Windows 7 lost 5% market share in second half 2015, XP still on 10% of computers

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Windows 7 lost 5% market share in second half 2015, XP still on 10% of computers[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2016/01/StatCounter-os-ww-monthly-201412-201512-95x75.png[/newsimage]

In December 2015 about 10% of the internet users was still on the unsupported Windows XP, according to market research companies NetApplications and StatCounter.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/windows-7-lost-5-market-share-in-second-half-2015-xp-still-on-10-of-computers-78273/](http://www.myce.com/news/windows-7-lost-5-market-share-in-second-half-2015-xp-still-on-10-of-computers-78273/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

The reason is likely the release of Windows 10 in July, which is a free upgrade for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 users.

Free, sure, but still the nagscreen popping up to accept the free upgrade for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 users can not be classified as anything but annoying and is probably the real reason for the increase.
My father-in-law finally gave up and did hit upgrade as it was constantly nagging. The attempt failed and so now he has become a MAC only user and found alternatives for the few Windows applications he used. I offered my help to get him up and running again, but as he put it: I simply can not be bothered with Microsoft anymore.

I think the current nag-strategy serves a good purpose in giving users with only one foot in the Windows world the last push to finally leave the platform entirely :clap:


#3

I know I am in the minority but I love Windows 10 Pro, I could never go back to windows 7, I have about 5 builds in my house going all the up to Skylakes 6700K , but my favorite toy is something i didnt build , it my new
Microsoft 13.5 Surface Book, its not the Surface Pro like I had before that got stolen, this is a full feature laptop with USB ports and 4K screen and a NVMe SSD ( 512gb) and dedicated GPU Nvidia 980M and it comes with a keyboard unlike the Surface Pro which is a tablet and a laptop.


2600.00 USD Delivered to my door. Its expensive but I spend a lot on my desktop builds also. Now that I have this I am going to tear down some of my older builds, like the 2600k , 2700K, 3770K, and 4770K, builds. I will keep my 4960X build in tact. I feel very blessed to have a hobby in my old age, I have learned most of my building on this forum, from the experts we have here. Its been about 11 years here for me and I loved every one of them.


#4

[QUOTE=alan1476;2765956]I know I am in the minority but I love Windows 10 Pro, I could never go back to windows 7, I have about 5 builds in my house going all the up to Skylakes 6700K , but my favorite toy is something i didnt build , it my new
Microsoft 13.5 Surface Book, its not the Surface Pro like I had before that got stolen, this is a full feature laptop with USB ports and 4K screen and a NVMe SSD ( 512gb) and dedicated GPU Nvidia 980M and it comes with a keyboard unlike the Surface Pro which is a tablet and a laptop.


2600.00 USD Delivered to my door. Its expensive but I spend a lot on my desktop builds also. Now that I have this I am going to tear down some of my older builds, like the 2600k , 2700K, 3770K, and 4770K, builds. I will keep my 4960X build in tact. I feel very blessed to have a hobby in my old age, I have learned most of my building on this forum, from the experts we have here. Its been about 11 years here for me and I loved every one of them.[/QUOTE]

Oooh, cool! I think maybe I will have to buy a baby like that sometime this year, a true full fledged computer which can do most I would like to do. I am all in it for technology and so I do love Windows 10 too and use the OS on my main computer, I just hate some of the stuff the company throws into the mix as it seems so unnecessary.

Like the surveillance stuff we have discussed before (they do not manage to fool anyone, and only a few years back most of it would have been considered illegal activity and if I was to do anything remotely like it, I would face serious charges in most countries of the world and so I will not accept it even from the creator… It does not become less questionable when coming from a corporate environment, but then it is suddenly legal :confused:)

Then there is this annoying nag to upgrade which is way above acceptable level unless you do something about it yourself as I write above.


#5

Let me rephrase that in a sentence to Microsoft:

I think it is fantastic that you take care of my network apart from a few mac and linux installs for which you could do better, but if you do not mind, I do not want you in person here apart from in front of me… Understood?

Would that be direct enough?


#6

Yo Xerces, syntax error… Sentence which to you refer? :smiley:


#7

Looks to me the Win10 gain is mostly from XP while 7 just shows a small mid-year bump but overall maintained its position hence no real loss.

10 is already dead on the desktop … maybe it can survive on mobiles ( tablets/phones) but that’s it. I predict it won’t even see the 15% market share ever - it’s dead, Jim!


#8

@voxsmart - They have no business harvesting unnecessary data in my network… That is corporate hacking and nothing else… which is questionable because it is legal!


#9

Seriously?

Actually Microsoft takes ownership of ALL your (current/future) files when you agree to install 10 - what exactly is your problem when you granted Microsoft all rights?


#10

[QUOTE=Millennium12;2765993]Seriously?

Actually Microsoft takes ownership of ALL your (current/future) files when you agree to install 10 - what exactly is your problem when you granted Microsoft all rights?[/QUOTE]

May I recognize the need for the latest Windows install while retaining the right to fight back?
Come on - EULA… What none reads which is put there is only so so legal to (or ought to be) as we represent the majority…
(In all honesty, I do read, still the above is true)


#11

This story is about exciting as watching paint dry on the wall. :Z If one looks carefully at July 2015 when Win10 was rolled out Microsoft pulled Windows 7 out of the market. Why else would there be a drop since people couldn’t get Windows 7 anymore. That’s what I find ludicrous about that report they again failed to see Windows 7 machines are no longer being sold or made. Why else would the market share go down. This is elementary math even a kindergarten can figure this out. If it wasn’t for MS forcing makers to go Win10 I can guarantee Windows 7 would be a level market share graph. Microsoft is making every effort to kill Windows 7 but so far it has gone the wrong way right into Windows 7 camp. Also if Windows 10 was good as it’s made out to be why are people still downloading my Registry edits to Kill the NAG and Win10 pop upgrade on Win7 and Win8 machine. Those numbers seem to be inching up which tells me otherwise


#12

[QUOTE=Xercus;2765992]@voxsmart - They have no business harvesting unnecessary data in my network… That is corporate hacking and nothing else… which is questionable because it is legal![/QUOTE]

I see now, yes, I totally agree. I don’t like my personal data being collected. I have nothing to hide, but it’s my data, just because Windows 10 is free, I can’t see that gives Microsoft the right to nose in to what I do with it.


#13

You do not need to have anything to hide to insist on your privacy.
It is way overkill and just to outline a few data collected unless you do something about it yourself:

[B]Each and every program start and installation you do on your computer[/B] (ShutUp 10 does not stop this behavior).
[B]Your Windows password[/B] (Windows store) / [B]Your Wi-Fi password[/B] (WiFi Sense)

I do not need to go any further, the above alone is enough to get classified as spyware.
Then they went and back-ported most of the technology to Windows 7 and Windows 8.1, meaning you will have to manually remove Microsoft spyware on these platforms as well.

[B]Then they tell me that corporate hacking is for the better for customers and that they spy on you to provide better services?[/B]
I have to say I am sceptical as to the method of choice which remove user sovereignty on their own computer, even before going into the legal ‘grey zone’ where you operate.

[B]They inform you that they are collecting data, but it does not make it a less malicious activity when enabled by default.[/B]
According to privacy the company should ask the user for permission, but the way it is today, Microsoft chose to overrule customers and leave them with the tedious task to regain control and get back in the driver seat on their own PC.
In this task, you will not get help from Microsoft, thus confirming the behavior to be malicious, and you will for the most have to rely on third-party forums such as this.
[B]It is my right as an individual to decide what information I would like to share with them and hence it can not legally be Microsoft’s decision.[/B]

[B]That brings me to the closing part… The EULA… A real ‘catch22’ (aka damned if you do, damned if you don’t).[/B]
You will have to accept that before being allowed to install, but before you install, you simply can not accept the EULA because you can not know what you are answering.
Another thing is that they are written in a language which only serves the purpose of confusing most readers.
Practically what it is all about is to deny responsibility for anything that may happen during the installation/use even if Microsoft is aware of it and even if they are the sole reason for your trouble.
On the other side, you as the user bear any and all responsibility towards Microsoft who can invalidate your license as they see fit, hold you accountant for any of your actions and so forth.

[B]In other words, a one way scam also called a company disclaimer.[/B]
Now, how about all of us customers agreeing on a common CLA (corporate license agreement) where we turn the table around and force Microsoft to sign it before being able to sell their product?


#14

I guess I’m one of the few that took the free upgrade.  I wouldn’t pay for win10 but I took the free upgrade. Sure I added aeroglass (3rd party software to bring back full areo), classic start menu, had to reenable guest account for my SMB shares, and disable the app that sends telemetry to MS.

I think the privacy thing is moot.  You can manually disable it in win10, and win7 installed updates which bring the same thing to win 7.Â

Win10 isn’t groundbreaking different. MS may have issues if they don’t get more traction before the free 1 year runs out.


#15

[QUOTE=Zod;2766010]I guess I’m one of the few that took the free upgrade. I wouldn’t pay for win10 but I took the free upgrade. Sure I added aeroglass (3rd party software to bring back full areo), classic start menu, had to reenable guest account for my SMB shares, and disable the app that sends telemetry to MS.

I think the privacy thing is moot. You can manually disable it in win10, and win7 installed updates which bring the same thing to win 7.

Win10 isn’t groundbreaking different. MS may have issues if they don’t get more traction before the free 1 year runs out.[/QUOTE]

I have upgraded several computers in my home as I in reality have to be up front in most aspects and this Christmas, Server 2016 had its first test run.
You are correct in that they in reality does not have a really different feel to them, in registry though, you will find huge differences between the two. Operational functionality may seem the same, but in reality there are wast differences also on this level.

The trouble with Windows 10 is that Microsoft became malware developers when developing it. Windows 10 comes with malicious spyware developed by none other than Microsoft and they try to hide their fraudulent development by stating it is for the better for their customers.

I do not care who tries to steal data from my network, even if they hide behind being a corporation. In fact, I have yet to experience any employee pulling off as much fraudulent activity in my entire career as Microsoft have tried within the last few months.
As it seems, I would advice all other malware developers to include an EULA, you can hide your malicious activity behind and get away with it just by doing so obviously.

Criminals surface in all shapes and organizational forms…
We have battled spyware for years, and I will not accept it in my network, private or professional. I just never foresaw the day I had to battle Spyware deliberately developed by Microsoft.


#16

[QUOTE=Xercus;2766017]…
I do not care who tries to steal data from my network, even if they hide behind being a corporation. In fact, I have yet to experience any employee pulling off as much fraudulent activity in my entire career as Microsoft have tried within the last few months.
…[/QUOTE]

Well, there is no stealing and no fraudulent activity - YOU are the [U]guest [/U]using Win10 and have no rights at all.


#17

I do disagree with you of course, I am a paying customer and Windows 10 is not free and never was as you will have to have a prior license to get it.
The fact that Microsoft did choose to make the upgrade free does not make it free and it does not apply to me who use the Enterprise version anyway.

What you say is that if I develop a program, I can do what I want to you no matter how criminal or malicious, and that holds no truth.

To develop software does not make you entitled to steal data from another’s network. Microsoft’s spyware technically follows other spyware’s way of operating 100% and like other spyware it comes with no uninstaller.

Just being able to stop the behavior means you will have a sleeping spyware on your machine which can get activated at a later time, even patched to send the data to another server by another malware.
Why is it so that we bring other spyware-programmers to court, while when Microsoft does exactly the same criminal activity, some of you find it to be both acceptable and legal?

The basic fact is exactly this.
Microsoft has programmed and released a Spyware which is part of their Windows 10 operating system and spread it to their other two client operating systems Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 with only one purpose. To harvest as much data as they possibly can from their customers, and I really do not care for their reasons.
If I were to do the same, I would face charges even if it was a part of my program.

That is the reality.


#18

[QUOTE=Xercus;2766028]…

What you say is that if I develop a program, I can do what I want to you no matter how criminal or malicious, and that holds no truth.

…[/QUOTE]

Well, try put MS to court when…

there is the T&C/EULA you agreed to and that’s it - you don’t have to install 10 if you don’t like (paid for or free) spyware and giving up all rights to you files.

Xercus, no offence but your argumentation is an beautiful oxymoron!


#19

O.K. This got a little interesting.

So what you are saying is that the T&C/EULA can contain criminal elements and still be legal?
examplified, If I include lines as to an evil malware included which you like the wast majority do not read as it is all written in lawyer terms, I have a good go to steal your documents and other sensitive data, still you can not drag me to court?

I know it would be possible to sue me in my country even with the EULA and you would still win, but of course the protection of the private individual, may be lesser in other parts of the world.


#20

I thought I should clarify as it came out a little biased which was not my goal:

In Norway, this is a typical example how it could be seen in a Norwegian court.

  1. There is a limit to what you can ask people to accept to be able to use software and giving up rights to your own data would be considered way too much.
  2. Windows is the largest operating system in the world and so I somewhat have to use it to get access to programs I need at home/work.
    This would limit what Microsoft could ask even further, as I am practically forced to accept that EULA no matter what it says.
  3. The fact that most do not read the EULA could, but not necessarily also be given weight as that is common knowledge in Norway and most in the Jury probably fails in reading it themselves so I think it would, though I can not be sure.

With the above explained, you can probably better understand my wording above, I am a little surprised that’s all, and by all means, no offence :flower: