WLAN Mac Address

vbimport

#1

Hello guys,
Recently I found this great program (MAC Address Changer 1.0)
that allowed my friends to change their wireless network cards’ MAC Address. I even successfully changed my PC’s LAN card’s MAC.
The problem is that when trying to change Toshiba SATELLITE L500-1EQ’s WLAN MAC it just won’t do it. The program says it was successfully changed but it remains exactly the same. What could be the problem?


#2

IDK what the problem is, however I’d like to know why you’d want to/need to change your MAC address?


#3

I’d bet it’s about concealing your identity when you are making illegal downloads off some buisness who doesn’t secure their wireless…

AD


#4

I need it for my student’s Wi-Fi to at least save some of my expenses for tuition but never mind.


#5

a different MAC adress won’t do a thing.

Changing your MAC adress will have no effect on your cost.
unless that change is incidental to some other change.

However I’ve found that some Wireless connections
"discovered" by my 18month old Dell 15-series notebook as "Secured"
are automatically connected to as “unsequred” by some of my older laptops
as their older (other letter) 811 WiFi cards seem to slip past some security.

AD


#6

I have this problem as well. And since the “why” is necessary to get someone to tell how to fix, here it is:
Dell 1397 wireless card (broadcom) has a MAC that begins with C4. As I hope you know, (I didn’t) almost all MAC addresses start with 00. Unfortunately, the AP I have only allows MAC addresses with 00 for the first octet. Since I use MAC filtering this is a problem. Every method to change the MAC fails unless I change the first octet to 02. Then it will accept the new MAC and actually uses it when I run ipconfig /all. Is there a way to force it to take 00?


#7

[QUOTE=madhulk;2549056]I need it for my student’s Wi-Fi to at least save some of my expenses for tuition but never mind.[/QUOTE]
I doubt the agreeement you have with the wireless network operator allows you to try and circumvent the connection in order to reduce costs.


#8

[QUOTE=BretShooter;2562759]Dell 1397 wireless card (broadcom) has a MAC that begins with C4. As I hope you know, (I didn’t) almost all MAC addresses start with 00. Unfortunately, the AP I have only allows MAC addresses with 00 for the first octet. [/QUOTE]

I’ve seen this issue with Netgear routers/APs, where I tried setting up static IP assignment in DHCP to a MAC and if the MAC did not start with ‘00’, it would say “Invalid MAC address!”.

As far as I’m aware of, one of the main reasons Wi-Fi manufacturers prevent forging the MAC address is due to abuse of this capability, such as doing this to get around MAC filtering or to hijack someone’s Internet connection at a public pay Wi-Fi spot, where the provider uses the customer’s MAC addresses to identify who has paid for access.

Here are some suggestions worth trying:

[ul]
[li]Try finding another Wi-Fi driver such as an older version in a hope that an earlier version doesn’t have this restriction.[/li][li]See if you can get a firmware update for your AP that supports changing the first octet to a non-zero value. For the Netgear router I had issues with, an unofficial firmware gets around the issue as someone modified it to bypass the ‘00’ check.[/li][li]Consider using better security on the Wi-Fi, e.g. using WPA2 encryption and only letting those you trust have access to it. If someone manages to get around the encryption, MAC filtering is not going to prevent the hacker gaining access.[/li][li]Replace the Wi-Fi Access Point. If you’re using just an AP (not a combination router/AP or DSL AP), a plain Wi-Fi AP is relatively cheap to buy, especially if you’re using an 802.11g model. Some stores are selling out ‘g’ models to make way for the newer ‘n’ APs and routers. Just avoid Netgear or the brand you’re using to reduce the risk of ending up with another with the ‘00’ first octet issue.[/li][li]Alternatively, replace your Wi-Fi adapter. The internal adapter on most Dell laptops can be easily changed - just make sure the new one matches the interface type of the one installed (e.g. MiniPCI). Alternatively use an external USB Wi-Fi adapter. I’ve seen some USB Wi-Fi adapters have the MAC address printed on the cover of the retail packaging, so look out for this to make sure the new adapter has a MAC that starts with ‘00’.[/li][/ul]


#9

I tried the earlier version of firmware (I have the latest, as it turned out) for the miniPCI card, and I could successfully change the MAC, but I couldn’t connect to my network, even with the original MAC.

I cannot find any, much less newer firmware for the AP. It is an Xterasys WAP257. My setup has the DSL router sending to this Xteresys POE AP to then connect to a directional antenna which transmits to another house on my property. POE is essential since the AP is a good distance from an outlet, and I want to minimize signal loss with a short cable from the AP to the antenna.
I would like to add another AP to rebroadcast the signal in the other house, since it has a metal roof which degrades the signal quite a bit. Currently, I get good signal at the windows facing the sending antenna.


#10

Netgear does offer special regioned firmwares to overcome that issue.