WSES guide - read carefully before using WSES

Yesterday, 07th Aug, 2002 [note: was 2003…], the 3rd person on this forum managed to damage a LiteOn writer beyond repair using WSES not carefully enough.

That’s why I now, 01:15-02:10 in the morning, write this guide about how to use WSES, and how not to use it.

Why WSES?

WSES does not only allow scanning for C2 errors, as Nero CD Speed -> ScanDisc does, it even allows scanning for C1 errors. Therefore, it offers a much more precise way to check the writing quality (or being more precise: the readability) of a CD.

Most functions of WSES will only work with LiteOn writers. According to idiot@ace, the drive exercise -> read c1/c2 count" will only work with Asus writers.
Please read the whole thread. idiot@ace explained some of the other tests.

C1 and C2 errors are not really on a CD. They occur during reading. The more difficult it is for a drive to read a disc, the more errors occur while reading that disc. A good disc should report low error rates even at high scanning speeds. A C2 error occurs if too many C1 errors occur to be corrected on “C1-level”.
But don’t forget that a bad disc can also have low error rates after burning, and a very durable, UV resistant disc might have higher error rates than a bad disc, if your writer simply dislikes certain types of media. A LiteOn 40x e.g. won’t write to Mitsui media, although it is high quality media.

A good disc will not increase error rates if you put it into direct sunlight, while a bad disc will suffer damage then and/or may degrade after some months.

Therefore you should be very carefully if you try to conclude the quality of a disc only from such scans here: For a fresh-burned disc, such a scan will only show if the burn was done properly or not. To test the quality of a disc, you must do further test.

If you got WSES.zip, extract it to a folder which can be easily accessed from MS-DOS! Therefore, you must extract it to a drive with a FAT16 or FAT32-filesystem, but not NTFS! You should not use paths such as
“h:\windows2000\programs\burning+scanning ools\liteon\wses” either. This would only cause headache when accessing from MS-DOS.

How to use WSES?

Now boot MS-DOS. You can also use Windows 98 -> dos prompt mode or the Windows 98 boot CD.
WSES will not work in a ms-dos window of any version of Windows.
Do NOT load any CD-ROM drivers!

There is a program called “ST” included in the package. After booting MS-DOS, select the directory of WSES.
on my pc, it is c:\wses, so i type
c:
cd\wses
Now i’m in the directory of wses.
Then, type
ST /O:PCX

From now on, you can make a screen shot whenever you want pressing ctrl+alt+t. The file will be stored in PCX-format and will be named WSES01.PCX, WSES02.PCX etc.

Now type
WSES
You will get this:

First, you will have to select your drive in the setup-menu. Make sure you select a LiteOn writer.

Do NEVER ever, under no circumstances, execute the CLEAR EEPROM command from the Utility-Menu:

You will have a hard time to repair it!

Now it’s time to start the first C1 scan:
Select “Disc Measurement” -> “C1/C2 Measurement”

You can select the range to scan (from start min : start sec : start frame till end min : end sec : end frame, where 1 second has 75 frames => set end min to 74, 80, 90, 99 or whetever type of disc you want to scan), the scale of the picture (set C1 scale to 50 and C2 scale to 20 for a good disc), and the read speed. A read speed of 48x might lead to crap results. So do not go over 40x here.
Note that you must eject and reinsert the CD if you want to scan the same CD twice.

If your graph runs out off the scale, then let WSES finish its task, then press ESC and choose:
Disc Measurement -> Display results:

This one allows you to show your latest scan with a different scale. Just enter your new scale and press “run test”. The CD will not be rescanned, only the graph will be rebuilt.

To give some examples: This is a graph of a good disc (Taiyo Yuden 24x).

while this is a bad burn:

Known bug:
If you scan a disc that has been overburned so far that the leadout has not been written completely, WSES will not be able to scan the disc till its end properly

Very helpful! :slight_smile:

Thanks, alexnoe.

now I just need to find WSES.

Anyone here has a link to download it?

We may not offer it for public download…sorry.

Great job alex! Even I might try it sometime now! :slight_smile:

great guide… :smiley: :smiley: :smiley: :smiley:

why we should use PCX format ??? because i use the BMP format.

is it to reduce the file size ???

the BMP files it creates are obviously defective. You can open them with PicturePublisher, but not with Windows-Paint.

Thanks alexnoe! I think we can use these tests for some of our reviews :wink:

Alex, you state “do not load CD drivers”. I have always loaded the Win98 Cd drivers and have not had a trouble because of it. in fact, I though I was supposed to, but don’t remember where I read that…
Also, not to belabor an old point, I scan at full speed, (99), and the good discs do not indicate any more errors than they do at 40x or lower read speeds. However the marginal discs sometimes look good at 40x but not at 48x (99). so i continue to scan at full speed as I feel that this separates the very best discs. Just as I expect CDSpeed to run at full speed al the way through a disc to be considered a good scan. Just my own opinion and preference, I have no tolerance for marginal discs.

Usually, these drivers should not hurt. But I can’t give any warranty that they do not interfere with WSES.

WSES sends low-level commands directly to the ATA/PI-Controller. It doesn’t need any driver, and neither does it use any driver if present. But a driver might get sour about this and then might cause malfunctions. I use “might cause” because it is unlikely, but not impossible.

Originally posted by alexnoe
We may not offer it for public download…sorry.

but you can surely email it…

People… just ask Alex and co will get you the package…

BTW: very good job on the guide. Part II should include the use of other tests… (RF/Gamma, BETA, etc.) Also there are new versions of this which can measure more stuff, and we are looking for a way to grab it.

Since I have absolutely no idea what “BETA”, “ATER” (perhaps ?? error rate?), or “RF/Gamma” is, I didn’t write it into the guide (the last time i clicked something in this program which i didn’t know, it was the clear eeprom function).

You’re welcome to explain these tests.

What I want in the next version of WSES, is not “C1/C2”, but “E11, E12, E13, E21, E22, E32”…

I notice that in the utility menu, there are “Read EEPROM and Write EEPROM” funtions in addition to the clear. Has anybody tried read and/or write? I’m curious if using the Read EEPROM would allow you to save out the contents in the same manner as MTKFLASH lets you save your current firmware. Then, possibly, you could use the saved file to Write EEPROM and recover a drive that had had the EEPROM cleared? (I have a 32123s drive that is still within the exchange/refund period. If I had WSES I might even be tempted to try it). Or has somebody already tried this and found that it does not work?

I’m thinking that maybe this EEPROM is somewhat similar to CMOS settings on a motherboard BIOS but there is no setup program for it. Since I’ve read that a drive with clear EEPROM can read but not write, I’m guessing maybe it contains writing information tables (maybe Smart-Burn definitions?). The next question then (assuming I’ve guessed correctly) would be is the EEPROM dependent on firmware version, or maybe even specific to the individual drive, determined during manufacture and written for the drive’s particular laser characteristics? And if so, would writing EEPROM contents from another drive possibly restore at least some write functionality to a cleared drive?

Also, if somebody out there has a drive that they cleared and can get me a copy of the utility, I would be willing to try reading the EEPROM on one of my drives to see if I can provide a file that would revive the dead drive. (I currently have 2 32123s and 1 40125s, the 40125s is currently a 48125w vs06 but I should be able to set it up as anything from 32125 on up.)

I’m curious if using the Read EEPROM would allow you to save out the contents

It doesn’t. If you execute this command, you’ll simply get a massage “read 1024 bytes”. No file :a

And if so, would writing EEPROM contents from another drive possibly restore at least some write functionality to a cleared drive?

Since WSES does neither allow to store the EEPROM into a file nor to copy a file into EEPROM, it doesn’t really matter if this would work or not… :a maybe newer versions of WSES allow this.

Originally posted by alexnoe
[B]Since I have absolutely no idea what “BETA”, “ATER” (perhaps ?? error rate?), or “RF/Gamma” is, I didn’t write it into the guide (the last time i clicked something in this program which i didn’t know, it was the clear eeprom function).

You’re welcome to explain these tests.

What I want in the next version of WSES, is not “C1/C2”, but “E11, E12, E13, E21, E22, E32”… [/B]

For E11 and such you probabily have to get a professional tester. Or a program that works with oak’s cdrw chipset.

ATER -> ATIP error rate. This refers to the pre-groove quality of the un-recorded disc. (this is the only test that needs to be run on a blank)

RF/Gamma -> also called Rtop is the reflectance of 785nm light on the land area. Or the max reflectance of 785nm light on the recrded disc.

BETA -> similar to Asymmetry

Thanks alexnoe, there’s no way I would’ve figured all that out on my own.

Also try

main->
drive excercise->
read/err rate->
read c1/c2 count->
enter

with 40X as read speed.

good discs should have an average of only 1 or 0 (integer precision)

In my experience

TY (that’s branded) gets 0
Mitsui (MIT type) silver gets 1
Ricoh (MIT 12X) gets 1

Yesterday, 07th Aug, 2003, the 3rd person on this forum managed to kill a LiteOn writer beyond repair using WSES not carefully enough.

Strange, it’s still the year 2002 on my calendar here… :wink:

That’s why I now, 01:15-02:10 in the morning, write this guide about how to use WSES, and how not to use it.

That’s probably the reason why…

Seriously speaking, does this WSES work on any LiteOn CDRW drives and including LiteON DVD-ROM drives like the LTD-163/165H? (btw, may I know how I can get a copy of this WSES?)

WSES will only work with LiteOn writers. I have not seen a similar tool for any other drive.

I tried drive exercise -> read c1/c2 count, but I get “Q code error”, and after 1000 errors it aborts and reports “too many errors”…test drive was 32123S@XS0X, I’ll try 40125W tomorrow.