Will Pc accept a SSD disk?_BIOS_PLACE?What if buffer is full?

vbimport

#1

Hey

a MEDION ERAZER X7710 D ( MD 8888) A- BE with msn No. 10014165 (windows 7 ) has enough space and the hard drive needs replacement .

SSD drive will now come in handy .

But where should I look ? For example, I know that the SSD drives are smaller than the normal hard drives, so how can I install the SSD in the computer?

There is a laptop or a desktop kit on the Internet but when I google it, itis not clear to me of what it is all about. the laptop kit is something about a USB converter for a laptop, for desktop kit I have found no description.

I also found something about an upgrade kit: that has brackets and cables . Is this the same as a desktop kit ? Could the bracket be a solution to install the SSD drive in any PC?

I also read something about SSD drives that can get full or at least the buffer and then the SSD will be slower. Does this mean that I am responsible for emptying the SSD ?Is there not way to automatichally manage this?

and willthe medion pc accept the SSD drive? Maybe the BIOS is going to do difficult?

What should I check if the PC can handle a SSD disk


#2

[QUOTE=haramo;2711914]Hey

a MEDION ERAZER X7710 D ( MD 8888) A- BE with msn No. 10014165 (windows 7 ) has enough space and the hard drive needs replacement .

SSD drive will now come in handy .

But where should I look ? For example, I know that the SSD drives are smaller than the normal hard drives, so how can I install the SSD in the computer?

There is a laptop or a desktop kit on the Internet but when I google it, itis not clear to me of what it is all about. the laptop kit is something about a USB converter for a laptop, for desktop kit I have found no description.

I also found something about an upgrade kit: that has brackets and cables . Is this the same as a desktop kit ? Could the bracket be a solution to install the SSD drive in any PC?

I also read something about SSD drives that can get full or at least the buffer and then the SSD will be slower. Does this mean that I am responsible for emptying the SSD ?Is there not way to automatichally manage this?

and willthe medion pc accept the SSD drive? Maybe the BIOS is going to do difficult?

What should I check if the PC can handle a SSD disk[/QUOTE]
Most SSDs come with an adapter, 3.5 to 2.5" adapter. Makes it real easy to install.


#3

Hi,

Is this what you have:

http://aldi.medion.com/md8888_01/be_nl/?refPage=aldi

If so it will all be plug and play. The BIOS should be set to handle an SSD optimally from the get go. If that is what you have it looks like the chassis has a couple of 2,5" hotswap bays ready under the front bezel there. If not, there are numerous drives that comes with a 2.5" to 3-5" bracket, like Alan said.

To my experience, all Kingston SSDs comes with a bracket, and Samsung Evo’s are usually easy to spot in the title: If it says KW in it - it is a desktop kit with a bracket and an adapter cable to USB.

Kind regards,


#4

[QUOTE=Tweakr;2711919]Hi,

Is this what you have:

http://aldi.medion.com/md8888_01/be_nl/?refPage=aldi

If so it will all be plug and play. The BIOS should be set to handle an SSD optimally from the get go. If that is what you have it looks like the chassis has a couple of 2,5" hotswap bays ready under the front bezel there. If not, there are numerous drives that comes with a 2.5" to 3-5" bracket, like Alan said.

To my experience, all Kingston SSDs comes with a bracket, and Samsung Evo’s are usually easy to spot in the title: If it says KW in it - it is a desktop kit with a bracket and an adapter cable to USB.

Kind regards,[/QUOTE]

If the SSD doesn’t come with a bracket you can buy one on Amazon for about 6.00USD.


#5

[QUOTE=alan1476;2711923]If the SSD doesn’t come with a bracket you can buy one on Amazon for about 6.00USD.[/QUOTE]

Electrical tape cost <=1.00 USD


#6

Velcro works well.


#7

[QUOTE=Stereodude;2711970]Velcro works well.[/QUOTE]

Crazy Glue works also but would I use it , I think not, they make a part called an adapter for such a purpose, why jury rig a computer when the part that you need to do it right only is few bucks?:wink:


#8

(I’m going avoid the comments about finally finding a good recycling use for bubble-gum, despite the fact that it has good anti-vibration characteristics and, with the four corners mashed down into 4 blobs, it will harden into a sturdy holder, too. I’m not too certain it would prevent lift-off from those Zeppelin drives, though.)

Meanwhile, back at the ranch…

If this computer does NOT accept an SSD, boy… THAT would be a shock of the century. If it handles SATA drives, it will handle an SSD.

The bigger question is “How big is your C: Drive now, and are you going to clone it (to a same size or larger SSD) or are you going to re-load your operating system and programs for a clean, fresh start?”

(I bet Velco using SuperGlue would counteract those pesky lighter-than-air drives. Oh, the humanity…!)


#9

Is this what you have:

http://aldi.medion.com/md8888_01/be_nl/?refPage=aldi

If so it will all be plug and play.

Goal is to install at least Windows on it. how can the disk be plug and play?

The BIOS should be set to handle an SSD optimally from the get go. If that is what you have it looks like the chassis has a couple of 2,5" hotswap bays ready under the front bezel there. If not, there are numerous drives that comes with a 2.5" to 3-5" bracket, like Alan said.

under the front bezel: don’t understand this, is it inside the pc or the outside? I cheched inside, it seems the bays all have the same size(normal harddisk)

To my experience, all Kingston SSDs comes with a bracket, and Samsung Evo’s are usually easy to spot in the title: If it says KW in it - it is a desktop kit with a bracket and an adapter cable to USB.

Ok, Samsung uses KW to say that the bracket and adapter cable is included


#10

If this computer does NOT accept an SSD, boy… THAT would be a shock of the century. If it handles SATA drives, it will handle an SSD.

The bigger question is “How big is your C: Drive now, and are you going to clone it (to a same size or larger SSD) or are you going to re-load your operating system and programs for a clean, fresh start?”

yes, it handles SATA. so no problem to handle SSD.
I’m not intending to clone the C drive, but a fresh installation.

I have recovery discs which were included with the pc, but will windows 7 (home premium 64bit) recognize the SSD disk or do I need to load a driver?


#11

If you are able to do a clean install to a spinning HDD in your computer, you can do a clean install to the SSD without any extra drivers.

Do you have a way to do a clean installation?


#12

Your goal of a clean-install is a luxury, indeed. It’s practically fail-safe insurance.

When I am replacing the C: Drive with a clean-install new drive, I often just umplug the old C: Drive’s cables, leave it sitting in the case, and then connect the cables to the new hard-drive and complete the clean-install.

If something goes wrong, or I want to check some old setting, I simply swap the cables back to the original drive.

Eventually, I’ll connect the old hard-drive up as a 2nd hard-drive, then I’ll copy my DATA files off to the new drive, then reformat that old drive as a clean 2nd drive.


#13

It is HIGHLY recommended that before running the windows installation disc you verify the setting of the onboard SATA controller…

You need to go into setup and typically “advanced settings”, the setting you
are looking for is “AHCI” (Advanced Host Controller Interface) as this is the
preferred setting for SSD operation.

On most computers that have a SATA controller that has AHCI mode, you
will have nothing to do (a preferred situation), because it is typically the default setting.

an SSD will also work when the controller is set in RAID mode
(even if no RAID arrays are set up) so if AHCI mode is not an available
choice you should select RAID mode (RAID mode will be required if
you are intending to set up a RAID array of any kind.)