLOR=darkblue]My gosh, you were talking about the printable coating. LOL.

I’m really sorry about that. :bow:

You can say, I lost my words :bigsmile:


Well, if I understood you correctly, the ATIP then must be : 97m 15s 17f

What’s with the ATIP? I thought that’s just the total capacity of a blank CDR. Does that differ from each 700 CDR’s? I normally focused on manufacturer and dye info and then I read the CDRFaq site that they’re quite next to useless.

Will all ritek manufactured CDs contain that ATIP info you mentioned?

Btw, the silver platinum dye color seems to pertain to an advanced form (or is it a type) of PhthaloCyanine.


#11

the ATIP provides all of the info about a cdr that BoSkin pasted, like this:

ATIP: 97m 15s 17f
Disc Manufacturer: Ritek Co.
Reflective layer: Dye (Short strategy; e.g. Phthalocyanine )
Media type: CD-Recordable
Recording Speeds: min. unknown - max. unknown
nominal Capacity: 702.83MB (79m 59s 74f / LBA: 359849)

the nominal capacity is just one of the components. it’s true that the ATIP info can be “faked,” but the general concensus is that good/reputable makers have no incentive to let their cds be imitated.


#12

Originally posted by Shannelle

What’s with the ATIP? I thought that’s just the total capacity of a blank CDR.

Does that differ from each 700 CDR’s?

I normally focused on manufacturer and dye info and then I read the CDRFaq site that they’re quite next to useless.

Will all ritek manufactured CDs contain that ATIP info you mentioned?

What is ATIP ? < click

Well, here’s some examples :

Nero CD Speed > Extra > Disc Info :

Manufacturer : Taiyo Yuden
Code : 97m24s01f
Disc Type : CD-R
Usage : General
Recording Layer : Dye Type 1: Long Strategy (Cyanine, AZO)
Recording Speed : n/a
Capacity : 79:59.72 703 MB
Additional Capacity : n/a
Overburn Capacity : 83:50.05 (736 MB)


Manufacturer : Ritek
Code : 97m15s17f
Disc Type : CD-R
Usage : General
Recording Layer : Dye Type 7: Short Strategy (Phthalocyanine)
Recording Speed : n/a
Capacity : 79:59.74 703 MB
Additional Capacity : n/a
Overburn Capacity : 81:27.59 ( 720 MB )


Manufacturer : SKC
Code : 97m26s24f
Disc Type : CD-R
Usage : General
Recording Layer : Dye Type 4: Long Strategy (Cyanine, AZO)
Recording Speed : n/a
Capacity : 79:59.74 703 MB
Additional Capacity : n/a
Overburn Capacity : 83:21.48 (732 MB)

Ritek manufactured CDs ( w ATIP-Code: 97m15s17f ) < click


#13

The ATIP of my Ritek-branded CD is 97m15s17f .

BoSkin, thanks for the list of 97m15s17f ritek-made cds.

Never thought of ATIP that important.

By the way, I saw on the sticky thread (for media test) two different ATIP in 2 ritek-made CDs. I assume that the 97m15s17f is the common one and both CDs with different ATIP (from the sticky thread) seem to have good reviews so far but any feedback or opinion on the difference of the two? Or they’re just virtually the same?

Boskin, what version of NeroCDSpeed are you using? I don’t ever see the overburning capacity of my CDs or maybe I just never noticed it. I’ll check it again later :slight_smile:

To everyone: thank you very much for the info you shared.


#14

Originally posted by Shannelle

By the way, I saw on the sticky thread (for media test) two different ATIP in 2 ritek-made CDs.

BoSkin, what version of NeroCDSpeed are you using?

Yes, the other one is with the Cyanine Dye.
You could also see it in this particular thread :wink: :

ATIP: 97m 31s 01f
Disc Manufacturer: Ritek Co.
Reflective layer: Dye (Long strategy; e.g. Cyanine , Azo etc.)
Media type: CD-Recordable
Recording Speeds: min. unknown - max. unknown
nominal Capacity: 702.83MB (79m 59s 74f / LBA: 359849)

Although the Phthalocyanine dye is more spread and common.

As for the 2nd Q, I use this version > [COLOR=indigo]NeroCDSpeed_102.zip < click to download it.

[/COLOR]