Windows 8 records slight growth spurt at expense of XP

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Windows 8 records slight growth spurt at expense of XP[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2013/09/myce-windows-8-net-applications-august-2013-95x75.gif[/newsimage]
[quote][/quote]
Read the full article here: http://www.myce.com/news/windows-8-records-slight-growth-spurt-at-expense-of-xp-68628/

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

The most popular Windows version remains Windows 7 which grew from 44.5% in July to 45.6% in August.
Here’s another point not mentioned as loud…

And this…

In July 37.2% of all desktop computers was running this nearly 12 year old operating system, while in August this dropped to 33.7%
This drop is a drop in a bucket of water…how a reporting can say a dip in XP to W8 is construed as users going W8 is dubious as WMD in Iraq.

33.6>7.41 no matter how you look at the numbers. This is in relation with W8 coming on computers and users not having option to downgrade to W7 or this is only related to sales of W8 computers and does nothing to take into effect that the buyers most likely wipe W8 clean and put either XP, Vista, or W7 on the W8 machine and say good riddance to W8.


#3

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2698264]…buyers most likely wipe W8 clean and put either XP, Vista, or W7 on the W8 machine and say good riddance to W8.[/QUOTE]

Don’t forget about free OS’s, such as the many GNU/Linux distros. The great thing about such OS’s is that the upgrades are also free. Hence, you don’t need to worry about your OS going obsolete, thus forcing you to “upgrade” to some garbage like Eight.


#4

To show how poorly the adoption rate of W8 is it is good to compare it to W7. W7 debuted in October and by the following April (7 months) had garnered a 12% slice of the OS pie. W8 has been out nearly a year and has only 7.4%. However, Vista is happy with the news, as it is no longer the red-headed stepchild of the Windows OS lineup.


#5

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2698381]Don’t forget about free OS’s, such as the many GNU/Linux distros. The great thing about such OS’s is that the upgrades are also free. Hence, you don’t need to worry about your OS going obsolete, thus forcing you to “upgrade” to some garbage like Eight.[/QUOTE]

Quite put shortly those O/S are poor comparison to Windows in any day of light to even to make a good comparison with. They sound like they be great but they are no where in the league to compete on Windows level even at XP levels. Until they can play on Windows grounds or surpass they won’t ever get out of Windows shadow…


#6

This monumental gain of Win8 OS sales is probably based on computers-sold. In these 11 months of Win8’s appearance, apparently Win8-loaded PCs are outselling the newest XP-loaded PCs. Gee - wot a surprise.


#7

One thing I have noticed is the large number of refurbished PCs for sale by retail outlets. Nearly all of them have Windows 7 as their OS. If I had to guess, I would say there is a correlation between the sale of refurbished PCs and the general unpopularity of Windows 8. It also doesn’t hurt the refurb market that most people can get by perfectly well using an Intel Core 2 Duo/Quad CPU based system.


#8

I visited our local Fry’s and confirmed this notion with the salesman. “Yes, we ARE selling more Win8-loaded new computers than XP-loaded new computers.”

Simply amazing, huh?

Then the salesman commented that those new Win8-loaded PCs are outselling Win2000-loaded PCs these days, too. Fantastic news!!


#9

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2698725]I visited our local Fry’s and confirmed this notion with the salesman. “Yes, we ARE selling more Win8-loaded new computers than XP-loaded new computers.”

Simply amazing, huh?

Then the salesman commented that those new Win8-loaded PCs are outselling Win2000-loaded PCs these days, too. Fantastic news!![/QUOTE]

And I guess they had no mention of how many people would ask can you put Windows 7 back onto the machine… :stuck_out_tongue: They are comparing a new O/S to a truly old O/S doesn’t really reflect the nature of computing anymore. It’s no surprise that W8 would sell more then XP or 2000 cause they don’t install or make it anymore…that doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure that math out what the end result would show.


#10

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2698731] that doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure that math out what the end result would show.[/QUOTE]

Rocket scientists are getting hard to find these days .
Where can I find one to do the math ? :stuck_out_tongue:


#11

Cholla, you are soooo sly, you!

I should know that double-clutching would always put you in the right gear.


#12

[QUOTE=cholla;2698774]Rocket scientists are getting hard to find these days .
Where can I find one to do the math ? :p[/QUOTE]

lmao…your guess is good as mine… but NSA can sure use alot of them nowdays. But that analogy nowdays is probably dinosaur thinking now-days as well… lol. But simple math old is old and new is new…but W8 hasn’t had the fan spurt as W7 has and that should tell W8 that is didn’t do much to help sales instead torpedoed the sales instead.


#13

Cholla, see? Maybe not a rocket scientist. Maybe just a brain surgeon. Or a double-naught spy.


#14

Windows XP. In July 37.2% of all desktop computers was running this nearly 12 year old operating system, while in August this dropped to 33.7%.

Break down the numbers on country level and the numbers and you find this.

In the U.S., for example, 16.4% of all personal computers ran Windows XP in July, or about one in six, Net Applications’ data showed.

But in China, where XP remains king, 72.1% of the country’s computers relied on the soon-to-retire operating system last month, or nearly three out of every four systems. In any XP doomsday scenario, that means China is in a position four times more precarious than the U.S.

If one assumes that recent trends in XP’s decline continue, then its share in the U.S. will drop to between 9.1% and 11.1% by April 2014

So XP users are many in some countries, while others have updated to later versions.


#15

Slower adoption rate of Windows 8 has a lot to do with lower-than-expected yield rate of multi-point touch screen monitors with very high resolution. The technology initially worked for small-sized phones in a highly profitable way. Now touch’s on 1920*1080 OLED and wearables. Windows 9, the successor to Windows 8.1 or Windows 8.2, will face somewhat better situations, but it will take at least a few more years for mobile and desktop to have a single consistent ecosystem at last. That will also be one without Android of Google, iOS and MacOS of Apple, and Windows of Microsoft partitioning the world’s software space.