Will reading from cdrw damage it?

I hurd that reading from cdrws instead of cdroms and dvdroms that it will shorten its laser life.
Means of reading are not just for imaging but for normal use…
someone plz tell me it aint true…!!

i guess it has a degree of truth.

If you use your burner to read discs and write discs alot, then it won’t last as long due to the fact that its being used more

if you only write with it it will last longer.

But with new drives having a life expectancy of 70,000 hours or 7.9908677 years of use, i don’t think it much of a problem.

@kwkard

I have the same feeling so I don’t read from my burner unless it is necessary.

Its better to be safe.
:bigsmile:

only reason why i read from my ltr-48125w is because its the only 48x thing on my system

I see… I agree with darshanjog. I want these burners to last my life time

@kwkard

What CD-ROM/DVD-ROM do you have?

ive got a toshiba sd-r1002 dvd/cd-rw combo drive thats a 24 read. An external 8x burner converted to an internal with read speed of 32x.

And ive got a 56x cd-rom drive but its dead

But, day after tomorrow i get my cdrwf1 from ups:bigsmile:

'Cmon guys. So y’all each have 3 optical drives in system? DVDROM, CDROM, CDRW? It’s not gonna kill your drives reading a different format. If that’s true, there wouldn’t be DVD/CDRW combo drives.

Besides, by the time your current CDRWs wear out, there will be 100x blue ray drives available… unless your a hazard to your CDRW and breaks one every month for unexplained reasons.

Writing uses far more laser power than reading, and therefore writing usage is likely to have a much greater effect on laser life than reading.

If you want your burner to last a lifetime, use it only for reading, not writing.:cool:

Not only will this eliminate coasters, but in your will you can instruct the executor of your estate to donate it to a museum.:bigsmile:

or you could buy a top-of-the-line burner and never open it:)

Originally posted by Inertia
[B]Writing uses far more laser power than reading, and therefore writing usage is likely to have a much greater effect on laser life than reading.

If you want your burner to last a lifetime, use it only for reading, not writing.:cool:

Not only will this eliminate coasters, but in your will you can instruct the executor of your estate to donate it to a museum.:bigsmile: [/B]

Not if you compare reading & writing at max speed. the motor will burn out quickly if you constantly read at 48x (9000+ rpm). so using it just for writing at 48x would last longer since writing uses P-CAV, Z-CLV etc and doesnt have as much rpm.

one question that has bothered me is what will wreck your burner quicker, writing at speeds 40x+ or 8x and lower? slow writing leaves the laser on for longer but fast writing is more stressful but only for short periods. whats better??:confused:

maybe halfway at 24x, not sure if it really matters though.

LiteOn CDRWs are rated for 70K hours of operation w/ MOE of maybe 1K hours. So if you take the minimum, you still have 69K to work w/. Now, tell me, who the hell burns and reads CDs 69K hours straight? That’s close to 8 years. Like I said earlier, will you be using the same LiteOn CDRW 8 years from now? Blue Ray’s around the corner, so it’ll probably be available to consumers next year, 12 months the most. So stop freaking out and make your CDRW work its ass off reading and writing and get what you paid for.

Originally posted by cd pirate
[B]

Not if you compare reading & writing at max speed. the motor will burn out quickly if you constantly read at 48x (9000+ rpm). so using it just for writing at 48x would last longer since writing uses P-CAV, Z-CLV etc and doesnt have as much rpm.[/b]

Writing at 48x with the Lite-on LTR-48125W and other late models uses CAV right after the start, so the burner is operating at a constant top speed for the entire burn with a much greater laser output than a reading operation. In other words, the reading and writing speeds are both 48x max CAV. I have no statistics for reference, but the great majority of burner (and CD-ROM) failures that I have seen are not due to motor failure. Failures are virtually always caused by laser (including a need for cleaning) or tracking mechanism problems. The greatest hazard of high speed reading is substandard media that can’t handle high speeds without potential problems.

It is true that leaving a reading device running at top speed for unlimited periods could cause a decrease in motor life. There are a couple of solutions to this in Nero Drive Speed. One is to set the spin-down time to a reasonable period so that if the drive is not being used it will become inactive. The other is to lower the maximum drive speed if extended reading is required. This a good practice whether the device is a burner or a CD-ROM, since the effects on motor life would be the same for both.

one question that has bothered me is what will wreck your burner quicker, writing at speeds 40x+ or 8x and lower? slow writing leaves the laser on for longer but fast writing is more stressful but only for short periods. whats better??:confused:

I don’t think there is a simple answer to this question. My feeling is that when a component fails it is usually due to an undetected fault which may eventually produce failure under any circumstances. In any event, nobody buys high speed burners in order to burn at low speeds. I have seen no reports and am unaware of a higher failure rate with high speed CD-RW devices. I would just burn at the fastest speed that your burner and media can support without errors and not be concerned. Chances are you will buy a new burner for some added features before your replaced burner fails.

lmao if youre worrying about killing a drive that will be obsolete in less than 18 months then you might want to avoid turning your computer on too bc it erodes all the circuts in the electronics everytime they get activated at all

You’re right - the riskiest moment is when you first turn on the pc, that’s when power spikes are most likely to take out components, so, if you’re really concerned, you should leave it running all the time! Me, I turn mine off when I’m not there as I don’t trust the little sucker!

As for the burner wearing out, that thought never even occurred to me. I’m on my 3rd. burner in as many years; they’ve never failed, I’ve simply replaced them with a newer (cheaper) model that does what the other one wouldn’t, like handle SD2.5*.

So, don’ worry, be happy mon.

Originally posted by dik
[B]As for the burner wearing out, that thought never even occurred to me. I’m on my 3rd. burner in as many years; they’ve never failed, I’ve simply replaced them with a newer (cheaper) model that does what the other one wouldn’t, like handle SD2.5*.

So, don’ worry, be happy mon. [/B]

im just a little paranoid. back in the old 8x days i knew people who wrecked their burners by writing at max speed all the time. but i guess your right because new writers have more features and are much cheaper. if it dies, just pay 120 bucks and get a new kickass one!:bigsmile:

why 120 bucks? the new 52x memorex writers are only like 80 bucks at best buy after rebate

$120 Australian dollars = about $66 U.S. dollars. A very good price. :bigsmile:

will reading from cdrw damage it?

No, i will take a wild shot in the dark now and make a guess that this is what the device was designed to do.