Windows 8 price increases

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Windows 8 price increases.

Prices for Microsoft’s newest operating system are due to increase in February. For all of you who have been sitting on the fence, now is the time to buy it, before the prices go up by several hundred percent.

Click to read the full article here: http://www.myce.com/news/windows-8-price-increases-65806/

Feel free to add your comments below. 

Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

I bought the Win 8 Pro version, 1 copy for 39.99, thats it for me. I won’t be updating my other 3 computers.


#3

At the moment, this news going around about the discount deadline will probably be the last major boost for Windows 8 sales, as it will be free publicity working like a “80% off sale must end soon, order your copy today!” advert during the run up to January 31st.

While Windows 8 will continue to be sold with nearly all new computers, it’s coming to the stage where there is little incentive to buy a new computer. For example, go back 10 years ago and there there were significant advantages to replacing your 3 to 5 year old PC - DVD playback, smooth full screen video, much better performance. For 5 years ago, upgrading over a 10 year old PC would give 1080p playback, smooth streaming video (e.g. Flash), multi core CPU and again a much noticeable improvement in performance as well as a quieter running computer.

However for most PCs sold recently with Windows 7, apart from a few areas such as gaming and video encoding performance, it’s hard to imagine what advantage there would be purchasing a new PC other than to replace a failed PC not worth fixing. For laptops, while lighter light/compact laptops would be an incentive to upgrade, many are getting a Tablet instead and few are choosing Windows 8 tablets.

I know some people who are very reluctant to replace even their 10 year old PC. Their reasons are much the same - [I]“Yes it might be slow, but as long as I can read my e-mail, use eBay, check Facebook, etc. it’s fine.”[/I] Like a washing machine, toaster, etc. most wait until it totally fails. Even then they still try getting it serviced to see if they can get any extra life out of it. :doh:

So it will be interesting to see the Windows 8 sales figures from February onwards. :wink:


#4

[QUOTE=Seán;2673902]

I know some people who are very reluctant to replace even their 10 year old PC. Their reasons are much the same - [I]“Yes it might be slow, but as long as I can read my e-mail, use eBay, check Facebook, etc. it’s fine.”[/I] (…) Even then they still try getting it serviced to see if they can get any extra life out of it. :doh:[/quote] Why :doh:? Why throw away something that still serves its purpose?
Additionally, there is some old hardware that was much better than recent products of the same category. :iagree:

So it will be interesting to see the Windows 8 sales figures from February onwards. :wink:
Oh well, that was only an upgrade. A pain in case of a bare-iron installation. :doh:
So, that promotion ended and prices revert to normality. Nothing special.

Michael


#5

It depends on what Microsoft does with the prices of the System Builder editions. If they do not increase prices on these SB versions, then virtually no one will buy the update versions unless they just have to have a downloaded operating system that day, or they want to keep existing programs from their previous install of Win 7. And I wouldn’t advise this course, even though Win 8 is much better than previous versions of Windows when installing over an existing system.

The current prices for the SB editions are much, much less expensive than the projected costs for the upgrades. Microsoft has also given explicit permission to use the System Builder versions in different machines if you switch to a newer build. This version works very much like the full retail versions of Windows in the past. So they are more convenient for enthusiasts to begin with. If they have a distinct price advantage, then the upgrade versions might as well not exist.

The big change, and I believe a very significant one, is that there will not be an inexpensive path to using the operating system. And Microsoft needs this if they expect the system to gain widespread use. OEM builds will still be the major source of new Win 8 systems, but as others have pointed out, computers aren’t just jumping off the shelves these days. And the full Win 8 tablets are extremely expensive compared to a lot of the Android versions, so Microsoft shouldn’t expect much help there either.


#6

[QUOTE=Seán;2673902]At the moment, this news going around about the discount deadline will probably be the last major boost for Windows 8 sales, as it will be free publicity working like a “80% off sale must end soon, order your copy today!” advert during the run up to January 31st.

While Windows 8 will continue to be sold with nearly all new computers, it’s coming to the stage where there is little incentive to buy a new computer. For example, go back 10 years ago and there there were significant advantages to replacing your 3 to 5 year old PC - DVD playback, smooth full screen video, much better performance. For 5 years ago, upgrading over a 10 year old PC would give 1080p playback, smooth streaming video (e.g. Flash), multi core CPU and again a much noticeable improvement in performance as well as a quieter running computer.

However for most PCs sold recently with Windows 7, apart from a few areas such as gaming and video encoding performance, it’s hard to imagine what advantage there would be purchasing a new PC other than to replace a failed PC not worth fixing. For laptops, while lighter light/compact laptops would be an incentive to upgrade, many are getting a Tablet instead and few are choosing Windows 8 tablets.

I know some people who are very reluctant to replace even their 10 year old PC. Their reasons are much the same - [I]“Yes it might be slow, but as long as I can read my e-mail, use eBay, check Facebook, etc. it’s fine.”[/I] Like a washing machine, toaster, etc. most wait until it totally fails. Even then they still try getting it serviced to see if they can get any extra life out of it. :doh:

So it will be interesting to see the Windows 8 sales figures from February onwards. ;)[/QUOTE]

I just bit for the $39.99 upgrade for my Windows 7 Ultimate PC, and added the free (for now) Windows Media Center, and you’re right, I don’t see the point of getting a new OS right now. If, for example, I don’t like Windows 8, I can easily downgrade back to Windows 7, and use that until either my PC gets too old, or Microsoft retires the OS.

I’m happy for now, but MS needs to make the prices appealing for people right now with all the options that they have nowadays.

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2673915]It depends on what Microsoft does with the prices of the System Builder editions. If they do not increase prices on these SB versions, then virtually no one will buy the update versions unless they just have to have a downloaded operating system that day, or they want to keep existing programs from their previous install of Win 7. And I wouldn’t advise this course, even though Win 8 is much better than previous versions of Windows when installing over an existing system.

The current prices for the SB editions are much, much less expensive than the projected costs for the upgrades. Microsoft has also given explicit permission to use the System Builder versions in different machines if you switch to a newer build. This version works very much like the full retail versions of Windows in the past. So they are more convenient for enthusiasts to begin with. If they have a distinct price advantage, then the upgrade versions might as well not exist.

The big change, and I believe a very significant one, is that there will not be an inexpensive path to using the operating system. And Microsoft needs this if they expect the system to gain widespread use. OEM builds will still be the major source of new Win 8 systems, but as others have pointed out, computers aren’t just jumping off the shelves these days. And the full Win 8 tablets are extremely expensive compared to a lot of the Android versions, so Microsoft shouldn’t expect much help there either.[/QUOTE]

I’ve never done the OEM route, but what you say makes a whole lot of sense. It is cheaper than buying the full version for a PC without an OS, and if you have either yourself (if you have the training and expertise) or someone at a tech store to help put your PC together, then the OEM is the way to go.


#7

One way ore another, these [B]busineses[/B] have to profit.
It’s all about making [B]money[/B].

Whatever it takes.
Must generate profit.
Slower Sales = Higher Prices.


#8

Upgraded 2 PCs at 39.95 so I don’t have to worry about this.

Having said that, it was clear from day 0 that this was the plan, so no one should be surprised. If I were Microsoft, I would consider lowering these prices in order to entice more purchases…say $150 and $90, for example, but at the end of the day, price will probably not be the determining factor. If someone wants this, they will buy it. If they are smart, they still have 10 days to get the promotional offers. Maybe we should order a bunch of DVDs and sell them on ebay - I am sure that some folks have already done just this.


#9

Meanwhile Mac OSX is $29 and it’s complete and fully featured! None of this BS of multiple editions with crippled featues.
And then MS nickel and dime us by charging for media center and basic DVD playback. What a crock!
MS should follow the example. OSX is so cheap in part because Apple know most Mac users are consumers or starving artists :slight_smile:
MS should offer low cost version for consumers and keep the gouging for business editions.

Kerry56 dont get your hopes up, expect MS to have similar pricing models to previous editions. While the OEM editions offer savings over retail it’s nothing like the low costs of these upgrade editions. And if I’m not mistaken it’s not easy to find the OEM editions without buying an accompanying system. They aren’t supposed to be sold separately and so upgraders are not supposed to be allowed to buy it. I know places to buy it but I think they bend the rules.


#10

[QUOTE=ivid;2674056]Meanwhile Mac OSX is $29 and it’s complete and fully featured! None of this BS of multiple editions with crippled featues.
And then MS nickel and dime us by charging for media center and basic DVD playback. What a crock!
MS should follow the example. OSX is so cheap in part because Apple know most Mac users are consumers or starving artists :slight_smile:
MS should offer low cost version for consumers and keep the gouging for business editions.

Kerry56 dont get your hopes up, expect MS to have similar pricing models to previous editions. While the OEM editions offer savings over retail it’s nothing like the low costs of these upgrade editions. And if I’m not mistaken it’s not easy to find the OEM editions without buying an accompanying system. They aren’t supposed to be sold separately and so upgraders are not supposed to be allowed to buy it. I know places to buy it but I think they bend the rules.[/QUOTE]That is where you are wrong. Apple makes its money from hardware not software, which is why they nickel and dime you with the hardware.


#11

[QUOTE=ivid;2674056]Meanwhile Mac OSX is $29 and it’s complete and fully featured! None of this BS of multiple editions with crippled featues.
And then MS nickel and dime us by charging for media center and basic DVD playback. What a crock!
MS should follow the example. OSX is so cheap in part because Apple know most Mac users are consumers or starving artists :slight_smile:
MS should offer low cost version for consumers and keep the gouging for business editions.

Kerry56 dont get your hopes up, expect MS to have similar pricing models to previous editions. While the OEM editions offer savings over retail it’s nothing like the low costs of these upgrade editions. And if I’m not mistaken it’s not easy to find the OEM editions without buying an accompanying system. They aren’t supposed to be sold separately and so upgraders are not supposed to be allowed to buy it. I know places to buy it but I think they bend the rules.[/QUOTE]

If Apple was so magnanimous, they would have allowed other companies to manufacture computers with OSX. Instead they sued Psystar into bankruptcy. There are ways of getting around this, but you have to order very specific PC parts in order to make a Hackintosh. And guess what? You get a PC that costs 1/2 of a MacPro workstation has USB 3.0, and runs OSX.

Especially egregious is Apple’s charge for memory upgrades. They give a whole new meaning to RAM.


#12

Macs are over priced for the hardware I had rather have M$ nickel and dime me to death.

I am not a mac hater by any means their prices are just crazy.:bigsmile:


#13

I find it somewhat comical that someone is trying to make Apple look like a corporation that is really concerned about what they charge their customers. Everything Apple does is calculated to extract the maximum amount of money from their customers time and time again. As was mentioned earlier, OSX is cheap because they charge twice the price for the same PC that is running Windows with the same, or faster, hardware.


#14

I foresee that Microsoft will be making drastic changes to Windows with he next version. People will have to relearn halve of what they do, which is especially bad for businesses and power users. Yet somehow, “9” will become the most popular version ever.


#15

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2674098]I foresee that Microsoft will be making drastic changes to Windows with he next version. People will have to relearn halve of what they do, which is especially bad for businesses and power users. Yet somehow, “9” will become the most popular version ever.[/QUOTE]I hope your right because for most Windows 8 was a flop unless you have a M$ surface or mobile device with windows 8.

I like windows 8 personally but it could have been much better.


#16

About OSX…I see a lot of posts mac users wanting to do software video work.
Some video work is difficult to find programs to do what needs to be done.
And many times mac users have to buy a program that is freely available to Windows users.
The problem for Apple remains…that they use too much proprietary stuff…that make their users have to pay for more programs.
In the end, there are too many hoops to jump through.

Lately there have been more programs that run on OSX yet the problem is still there.


#18

Is it still possible to use the Windows 8 upgrade offer?


#19

WishPSG, not sure. I think “no” is the answer but I assume any seller that offers it can back it up. I doubt that Microsoft’s Authentication Service will stop activations because “re-installs” will always be a necessary part of computer life.

If you can find an Upgrade to buy past the deadline-dates, I imagine it will still be activated.

Apple’s $30 OS offer is great, especially when the hardware is double-priced. Of course, so many variants of Linux are even cheaper, if OS costs are the Sole Issue. Personally, I focus on “What can I do with the applications” instead of the prettiness of an OS.


#20

[QUOTE=wishpsg;2676568]Is it still possible to use the Windows 8 upgrade offer?[/QUOTE]as long as you have already purchased it for 39.99 sure it is I bought a couple extra upgrade keys for later before the price went up Feb 1st to 199.00 for windows 8 pro.

you don’t have to upgrade you can do a clean install as long as you had a OS on your hard drive xp-windows 7 it will activate just fine.

Some have said they have activated on a new hard drive clean install but I can’t confirm it though.

OEM is cheaper now than the upgrade windows 8 pro 139.00 would be the way to go if you want windows 8 better deal than an upgrade key for 199.00


#21

Many online stores still have stock of the Windows 8 Pro upgrade. At this time of checking, it’s £43 on Amazon UK, not as cheap as Microsot’s own website promotion, but still a bargain for anyone really interested in the Windows 8 professional version. For comparison, the regular prices are roughly £69 for Windows 8 and £100 for Windows 8 Pro OEM packs.

I remember when Microsoft ran the Windows 7 pre-order promotion, the online stores were constantly running out of stock and once the promotional period ended, there was no left-over stock anywhere.