Win.7 Full or upgrade

vbimport

#1

I have a real newbie question. I have had my Win 7 disk for some time, and don’t remember if it is a full install or upgrade. On the disk it has the words, Upgrade, and under that "Includes Anytime upgrade"I have used this disk to re-install my system and was give the choice of Upgrade Or Full, so I assume it to be full install, know it sounds stupid, but I want to be sure as I need it for a program that requires a full install Win.7 and this does not seem to work, of course it could be something else, just trying to eliminate all problems. Thanks,
Jim


#2

Upgrade is upgrade…I doubt that is a full install dvd. Only way to tell is if it has a COA call M$ and verify with them the COA and they can tell you exactly what version you have. Another test would be to boot from the DVD and see if you get a option to do a full install and if not then you only have a upgrade.


#3

A Windows 7 upgrade DVD will actually go through a clean install process, but the product key will not activate.

There is a workaround - Do a clean installation, but skip the step where it asks for the product key. Next, run that Windows 7 setup disc again and this time choose the ‘Upgrade’ option and let it go through the process and then provide the product key when requested. This should activate fine.

With Windows 8 it seems to work a bit different. I bought the Windows 8 upgrade before the promotion ended in January. I did a clean installation, but ran into a problem where Windows Update kept crashing. I also noticed that it wouldn’t activate, but then again I was going to use the registry loophole later. Anyway, I went through the Windows 8 installation process again, deleted the partitions within setup so it does a full install again, but this time when it completed, Windows automatically activated.

So for Windows 8 upgrade I suspect that as long as it sees an existing Windows folder structure, it will activate fine even if the partition is deleted or formatted to perform a clean full install during set up. It’s quite possible Windows 7 will do the same, but I don’t have an upgrade product key to try.


#4

You can also just change a registry key to activate after a clean install with an upgrade DVD:
HKLM/Software/Microsoft/Windows/CurrentVersionsetup/OOBE/mediabootinstall
If the value is set to 0 change it to 1 or the other way round.


#5

I think Sean’s version is what’s been successfully. A clean install then a pseudo wipe-out and installing on top of whatever was left behind, all depending on that Activation Key.

I hope Durk will check back in and give us the final answer on this effort, and I hope it’s good news.


#6

Most “Upgrade” discs will do a full install, because in certain cases a "full install"
is required.

Certain “upgrades” are blocked.

x86 (32-Bit) to X64 (64-bit) for obvious reasons.

If you are upgrading an XP system.

If you are starting with Vista Business and attempting to
upgrade to Windows7 Home… etc…

And sometimes your old installation is so completely screwed
up that anything other than a full “clean” install won’t work right.

an Upgrade installation can be launched from within your old
operating system by inserting the disc and launching the installer.

on a “full” install you must boot from the disc.

Personally I prefer running an installer on a freshly formatted Hard Drive
Preferably formatted with the installation disc.

But I also like to separate the old hard drive from the process just in case
there is data you decide you need… I usually wait at least six months
before formatting a personal drive, customer drives I wait as long as
nine months to a year.

I am also adept at data recovery, particularly when dealing with pictures,
audio and video data.


#7

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2687150]Most “Upgrade” discs will do a full install, because in certain cases a "full install"
is required.

Certain “upgrades” are blocked.

x86 (32-Bit) to X64 (64-bit) for obvious reasons.

If you are upgrading an XP system.

If you are starting with Vista Business and attempting to
upgrade to Windows7 Home… etc…

And sometimes your old installation is so completely screwed
up that anything other than a full “clean” install won’t work right.

an Upgrade installation can be launched from within your old
operating system by inserting the disc and launching the installer.

on a “full” install you must boot from the disc.

Personally I prefer running an installer on a freshly formatted Hard Drive
Preferably formatted with the installation disc.

But I also like to separate the old hard drive from the process just in case
there is data you decide you need… I usually wait at least six months
before formatting a personal drive, customer drives I wait as long as
nine months to a year.

I am also adept at data recovery, particularly when dealing with pictures,
audio and video data.[/QUOTE]Alan thanks for the reply, I am not a newbie , but certainly not a pro, I have never completely formatted a disk from the start and then re-installed afresh, I have many Win disks dating back to Win 95, but most of my recent are Xp thru Win7, and are all upgrades, if I had to buy a full install I will, what is needed to make a clean install?


#8

Great information folks.
I always appreciate the inputs.
That is why I’m still here after all these years.

An upgrade will usually create a “Window.old” folder on the root drive, which can later be eliminated via the “Disk Cleanup” process.

I always physically disconnect any other hard drives in the system until the Windows installation is finalized. This prevents the installation from dumping on the other drives (Boot Files, Pagefiles, etc,.)

@Liggy
That’s a new wrinkle for me. Never knew that.
I’ll certainly try that.

Thanks


#9

[QUOTE=Seán;2685893]A Windows 7 upgrade DVD will actually go through a clean install process, but the product key will not activate.

There is a workaround - Do a clean installation, but skip the step where it asks for the product key. Next, run that Windows 7 setup disc again and this time choose the ‘Upgrade’ option and let it go through the process and then provide the product key when requested. This should activate fine.

With Windows 8 it seems to work a bit different. I bought the Windows 8 upgrade before the promotion ended in January. I did a clean installation, but ran into a problem where Windows Update kept crashing. I also noticed that it wouldn’t activate, but then again I was going to use the registry loophole later. Anyway, I went through the Windows 8 installation process again, deleted the partitions within setup so it does a full install again, but this time when it completed, Windows automatically activated.

So for Windows 8 upgrade I suspect that as long as it sees an existing Windows folder structure, it will activate fine even if the partition is deleted or formatted to perform a clean full install during set up. It’s quite possible Windows 7 will do the same, but I don’t have an upgrade product key to try.[/QUOTE]

Been using that method for windows 7 Pro on my PC for the last year. A little more hassle when doing an install but the extra $70 in my wallet tells me it was worth it. Basically you install windows twice (clean install and then upgrade).


#10

Its actually very easy to use the upgrade version of Windows 8 to do a full install, you just need to format at a certain point in the installation.


#11

I for myself went a full install dvd disk rather then upgrade hassle. It takes more less time as you only have to worry about only one O/S to install and update and customize to your need. Plus you get a new COA for that full install and never have to worry did I loose my old COA or it did it get blacklisted…


#12

I chose the upgrade as well.

Did a clean Windows 7 installation and popped the Windows 8 Upgrade disk in as soon as it booted to the desktop. Did not have to activate Windows 7.

Time was not a factor as the install was on an SSD.


#13

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2687308]I for myself went a full install dvd disk rather then upgrade hassle. It takes more less time as you only have to worry about only one O/S to install and update and customize to your need. Plus you get a new COA for that full install and never have to worry did I loose my old COA or it did it get blacklisted…[/QUOTE]

Forgot to mention it was with W7x64 Ult Sp1…


#14

I have found that format and install always works best! Updating does miss a few things along the way.


#15

My personal advice is whatever kind of install you are doing with whatever disc that when that page comes up asking for the product code early in the install process press the button to “skip and enter the code later”

I have installed windows7 literally hundreds of times, and entering the code when prompted to has NEVER worked for me, not even once.

Entering the code and activating manually later works for me roughly one time in five. the other four times I’ve had to resort to activating with the automated phone system.