Would Alcohol/BW/CCD/DJ work cross-platform?

I really appreciate the resources here at CD Freaks, and the enormous amount of information compiled here has really made me appreciate my Mac games more (although they come out later and are more expensive than my PC games). Fortunately, most of the (limited) number of games that get ported to Macs don’t have copy protection yet. For instance, making a backup of War3:FT required no special steps to backup or run on my Mac (of course the hybrid disc I burned was unplayable on my PC).

However, the caveat is that if Mac game publishers do start using copy protection, I’ll probably be screwed since there aren’t such great programs as Alcohol/DJ/BW/CCD/etc. available for Macs. Are copy protection schemes implemented differently on different platforms/filesystems (Mac’s HFS+ vs. PC’s FAT32/NTFS), or could I just copy my Mac games with my PCs using Alcohol/DJ/BW/CCD (since they’re reading in RAW mode anyway)?

Originally posted by ICCAFSN
Are copy protection schemes implemented differently on different platforms/filesystems (Mac’s HFS+ vs. PC’s FAT32/NTFS), or could I just copy my Mac games with my PCs using Alcohol/DJ/BW/CCD (since they’re reading in RAW mode anyway)?

Well, I can’t say I have any experience with Macs but it seems to me that the methods of copy protection used, if any, for Mac O/S will be the same or similar to those use for PC O/S.

Most, if not all, copy protection schemes involve something to do with the physical structure of the cd; bad and weak sectors for safedisc, sub-channel data for older versions of securom, sector density for newer versions of securom and starforce, gross consecutive errors for laserlock and ring protech, etc.

They don’t relate to the O/S as such. What’s more, given the limited number of games ported to and released for Mac, it’s highly unlikely that anyone will bother to spend the r & d time necessary to develop a protection specifically for Mac O/S (indeed, no doubt, this is the reason most Mac ports are unprotected since it would require some programming time and cost to modify the guard module and it just isn’t worth it for the limited Mac market).

Accordingly, if you do run into a copy protected Mac port, assuming that you’re able to identify the protection used and if your hardware is capable of handling that protection for PC games, there’s no reason why you won’t be able to produce a working (on your Mac) copy of the game with your PC using a suitable duplicating program. As you yourself have noted, raw means raw.