Windows 8 is the Greatest Operating System of All Time!

vbimport

#1

:bow:

OK, not really, but I just feel like messing with all the whining and complaining people who keep bashing it without using some common sense and installing Classic Shell. It’s not that hard people, really.

Windows 8 is basically Windows 7 with a lot of under the hood performance and security improvements. One install banishes Metro so you never see it or use it. I really don’t understand what there is to complain about.


#2

Like every Windows operating system, there are a few programs that worked in previous versions that don’t work in this one. So compatibility is a possible problem. I’ve only run into two programs that fit this description, but I’m certain that there are more.

Some people don’t like the default behavior of Search in Windows 8. That is going to change in 8.1.

I tried Classic Shell, but prefer StartisBack. $3 for a license that covers two computers, so not very expensive.


#3

No it’s not. It’s the first step on a path leading away from running and viewing multiple programs simultaneously. Although this isn’t enforced yet, it is the vision put forth by Microsoft.

As someone pointed out, it should be called Window rather than Windows.


#4

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2700984]No it’s not. It’s the first step on a path leading away from running and viewing multiple programs simultaneously. Although this isn’t enforced yet, it is the vision put forth by Microsoft.

As someone pointed out, it should be called Window rather than Windows.[/QUOTE]

But I think the focus of this thread is the use of Windows 8/8.1 in desktop mode, where multiple windows is not an issue.

There are plenty of things in the “New” gui that piss me off. Not the least of which is the very existence of the Windows Store, where Microsoft can control and make profit on every application.

But many get blinded by that, and don’t recognize the worth of this operating system when used in ways that Microsoft may not really want us to focus on. Just the idea of using the system in legacy mode instead of their intent is enough to get me to defend it. :slight_smile:

Windows 8 is fast and stable and offers some interesting upgrades from Win 7. New types of restore options and mounting ISO’s natively are two that I’ve used.


#5

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2700986]But I think the focus of this thread is the use of Windows 8/8.1 in desktop mode, where multiple windows is not an issue. [/QUOTE] I beg to differ about the focus of this thread. It’s about whether Windows 8/8.1 is the best thing since sliced bread, and in my opinion it isn’t.

Desktop mode is considered legacy by Microsoft, while the formerly-known-as-Metro mode is the new way to run programs.

Legacy support is something that Microsoft will eventually be removing, unless they get a clear message from users that they are going in the wrong direction.

So if Microsoft get their way, there won’t even be any desktop mode in some future Windows version.


#6

Microsoft is losing the war on tablets and other devices that people bring into the workplace on their own. They have completely lost the war with Windows RT. They have only one device of any worth in tablets, the Surface Pro, and it is priced outside the reach of many, except for those who can justify the cost for compatibility across their portables and their desktop Windows environment. Windows Phone operating system is found on only a tiny percentage of phones. And phones are becoming more and more capable as auxiliary devices for the workplace.

They have not been able to convince a majority of computer enthusiasts to support their vision of computing through the new “Metro” interface on desktop computers. And most importantly, they haven’t made a dent in enterprise. Virtually no one is shifting to Windows 8 as their main operating system in business environments, due in no little part to the retraining necessary for the new interface.

So, if Microsoft decides to shift entirely to this new interface, they will lose. They will lose the enthusiasts who influence opinions and writing on the net. They will lose their business customers who will continue to cling to Windows 7 for however long they can, and who will demand extensions for that system even when it is scheduled for obsolescence. What I called the “legacy” desktop will be with us for the foreseeable future simply because Microsoft cannot afford to drop it.

In the meantime, we can take advantage of the improvements that Microsoft has made in Windows 8, and ignore the new interface quite easily. For this particular operating system, there is virtually no downside.


#7

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2700998]It’s about whether Windows 8/8.1 is the best thing since sliced bread, and in my opinion it isn’t.[/QUOTE]

You’re right about that,but neither was win 7…and for 30$,you can’t get any better windows operating system…:wink:

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2701002]So, if Microsoft decides to shift entirely to this new interface, they will lose. They will lose the enthusiasts who influence opinions and writing on the net. They will lose their business customers who will continue to cling to Windows 7 for however long they can, and who will demand extensions for that system even when it is scheduled for obsolescence. What I called the “legacy” desktop will be with us for the foreseeable future simply because Microsoft cannot afford to drop it…[/QUOTE]

Totally agree with your analysis…I work @ a company with +300 employees and 25 of them have administrative tasks,but they hardly know how to employ windows updates!!:eek:

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2701002]In the meantime, we can take advantage of the improvements that Microsoft has made in Windows 8, and ignore tFor this particular operating system, there is virtually no downside.[/QUOTE]

If you know how to handle it’s bad points,there’s indeed no downside…:bigsmile:


#8

At my workplace, we’ve upgraded straight from Windows XP to 8 a few months ago. To date, the Start screen has just mainly served one very useful purpose - Going into Desktop mode. :stuck_out_tongue:

I certainly much prefer Windows 8 over XP at work. Despite running on just 3GB of RAM and 5-year old hardware (Core2Duo 3GHz), it flies in comparison to XP. The Windows XP installation took at least 5 minutes to fully boot, most of the time at “Applying computer settings” when logging in. Windows 8 is straight to the login screen in a few seconds and loads the roaming profile in 20 to 30 seconds. Windows 8 also performs a heck of a lot better with multitasking than XP and far better network performance. XP was a pain for intermittently dropping network drive connections. The last clean Windows XP installation only temporarily improved things.

As for Windows 7 vs. 8, it’s hard to say which I prefer, i.e. I like Windows 8 for its better desktop mode features such as the improved task manager, copying files info box, etc., while I like Windows 7 for its native Start menu. I have Windows 7 & 8 on my home PC as dual-boot, but so far I haven’t seen any reason to start using Windows 8 over 7. Sure, Windows 8 starts up a heck of a lot faster, but I only boot my PC once a day apart from the odd occasion I need to reboot. Unlike the drastic difference I’ve experienced between Windows XP and 8 at work, Windows 7 seems to perform just as well as Windows 8 on my home PC and all my software runs just fine in Windows 7. However, if there comes a time when I need to use an application that only works or works better in Windows 8, at least I’ve it ready for use. :wink:

[B]So what’s my main advice about Windows 8:[/B]

Pin all regularly used software to the taskbar and always use the right mouse button at the bottom-left for everything else. That’s exactly how I use Windows 8 differently to Windows 7. :slight_smile:

By pinning software to the taskbar, you can open recently accessed documents by “dragging” the software icon up from the taskbar, much like how clicking the ‘>’ next to software on the Windows 7 Start menu (including third party replacements) brought up recently accessed documents. The Windows 8 Start screen doesn’t seem to have the capability.

By right-clicking the bottom left, it is possible to go directly into the command prompt, control panel, file explorer, etc.

Finally, I use the Windows Key + R to quickly launch accessories, such as calc, notepad, etc.


#9

[QUOTE=Seán;2701017]At my workplace, we’ve upgraded straight from Windows XP to 8 a few months ago. To date, the Start screen has just mainly served one very useful purpose - Going into Desktop mode. :p.[/QUOTE]

Why no Classic Start Menu?It will save you a lot of headaches…:bigsmile:

[QUOTE=Seán;2701017]Windows 8 also performs a heck of a lot better with multitasking than XP and far better network performance. XP was a pain for intermittently dropping network drive connections. The last clean Windows XP installation only temporarily improved things…[/QUOTE]
Some people who are touting win XP forgot that it only became decent after SP3…:bigsmile:

[QUOTE=Seán;2701017]As for Windows 7 vs. 8, it’s hard to say which I prefer, i.e. I like Windows 8 for its better desktop mode features such as the improved task manager, copying files info box, etc., while I like Windows 7 for its native Start menu. [/QUOTE]

Numerous times said…Classic Start Menu lets you forget about that win 8 shortcoming…:bigsmile:


#10

I’ve Classic Start Menu installed on Windows 8 on my home PC, but as I only use a few applications at work, I figured why bother with a start menu at all when I can have the applications I use pinned to the taskbar. :wink:


#11

OK, not really, but I just feel like messing with all the whining and complaining people who keep bashing it without using some common sense and installing Classic Shell. It’s not that hard people, really. [/QUOTE]

This is why it is so wrong…you have to use a unsecured 3rd party to get a desktop mode something which M$ could program right into the install Desktop mode or Metro mode. Very plain a simple to make and do but no they wanted their “SURFACE” a total flop and be Apple which they are not and not focusing on what their core users are and wanted. Forgot to mention I have to watch one security for M$ holes and now I have a 3rd party software that introduces more security flaws for malware/virus to get through to cause more infections. So rather then worrying about one program and its security now you have two the O/S and the 3rd party menu to double check to make sure one isn’t causing the security hole for malware/virus.

QUOTE=negritude;2700981Windows 8 is basically Windows 7 with a lot of under the hood performance and security improvements. One install banishes Metro so you never see it or use it. I really don’t understand what there is to complain about.[/QUOTE]

Might or might not but since no one here knows the actually O/S source code this is all speculation. Security improvements…that is a joke 8 already had security updates…so that blows that security improvement out of the water. So let’s avoid talking about security. Really never see or install metro? Install it without 3rd party software menu and tell me what screen do you get Metro…nothing else…how one comes to that conclusion that a W8 install isn’t metro is left of field.

To Sean…
my workplace isn’t going to adopted W8 now or in the future. There software support for W8 will not work with their custom software or hardware so that would and should tell M$ they aren’t supporting their customer base that feeds their money trough. Most business where I go to and see are going Windows 7 Sp1 Enterprise or Pro not Windows 8 not by the closet margin where I am.


#12

I installed the program when I was forced to get Win 8 with my new computer, I purchased Startlsback, the only thing I see missing is the Accessories program in the all programs menu ? Does one of the other replacement start programs include it?


#13

Have you looked all the way down the list? It is called Windows Accessories.


#14

By the way, coolcolors, thumbs up for a first class unintelligible and meaningless rant about 3rd party security of which you obviously know nothing. But your presentation was certainly foaming at the mouth rant worthy.


#15

Duh!, Found it thank you Kerry


#16

[QUOTE=negritude;2700981]…
Windows 8 is basically Windows 7 …[/QUOTE]
Not accurate. Windows 8 doesn’t have
Desktop Gadgets, small start menu, and Aero, (well Aero only on the taskbar) & the corner that instantly minimized all the windows simply by clicking on the right corner of taskbar just to name a few. Microsoft removed far too many features. This was a bad move on their part. Windows 8 is alright if your into the metro screen If not, windows 7 might be a better choice. One thing I noticed about windows 8 which is a plus is…it has better video card support for old computers. So if your pc can handle windows 8 it will have the taskbar Aero support for sure. :clap:
If Microsoft doesn’t give the people what they want…no one will update their version of windows.


#17

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2701114]By the way, coolcolors, thumbs up for a first class unintelligible and meaningless rant about 3rd party security of which you obviously know nothing. But your presentation was certainly foaming at the mouth rant worthy.[/QUOTE]

Really so you want 3rd party software that is itself not more secure then W8 itself to allow more and more malware through your computer by all means go ahead. I rather be more concerned with one O/S and it’s security rather then have to download more of what W8 should’ve been and had a True start menu or Metro install. Go ahead and say what you must the more software you integrate to the O/S the less secure it becomes. I do know more and how you would decide that is also a mute point when there are real security concern…


#18

Name ONE piece of malware that uses Classic Shell or any of the replacement UI programs for Windows 8 like Start8 or Startisback as an attack vector. Just one example will do.

Classic Shell has been around since 2009. Surely if it weakens the defenses of XP, Vista, Win 7 or Win 8, someone would have utilized it by now. So, tell us which SPECIFIC malware does this?

Classic Shell does not replace system files, nor does it modify registry settings. Neither does StartisBack. They do not need elevated privileges to install or run. StartisBack doesn’t run any services, nor does it use an external framework. How exactly will these provide a way to attack the operating system?

Your assertions fall flat without proof.


#19

One other thing that W8 doesn’t have (I bought a laptop for my lady that has W8) is the classic games.
That caused me a lot of work to install classic games…I simply refused to go to that store of theirs…even if it was for free.

First thing she said was “where is solitaire?”…I had no way of knowing they decided not to load those games.

I have had trouble with one driver with that Laptop…I have to uninstall and then re-install…yet that may not be W8 fault…I dunno.

Really though, I think I could live with W8 provided I can do anyway with the metro crap…I asked her if she wanted me to load a start menu program but she said no.

So whenever in the future I get cornered by the fact that I have to buy and use W8, the first thing I will do is get one of those programs.
Really I don’t think it will be that bad…provided I don’t have to look at metro.

What little I have fooled with the OS…looks like W7 with bs metro startup to me.

The file system looks fairly much like earlier OSs.

I am hoping they don’t screw it up more with the coming release…


#20

Looks like I’ve discovered a rather interesting bug in Windows 8.

If I try changing letters to uppercase (or lowercase) in a file name on the desktop, it tells me I need to get permission from myself to do this. :stuck_out_tongue:

In this example, I tried changing ‘test’ to ‘Test’. I don’t remember running into this issue with Windows XP or 7.

In case anyone else runs into this issue, a workaround is to add an extra letter at the end temporarily. E.g. rename ‘test’ to ‘Test1’ and then rename ‘Test1’ to ‘Test’.