Windows 10 Anniversary Update

vbimport

#1

Thought I’d start this thread in case anyone wants to report issues, or just tell others they’ve had no problems in the update.

So far the only thing I’ve run into is that the update wiped out my Windows 7 games, and I had to find a new installer for them. They really don’t want you using the old versions without the ads. But some of us are stubborn. :slight_smile:


#2

Oh, by the way, I’ve spent a fair amount of time getting the privacy settings restored to where I want them, and changing some of the default programs that Windows 10 changed.


#3

Oh, by the way, I’ve spent a fair amount of time getting the privacy settings restored to where I want them, and changing some of the default programs that Windows 10 changed.

If you have already done the leg work Kerry, why don’t you let us know what you did?:iagree::clap:


#4

As I’ve mentioned bits and pieces of in other threads concerning the 1607 release:

The link to the tool posted by Dee to force the update will not work for the Enterprise edition and so my hunch is that it is strictly for the home and professional version.

The Windows 10 Pro simply blazed through the upgrade in 20 minutes or so and was done with it, absolutely no troubles at all.
Now that is more of a test computer, one I set up for use with this forum and so there are no special installs apart from Office 2016, a few tools to make working with registry and text easier. Oh, and of course O&O shutup10.

Now, my Enterprise edition main hobby computer is more prone to break as it is set up not to report anything anywhere and so it was with some doubts I started the upgrade last night. As I mentioned in another thread, I call this computer Fort Knox for fun (it is not its name in windows though). Furthermore it has way more than 2000 programs and utilities as that is where I do my ‘hobby’ work with PE files and reviving old games for yet another round in a new OS.

The upgrade itself went without any challenges or faults of any kind and when it booted into Windows after upgrade I was actually thinking they got it right for once.
I noticed that svchost.exe suddenly asked for access to port 53 and port 68, but thought ok, DNS/DHCP is O.K. and added the rules to my firewall and all seemed to work fine, more on that later below.

Then I fired up a couple of games from the late 90s and they started up without any challenges being detecte. GREAT I thought and entered the forum to spread the word… And went to bed.

As it turns out that was a little too early to start the celebration:
Of course, as Kerry mentions, the privacy settings must be tweaked again, but personally I simply used O&O Shutup10’s “Apply all recommended and limited recommended settings”, and then I turned on “Sending URLs from apps to Windows Store disabled” in addition
Still, we’re so used to M$ resetting this at their convenience and our inconvenience ever so often and so it is hardly worth mentioning anymore.
The same goes for default programs apart from that part being a little better this time around as I so far have only noticed Internet ‘Exploder’ taking over as default browser
There were a few services turned on too, like ‘IP Helper’, ‘DNS Client’, ‘Geolocation service’, ‘Program Compatibility Assistant Service’ of which I all had set to disabled as I do not need them running.

Then I notice a few more which seems to be new and have to investigatet further…

CDPUsrSvc_###
MessagingService_###
Sync Host_###
User Data Acces_###
User Data Storage_###
Windows Push Notification User Service_###

Now the ### is a variable hex formatted number. This I know since deleting them from the registry causes them to be recreated with a different hex number at the end. Can’t say I did notice them before the upgrade. They all have the same in common… You can stop and start them, but not change startup type as that gives you a ‘The parameter is incorrect’ error.
Now, I am no easy quitter and so I went to the registry and disabled them directly by setting startup type 4 manually and then rebooted. Guess what, they disappeared from services and the Start menu seems to sort of break as a result (no icon for settings though it could be started from the now blank spot which is the pinned entry on my task bar. In other words, it works but became hidden as a result)

I had to check of course and indeed, even the Pro edition has these entries but with a different hex number.

[B]Then I noticed I was unable to access a share on the computer!!![/B]
As it turns out, Microsoft probably figured I have way to many restrictions in my firewall and in a subtle but malicious move, they removed all Microsoft entries. Yes that is correct, ALL Microsoft rules, not a single one of mine (kind of reminds of the fact that they remove ‘New Text document’ from the ‘New’ menu when you switch from Notepad to a decent text editor). This left me with no networking apart from being able to browse the net because of the two rules added yesterday (on second thought, I think they left the disabled Microsoft ‘@…’ rules in there).
Probably, they do this in an effort to force the user to reinstate default rules to regain control of the computer’s networking… :a

[B]Close, but no cigar![/B] I do not call it Fort Knox for nothing and the computer features a double telemetry and other reporting block, FQDN by hosts and single IPs and IP ranges by firewall. Most any program not used explicitly to access the net is blocked and the firewall has been changed to ‘Outbound connections’ ‘Block’ by default to encompass new installs and updates trying to access the net. Furthermore, there is no network access on startup until I manually enable it after Windows is fully booted and I am logged in.
Naturally, with the amount of privacy and security work I have put into this computer (Years of paranoia :bigsmile:), I would hate to lose it and so I routinely made an image backup as well as complete backup my firewall config and registries before doing the upgrade :iagree:

It pays off being cautious, restore firewall rules took 5 seconds and nothing lost :disagree:


#5

[QUOTE=beef barley;2778878]If you have already done the leg work Kerry, why don’t you let us know what you did?:iagree::clap:[/QUOTE]

I’m not nearly as thorough as Xercus. I did a custom install of the new update so that I could uncheck all the boxes where they tried to make certain programs the default.

Once installed I also used O&O Shutup10 to reset the recommended options. This took two times to stick, rebooting between efforts, in order to shut down all the telemetry entries in O&O.

Microsoft insists that you use Photos, which I don’t particularly like. Its difficult to change to Windows Photo Viewer for some types of files, but with a little persistence I get there.

Then I removed every extraneous program I could from the Start Menu, just to have fewer of the ones I don’t use show up in the list. Getting rid of all the newer ones means hacking the registry, and the benefit is not worth the time. I’ll just ignore them.

Edit: One other thing. I had to reset Windows Update so that it would not automatically update drivers. I had issues with this before, so I made sure to change this.


#6

I just updated 2 of my builds to the Anniversary Edition and believe it or not it actually fixed an issue I was having. Skype would not shutdown with the computer, I had to manually shutdown Skype and then the rest of the computer. A while back Xercus taught me how make a Shutdown.exe tab for my taskbar that shutdown the whole computer successfully, but it was not the way its supposed to work, I needed Xercus to do what Microsoft should have done in about 50 updates. Now with this new edition, it works the way its supposed to. :wink:


#7

This is great stuff folks, thank you and keep it coming. That shutdown.exe sounds really interesting, I would think for those occasions when something just freezes up on a machine, any machine. Is it a lot better than having to do a hard shutdown?


#8

[QUOTE=beef barley;2778936]This is great stuff folks, thank you and keep it coming. That shutdown.exe sounds really interesting, I would think for those occasions when something just freezes up on a machine, any machine. Is it a lot better than having to do a hard shutdown?[/QUOTE]

Just a thread with a few ways to shut down your computer including forcing a program to shut down to be able to execute the shutdown properly. You can read the thread here if you like. To answer your question, a hard shutdown is prone to get you into trouble over time and so yes, the thread’s solutions are a better option.

I have a little more information about the new services

[B]CDPUsrSvc[/B] Seems to be derived from CDPSvc which been around since Windows XP. CDPSvc is still present in the registry along with both CDPUsrSvc entries, but only CDPUsrSvc_### shows up in services.

[B]MessagingService[/B] Service responsible for sending messages via apps/mobile phone

[B]Sync Host[/B] Service for OneDrive. synchronizes mail, contacts, calendar and various other user data.

[B]User Data Access[/B] Grants Windows Store and other apps access to User Data.

[B]User Data Storage[/B] Grants Windows Store and other apps access to Storage Information and access permissions.

[B]Windows Push Notification User Service[/B] (WNS) enables third-party developers to send toast, tile, badge, and raw updates from their own cloud service.

The two User Data services seems to be responsible for breaking the Start menu…
What I have not found info on so far is why the variable number at the end and two entries for each service in registry instead of just one entry without the number.

Another thing which puzzles me is why the same hexadecimal number for all six services and not just a random number for each. This is a natural question as I wonder if this number can be used as an extra to positively identify the computer of sorts. If that is the case, a script deleting them at shutdown would be needed, but it is way to early to conclude in this respect. Hopefully I will get a little time in between social activities this weekend to slaughter a few virtual installs in the process of gaining knowledge in this respect :bigsmile:


#9

With me, it switched the setting ‘Turn on fast start-up’ back on yet again.

That setting is a right pain with dual boot where the operating systems are on separate hard disks. When I had dual boot Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 on my laptop each on separate SSDs (second in the ODD bay), I got caught out when a Windows 10 update re-enabled the fast start-up setting. Fast start-up does not dismount the file systems when Windows is shut down (as it’s really a semi-hibernated shutdown), so when I booted into Windows 8.1, it did a Check Disk due to falsely detecting an improper shutdown. So when I later booted into Windows 10, it destroyed the file system of the Windows 8.1 SSD due to still having the SSD mounted from its semi-hibernated state.

Surprisingly this update seems to have kept my file extensions intact, e.g. jpg, mp3, mp4, pdf, etc. I’ve lost count of the number of times these file extensions were changed back to the Windows defaults.


#10

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2778899]I’m not nearly as thorough as Xercus.[/QUOTE]

Thank you for the kind words :flower:, I didn’t notice until now. I would say that makes two of us though… It just so happens I need to know these things while I’m a novice in your field of excellence not even knowing what program to use to record my webcam :bigsmile:

[QUOTE=Seán;2778946]With me, it switched the setting ‘Turn on fast start-up’ back on yet again.

That setting is a right pain with dual boot where the operating systems are on separate hard disks. When I had dual boot Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 on my laptop each on separate SSDs (second in the ODD bay), I got caught out when a Windows 10 update re-enabled the fast start-up setting. Fast start-up does not dismount the file systems when Windows is shut down (as it’s really a semi-hibernated shutdown), so when I booted into Windows 8.1, it did a Check Disk due to falsely detecting an improper shutdown. So when I later booted into Windows 10, it destroyed the file system of the Windows 8.1 SSD due to still having the SSD mounted from its semi-hibernated state.

Surprisingly this update seems to have kept my file extensions intact, e.g. jpg, mp3, mp4, pdf, etc. I’ve lost count of the number of times these file extensions were changed back to the Windows defaults.[/QUOTE]

My experience seems to be the same apart from dual-boot which I have not done in years and here it did not turn on fast-boot (I use the ODD bay for a 1TB drive in my laptop myself).
Still it kept all associations except for the aforementioned web browser.

Isn’t it remarkable how hard it is for Microsoft to save the settings when doing updates/upgrades and reinstate them afterwards? It is simply so far down lamer avenue I’m having a hard time finding words to describe it :confused:
Like I mention above, we have become so used to it, it’s hardly interesting to mention it. We should assume they screw it up, but still it seem to be at random what settings they mess up for the user. Like Kerry mentions, he struggles with his associations and we don’t. Howcome? Didn’t Microsoft do the same upgrade for him? I’m inclined to ask Kerry what version he is on :bigsmile:

I will probably spam this thread ever so often at least to begin with double posts and all, but I hope the information I bring in will be interesting enough to make it bearable for the rest of you :flower:

All the 12 registry entries for the above 6 services (with the hex number and without) can be set to “Start”=dword:00000003 or simply 3 to make them manual and they will not start when booting the PC/Laptop. This makes them stick in the Services console and this will not break the start menu (go figure).

The trouble started with insider build 14376 and has not been fixed and so you will have to change the startup type directly in registry, simply search for [B]C:\WINDOWS\system32\svchost.exe -k UnistackSvcGroup[/B] or navigate to [B]HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services[/B] and you will find them. Do your needed changes and reboot or stop the services manually in the Services console. keep in mind though that Sync Host is named OneSyncSvc in the registry.

Another thing I’ve noted which is of interest is that the hexadecimal numer changes on every reboot and so I got reeeeeally interested :wink: I checked the registries in a Windows 10 Enterprise LTSB and indeed, there are two entries for the services present, but there the other entry is named [B]OneSyncSvc_Session1[/B] and not [B]OneSyncSvc_1b8ab[/B] or something like that. This in turn leaves me to believe that this is actually a security feature in an effort to make the services harder to attack. It still seems somewhat lame as it won’t take too much time to code a wildcard search for these as you can use the built in functions of the OS to do the work for you.

The fact that you can’t change startup type from the services.msc console is of course nothing but a bug :disagree:


#11

I’ve had a mixed experience with this update. It went smoothly with my main PC, but failed on both an old laptop and on a Lenovo Stick PC - both of which had been running Windows 10 just fine.

On the laptop it almost completed the update - but then failed to update one of the components and rolled back to the previous version. The Stick PC update would not run because there was insufficient space. So I did a clean up and the built in advisor said the space was then OK - but the update would still not run because of insufficient space (contradicting itself).

Googling suggests plenty of people are having problems. I think I’ll wait a while before attempting the updates again in the hope that Microsoft or others will find fixes.


#12

[QUOTE=Xercus;2778949]This in turn leaves me to believe that this is actually a security feature in an effort to make the services harder to attack. It still seems somewhat lame as it won’t take too much time to code a wildcard search for these as you can use the built in functions of the OS to do the work for you.[/QUOTE]

On second thought, it would probably give extra protection from threats originating from the outside of the computer.

After making the above mentioned services manual and so not start, I have spent the morning hours checking what network traffic is escaping ‘Fort Knox’ after the upgrade. I am pleased to inform you that the result when applying a machine-in-the-middle attack and using WireShark shows absolute zero. In other words, the new update does not seem to employ any new technologies for reporting and telemetry. Windows Explorer (explorer.exe) seems desperate to connect to the DNS server, probably to be able to contact Microsoft, but the process is limited to access only my own LAN excluding the DNS server address and have no business outside of my LAN. If you do not limit it however, it will contact Microsoft on the web.

I have been thinking of trying to tell you all exactly what communication and what data are transmitted from a vanilla Windows 10 Pro, but have to find a reasonable traffic analyzer to make reading it easier. Capturing all network traffic (not only IP) in WireShark makes for a tremendously big log and a task I simply will not take on given the limited tools available in the application.


#13

I have read all the pros and cons of the New Anniversary Edition, all I know is that it works perfectly and it fixed a few things that I was having issues with, IMHO, this is the best most stable OS that Microsoft ever put out.:wink:


#14

My only big complaint is that it installs a lot of drivers and I had to reinstall a few to the versions I had before the update.


#15

One small info not too interesting for most, but still. There is no RS1 for the Enterprise LTSB editions (Long Term Servicing Branch). The next LTSB will as far as I have found out be built on RS2 coming next year.

For the ones not knowing out there, the Enterprise LTSB edition does not come with Windows Store or any other bloat. The Enterprise N LTSB edition does not even include Windows Media Player technology. Each LTSB edition will be supported for 10 years and will not get feature updates, only security updates.
While not being bloated like the ordinary versions, it still features telemetry collection.


#16

Well you got to have some fun. Today I came to think of an old Lenovo X200 (Intel GM45 chipset) I have laying around which was installed with Windows 7 Pro. Now that is a Core2Duo P8600 supporting a mere 4GB RAM of which only 2GB was installed and I thought; suppose I give that 4GB, a SSD and give it a shot, but since it was built as early as in November 2008 I didn’t think it would work.
After upgrading the BIOS, swapping the two 1GB memory modules for two 2GB I freed a retired Intel 320 series 160GB SSD from its USB enclosure and copied the harddisk onto it.

I didn’t think of trying to run the 1607 directly (which I already regret) so I started with the original 2015 edition and did the upgrade. It worked flawlessly so why not I thought, ran a few updates and started the upgrade to 1607. Not any problems at all.

It actually feels quick without delay and seems a fine small form factor laptop for day to day simple surfing/work for someone until it dies what we may call a natural death sometime in the near or distant future. I will give it to someone who needs a computer with a small note that the SSD probably has a year left to live :iagree:

Edit, Office 2010 works flawlessly in the latest 1607 edition as well.


#17

Now, as mentioned here, the anniversary update did re-enable Superfetch which I simply disabled.

The odd part though, is that the latest Intel SSD Toolbox recommend you keep it on!? (It is Windows 10, 1607. Not 8 as stated) Imo, absolute rubbish…



#18

This thread is good reading folks.

Well you got to have some fun. Today I came to think of an old Lenovo X200 (Intel GM45 chipset) I have laying around which was installed with Windows 7 Pro. Now that is a Core2Duo P8600 supporting a mere 4GB RAM of which only 2GB was installed and I thought; suppose I give that 4GB, a SSD and give it a shot, but since it was built as early as in November 2008 I didn’t think it would work.
I found this interesting because we have a Toshiba Satellite L300 about the same age that I have been going back and forth on installing XP or giving up one of the 2 W7 Ultimate installs that we have to put on it. I know they are 2 entirely different machines, (I will post the specs later) but how was the W7 install?

The specs:

Mobile Intel 4 Series Express Chipset Family. Pentium Dual Core CPU T4200 @ 2.00 GHz. 3 GBs of RAM.


#19

Being that the W7 was installed on a 7200RPM HD, it was way slower, but still O.K. as far as speed goes. The P8600 is a little quicker (3MB L2 Cache, 2.40 GHz, 1066 MHz FSB) than yours (1MB L2 Cache, 2.00 GHz, 800 MHz FSB) but they are still comparable. As long as you back up the original install, why not try… The worst outcome is failure :wink:

I wonder if I should try a Pentium 4 :bigsmile:

EDIT: As a follow up to my post about no LTSB version for RS1 above, I was mistaken. The LTSB is already released to OEMs and should be made available to corporations later this fall. That’s what you get when trusting non official sources :o


#20

[QUOTE=Xercus;2779568]Being that the W7 was installed on a 7200RPM HD, it was way slower, but still O.K. as far as speed goes. The P8600 is a little quicker (3MB L2 Cache, 2.40 GHz, 1066 MHz FSB) than yours (1MB L2 Cache, 2.00 GHz, 800 MHz FSB) but they are still comparable. As long as you back up the original install, why not try… The worst outcome is failure :wink:

I wonder if I should try a Pentium 4 :bigsmile:

EDIT: As a follow up to my post about no LTSB version for RS1 above, I was mistaken. The LTSB is already released to OEMs and should be made available to corporations later this fall. That’s what you get when trusting non official sources :o[/QUOTE]

Thank you.