Wondering about buffer overruns, errors etc

Hi,

I posted this on the newbie thread, but after 20 + looks I got no relpies, so I thought I would drop it off here and see if I do any better.

In Windows 98; burning CDs was a very easy task and buffer overruns were rarely or never even heard of. Once Win XP came out; the older burning software wouldn’t work anymore and newer programs for the purpose of burning CDs had to be installed and used instead. This is about when buffer overruns became the main excuse given for problems related to burning CDs.

The advice given on many support sites is to shut down one’s anti-virus software etc., try using a different burning media or reinstall your CD burning programs. None of these things seem to make any sense, because nobody had to do all this in Windows 98.

More thoughts and info regarding CD burning problems;

One thing I haven’t found any information on is that certain sound files themselves just won’t burn to CD. They (mp3 & wav) play fine on the computer, but for some reason the CD burner or software will register errors whenever one attempts to burn it to a CD.

Most people burn more than one file at a time, so they never notice that it may be only one file that is causing them to make all of those drink coasters.

I did an experiment using a CD-RW to eliminate making drink coasters…

I attempted to burn 10 music files at once and got an error just as the writing process was almost over.

I erased the CD-RW and began the process of burning one file at a time, finalizing the session, but not the whole disk. I finally got to the problem file, which helped me to figure out which one it was.

I then re-erased the CD-RW and burned the whole group of files, minus the problem one and it all turned out fine. I did a few more experiments like this and found that sometimes there can be more than one problem file in a group.

I’m curious if anyone is aware of this fact and or knows why this happens? I can’t seem to find any real info on this and it seems it’s all being blamed on buffer overruns when it’s obvious that this just isn’t true.

It would be great if there were some sound file testing software that could detect a problem in a file before one attempted to burn it and make another drink coaster.

Anyway; any opinions and or ideas?

Thanks!

In Windows 98; burning CDs was a very easy task and buffer overruns were rarely or never even heard of.

Buffer overruns? Probably you mean Buffer Underruns, don’t you? I think the influence of the used OS itself is only secondary. It more depends on the actual used caching technique, the transfer mode (PIO/DMA) and the overall source drive performance. But even if buffer underruns occur, it should be no real problem with current burners (thanks to BurnProof,
JustLink, Seamless-Link, etc.).

They (mp3 & wav) play fine on the computer, but for some reason the CD burner or software will register errors whenever one attempts to burn it to a CD.

Then the used mp3 decoder or wave parser of the recording software doesn’t handle the input correctly. The burner itself has nothing to do with that stuff.
BTW: Wave files can’t be erroneous, at all. The only part which could contain errors is the header. The rest is interpreted, recorded and played back as it is. There is no CRC and no method to test the integrity. That’s why the advantages of lossless audio formats aren’t related to the filesizes only.

I erased the CD-RW and began the process of burning one file at a time, finalizing the session, but not the whole disk. I finally got to the problem file, which helped me to figure out which one it was.

Quite laborious. Why don’t you create an image file first - before recording?
This way, you should be able to locate the “picky” files also - without the need to “wear out” your CD-RW.

Your post is pretty general. Maybe you could name the software, writer, etc. you use …?

Hello little-endian, thanks for the reply.

Quote; “Buffer overruns? Probably you mean Buffer Underruns, don’t you?”

No, not really; Take your pick;

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=CD+BURN+BUFFER+OVERRUN&btnG=Google+Search

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=CD+BURN+BUFFER+undeRRUN&btnG=Google+Search

It seems that some call it one thing and others call it another. Even some of the help files in the different software packages I have used call it one thing or another, so for now; what it is called is of little relevance as far as I’m concerned.

Quote; “Then the used mp3 decoder or wave parser of the recording software doesn’t handle the input correctly.”

I thought of that and used a number of different software programs to rip the same problem files from the audio CDs they originated on and there was no difference, still got the errors.

Quote; “Quite laborious. Why don’t you create an image file first - before recording?”

Yes; it could be seen as being quite laborious if one assumes that I am using large sized sound files for my tests. The sound files I am using are basically 50s and 60s songs, which when played are just under 2 minutes in length, so as mp3 and wav files they are quite small and take mere seconds to process. I’m also not worried about wearing out a CD-RW disk, I have plenty of them at my disposal.

As for the image file creation; that was one of the first things I did and strangely enough it worked fine, no problems doing that at all, until it came to actually burning the image, so I decided to skip the redundant parts of the test and concentrate on the actual burning process since that is where the problem occurs.

Quote; “Your post is pretty general. Maybe you could name the software, writer, etc. you use …?”

You are correct, this is a pretty general problem, that many people, with all sorts of different software and hardware have talked to me about, so I saw no point in naming any particular software, writer, etc.

I have used a number of common CD burning software packages, from Roxio to Nero etc., a number of different CD burner models, (belonging to friends), different computers and the results were all exactly the same, unless I did them on a machine with the Windows 98 operating system and then there were no problems whatsoever.

I was just wondering if anyone else, outside of the people I know have had the same things happen and what they did about it.

Again;

Thanks for your reply.

I apologize if I am in the wrong forum, but I am using Sonic Foundry Vegas Video 3.0 to create 30 recordings for our Sunday broadcast. Up until yesterday things were working fine, but now I too am producing coasters. I am running XP on both, laptop and desktop, which produce the same results. I need to understand what to do, please help.

Bob