Will there be one DVD format?

vbimport

#1

Currently there are many different DVD formats on the market (DVD+R, DVD+RW, DVD-RAM, DVD-R, DVD-RW, DVD-ROM, etc.)

One of the factors that is preventing me from getting a DVD recorder is the lack of convergence of the formats. If I get one now, what happens if a single format is developed that is not backwards compatible with the current DVD recorders?

I need to know whether or not the DVD writing standards has matured yet.

I don’t want to buy a DVD writer and find out two weeks down the road that the industry is switched to DVD-XR!

Does anybody know if a single DVD format is being developed or not?


#2

No, there won’t be one unified format. But it is highly unlikely that any new formats that are on the same level as DVD will be developed either.

If you want support for all of these, just get an LG 4160 or 4163 drive. It supports everything and has very good burn quality as well. Though DVD-RAM is very unpopular outside of Japan, so it’s still pretty safe to get a drive that does not support it.

Also keep in mind that R, Rw, ROM and RAM all serve different purposes. It would be silly to merge these all into one format.

In 2005-06 the new generation of storage wars will start, and we will all get confused by Blu-Ray vs. HDDVD. This will be the next format war. (Companies are so stupid that they would rather confuse the customer and reduce their sales with multiple competing formats, than just have one single lone format that everybody supports.) These next gen technologies are not comparable with the current DVD technologies, and will require different hardware.

You can wait for years and years, there will always be something new over the horizon. Current DVD writers are quite inexpensive right now, and IMO it’s the right time to buy.


#3

post deleted by Jucius_Maximus


#4

I am glad, that today, we have both formats, and DVD-MultiRecorder drives, which support both formats.

Think AND and not EITHER-OR.

Unfortunately, BD and HD-DVD could not deal with each other.
BD has more space storage, but prone to physical damage due to the ugly position of the data layer, which is 100 µm away from the reflective surface, while DVD and HD-DVDs have 600µm of cushion from each side.

The thickness of a normal disc is 1200µm, while EcoDisc is 700µm.
A CD has 1100µm from the reflective side to spare, which means a fragile 100µm from the label side.

So, BluRay must really be produced robust from the data layer side. Scratches just need to be 100µm deep to reach the heart of the data for BD.