Windows 10 now ‘recommended update’ on Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 systems

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Windows 10 now ‘recommended update’ on Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 systems[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2015/07/myce-windows-10-here-95x75.png[/newsimage]

Microsoft now automatically marks Windows 10 as a ‘recommended update’ on Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 systems. This means installation of Windows 10 automatically starts on systems with ‘automatic updating’ enabled.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/windows-10-now-recommended-update-on-windows-7-and-windows-8-1-systems-78510/](http://www.myce.com/news/windows-10-now-recommended-update-on-windows-7-and-windows-8-1-systems-78510/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Oh my, isn’t that just hunky-dory!!


#3

I’m assuming that Microsoft will send consultants to fix unbootable Windows systems and fix application incompatibilities they have forced on people, and do so free-of charge?

Or am I assuming too much?! :rolleyes:


#4

I read a pretty funny analogy of this on Reddit. Imagine you’re ordering fajitas at your local Mexican food restaurant, but the waiter keeps pushing you to get the enchiladas. Everyone else is raving about them, but you want fajitas. The order comes and you’ve gotten enchiladas you didn’t want. You send them back, but when the plate comes back to you once more, you’ve got enchiladas, only this time, the waiter is forcing them in your mouth.

It doesn’t matter how good the enchiladas are, the cook has to realize someone might want something else.


#5

This is becoming tragicomic, no less. First it was an optional upgrade, then it became a forced optional upgrade and now it has become a recommended upgrade?

To start off, I am always first and do use Windows 10 or more correctly, I have battled Windows 10 since its release and only the last 6-8 weeks it has been quiet enough to protect my privacy so much as it is said.
Many updates do deliberately reset privacy settings to allow Microsoft to spy on you and so unless you have more defenses against it, you have to be on the alert and check your settings frequently, let that be the basis for the below.

I am concerned on behalf of Jane and John Doe as Microsoft does not accept any responsibility if the upgrade goes wrong even if it has been brought to their knowledge that it will fail. Trouble is, it will fail for many of you who are running on older hardware and so I have to urge you to go to the hardware manufacturers website and check compatibility for your computer as soon as possible.

Based on the fact proven without doubt, the enormous privacy breach the entire spyware operating system Windows 10 really is. I also must advise all of you who are handling sensitive data to go back to Windows 7. It is in your interest to keep your data private, and I can already guarantee you that Microsoft has access to all medical journals and any other sensitive data you are handling if you are on Windows 10.

[B]Be aware that they do record much:[/B] (The following are from their privacy statement)

[B]Name and contact data.[/B] We collect your first and last name, email address, postal address, phone number, and other similar contact data.

[B]Credentials.[/B] We collect passwords, password hints, and similar security information used for authentication and account access.

[B]Demographic data.[/B] We collect data about you such as your age, gender, country and preferred language.

[B]Interests and favorites.[/B] We collect data about your interests and favorites, such as the teams you follow in a sports app, the stocks you track in a finance app, or the favorite cities you add to a weather app. In addition to those you explicitly provide, your interests and favorites may also be inferred or derived from other data we collect.

[B]Payment data.[/B] We collect data necessary to process your payment if you make purchases, such as your payment instrument number (such as a credit card number), and the security code associated with your payment instrument.

[B]Usage data.[/B] We collect data about how you interact with our services. This includes data, such as the features you use, the items you purchase, the web pages you visit, and the search terms you enter. This also includes data about your device and the network you use to connect to our services, including IP address, device identifiers (such as the IMEI number for phones), regional and language settings. It includes information about the operating systems and other software installed on your device, including product keys. And it includes data about the performance of the services and any problems you experience with them.

[B]Contacts and relationships.[/B] We collect data about your contacts and relationships if you use a Microsoft service to manage contacts, or to communicate or interact with other people or organizations.

[B]Location data.[/B] We collect data about your location, which can be either precise or imprecise. Precise location data can be Global Position System (GPS) data, as well as data identifying nearby cell towers and Wi-Fi hotspots, we collect when you enable location-based services or features. Imprecise location data includes, for example, a location derived from your IP address or data that indicates where you are located with less precision, such as at a city or postal code level.

[B]Content.[/B] We collect content of your files and communications when necessary to provide you with the services you use. For example, if you receive an email using Outlook.com, we need to collect the content of that email in order to deliver it to your inbox, display it to you, enable you to reply to it, and store it for you until you choose to delete it. Examples of this data include: the content of your documents, photos, music or video you upload to a Microsoft service such as OneDrive, as well as the content of your communications sent or received using Microsoft services such Outlook.com or Skype, including the:
[ul]
[li]subject line and body of an email,
[/li][li]text or other content of an instant message,
[/li][li]audio and video recording of a video message, and
[/li][li]audio recording and transcript of a voice message you receive or a text message you dictate.
[/li][/ul]

That was just from their privacy statement. :confused:
The EULA includes collection of keystrokes on a general level and more and so yes. Windows 10 in its current state can not be considered anything but a large security breach in itself.
[B]Actually a little funny, but even Windows XP must be considered a more secure OS at current as you at least have to be hacked before anyone can get to your data. In windows 10, you are already pre-hacked by Microsoft.[/B]


#6

Go back to Win.7?


#7

Forgive me if I’ve mentioned this before. An acquaintance owns a rather nice fairly expensive, but slightly older Acer laptop. It had Windows 7 Ultimate on it and worked very well. As he didn’t want to bother me (thank you Jim) he decides to update to 10 after being nagged every time he booted it up. Well, guess what. After downloading 10 and waiting for it to load, it just died. (his words, not mine) Then I had the knock on the door, yes it was Jim with lappie under arm and babbling about being stupid.
Oh crap! here we go again!
I booted the laptop to see what was going on and was greeted by a notice from guess who, saying “NOT ON THIS PLATFORM”. Then watched it revert to 7 all by it’s self complete with missing and corrupted files and non running programmes.
WTF!!! I left him to sort out the damage, I really can’t be assed any more.
Bloody Windows 10, I’m now so sick of it screwing my 10 test rig it’s got to go.
I think I will play with a few Linux distro’s. “F” Microsoft! :a


#8

[QUOTE=durkinjt;2767717]Go back to Win.7?[/QUOTE]

within 30 days or your old key is invalidated and no more way back even you got the DVD!


#9

[QUOTE=DoMiN8ToR;2767698]We’ve just posted the following news: Windows 10 now ‘recommended update’ on Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 systems[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2015/07/myce-windows-10-here-95x75.png[/newsimage]

            Read the full article here: http://www.myce.com/news/windows-10-now-recommended-update-on-windows-7-and-windows-8-1-systems-78510/

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.[/QUOTE]

Not for me since using DisableGWX and DisableWindows10 Registry program I have effectively killed MS attempts to circumvent me. (&(& to be you MS. I been telling people to use these two files to kick MS in the a55 for their stupidity but some haven’t found it yet.


#10

I’m on Win10 and it’s working great for me.Â

That being said I’ve never seen anyone so aggressive with an OS upgrade.   It’s amazing that’s its free and Microsoft still has to try megahard to get people to install it.  It’s not a bad OS.  Maybe they would get higher adoption rates if they fixed the things people didn’t like (aka the privacy stuff).    I think what they’re doing will make people try harder to avoid win10. They’ll start to loathe it the more Microsoft tries to make them use it.  Â


#11

[QUOTE=Zod;2767748]I’m on Win10 and it’s working great for me.Â

That being said I’ve never seen anyone so aggressive with an OS upgrade.   It’s amazing that’s its free and Microsoft still has to try megahard to get people to install it.  It’s not a bad OS.  Maybe they would get higher adoption rates if they fixed the things people didn’t like (aka the privacy stuff).    I think what they’re doing will make people try harder to avoid win10. They’ll start to loathe it the more Microsoft tries to make them use it.   [/QUOTE]

If I remember Microsoft made this stupid decision back in October, right at the time Win 10 adoption was tailing off to nothing. They obviously came to conclusion that if people won’t go willingly they will be forced, the 1 billion goal needs to be reached one way or the other.

If anyone WANTS to upgrade to Win 10, fine, go ahead. But to try and force untold potential problems onto unsuspecting non tech savvy users is the height of arrogance and something Microsoft should be ashamed of, but of course they will be too busy shouting from the rooftops how all the extra millions that have been railroaded into the upgrade love Windows 10. :a


#12

[QUOTE=Zod;2767748]I’m on Win10 and it’s working great for me.

That being said I’ve never seen anyone so aggressive with an OS upgrade. It’s amazing that’s its free and Microsoft still has to try megahard to get people to install it. It’s not a bad OS. Maybe they would get higher adoption rates if they fixed the things people didn’t like (aka the privacy stuff). I think what they’re doing will make people try harder to avoid win10. They’ll start to loathe it the more Microsoft tries to make them use it. [/QUOTE]
It’s called Windows App Store…also if it was so good as it was like when Windows 7 was released - users flocked to it without any real under hand tactics to get users to get it. For Windows 10 to use under hand tactics just tells me it’s not such a great O/S as they proclaim it to be.


#13

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2767773]It’s called Windows App Store…also if it was so good as it was like when Windows 7 was released - users flocked to it without any real under hand tactics to get users to get it. For Windows 10 to use under hand tactics just tells me it’s not such a great O/S as they proclaim it to be.[/QUOTE]

But most people who are on Win 10 absolutely love it. I know because Microsoft themselves said that a few weeks back, so it must be true…:stuck_out_tongue:


#14

LOL, I am on Windows 10, but apart from downloading Asphalt 8 from that store because of a recommendation from a friend, I have not been there. A messy place to navigate but the search function made it o.k. Slick and fun arcade racer though, very fun.

It seem overkill desperate though, trying to force people to upgrade and I have to agree with Zod as I’ve never seen anyone so aggressive with an OS upgrade either.
After taming it, it behaves great, and after tweaking policies and adding back the F8 menu upon boot so I can turn off driver signing requirement when needed, I am quite happy with it.
That is hardly the point here though, you should all be allowed to stay behind if you so desire and what they do here is getting people downright angry. Again, Zod has a point in mentioning that they really should concentrate on the reason why people hesitate in upgrading like fixing the all overshadowing privacy issue.

It does amuse me that people do whatever they can to make Windows 8.1 and 10 look like Windows 7 and thinking of just how ignorant Microsoft must be, not giving users what they obviously want as far as user interface goes…


#15

[QUOTE=Xercus;2767780]It does amuse me that people do whatever they can to make Windows 8.1 and 10 look like Windows 7 and thinking of just how ignorant Microsoft must be, not giving users what they obviously want as far as user interface goes…[/QUOTE]
Glad I used the two Registry edits to kill any attempts by Micro-shaft to shaft me with Windows 10. I couldn’t been more happier after using those two Registry edits to stop Windows 10.


#16

A friend of mine is ordering a build from OCUK. He is wondering if he should have Win10 on it shipped by OC…I said Have No OS on it and buy Win7 (cheaper) Install Win7 then update to Win10 if he wishes to do so…What would you do…I for one will not touch Win10 with a barge pole. Staying with Win7 for as long as I can. Cheers folks.


#17

Found a good picture to go with the story:

:bigsmile:



#18

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2767927]Found a good picture to go with the story:

:bigsmile:[/QUOTE]

LOL, I think it gives a correct picture of the situation Kerry :bigsmile:


#19

How to say, I hate Windows 10, which has to do with my failed experience. I was interested in it before using Win 10, but when I upgraded Windows 7 to Windows 10, I always failed , I know, it probably has a lot to do with my computer skills, and I’m not very good at it , But when I bought an upgrade for $39.5, I realized that the real problem was not me, it was Microsoft,The upgrade was successful, but it was unable to enter Windows 10 with password normally ,My friend told me that you need to reset your password before upgrading, especially when using third-party tools ,I am very confused


#20

@Famser

Upgrading from Windows 7(or Win 8) to Windows 10 is easy and still currently free (at least here in the USA it is) if you use the upgrade tied to “Assistive Technologies”… https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/accessibility/windows10upgrade

it’s free til the end of this year. so if you got Windows 7 (or Windows 8) i can confirm it works as i got a hold of a used Laptop (the Laptop is likely from 2008 given the article i have seen online that reviewed it was dated 2008) for only $20 earlier this month, wiped the drive, and put Windows 7 on it (“activated” it) and then upgraded to Windows 10 and i can confirm it works. then once i confirmed Win10 was activated with the Laptop i then clean installed Windows 10 and all is a good as you simply skip the screen that asks for key info etc and once your online it will automatically activate.

just make sure to download the ISO file using the official Microsoft tool so you can use that for future clean installs.

but that free upgrade will only work til the end of this year. once Jan 1st 2018 hits… Windows 10 will no longer be free. but anything you activate before Jan 1st 2018 will continue to work.

if you paid $39.5 for Windows 10… someone screwed you.