Will not play on most standalones?

vbimport

#1

Pulling my hair out trying to figure this problem out, sure hope someone can help. Here goes! I have a 2200 AMD Athlon processor, 512 Ram, 100Gig hard drive and I pioneer 105 dvd 4x dvd burner. When I use dvd x copy all disk play just fine on all standalone dvd players, when I use dvd2one,then burn with dvdtocopy I can only play finished movie on my cheap apex ad1200 dvd player and not on my toshiba,sony or audiovox dvd players. I have been searching messages on forum for tips and I have tried everything suggested so far, with the same results. Would greatly appreciate any new suggestions! Please :bow:


#2

I’ve heard that the cheapies sometimes more compatiable. My Panasonic DVD player will not play my VCDs (says it play VCDs right there on the front bezel) It plays my DVD-Rs ok. I carry one each of VCD and DVD-R in my pocket as I shop for a new DVD player. Gonna test them out before I buy next time.


#3

I’ve found that Pioneers are bullet proof for this.

My 545 has never balked at a single disc, whether it be DVD-R, DVD-RW, VCD, SVCD, CD, MP3 - and a partridge in a pear tree!

-Pete


#4

I had problems with playing DVD2One compressed movies on Sony players as well

The way I resolved this was by using IFOEdit to strip the streams.

A post somewhere on this fourm describes how to do this in detail but basically you open the IFO filea after DVD2One has finsihed processing withg IFO edit.

Go to Strip streams, select a target directory, select which audio streams you want to keep (usually all), then check all the Vob ID check boxes and run it

This, I have found, allows DVD2One compressed movies to play on all standalone players.


#5

Not sure what media you are using. I think after compessing with DVD2ONE it must make the disc more difficult to read. I use Ritek X4 silver top without labels (labels send discs off balance) and get great results.


#6

I would wager it’s your media and not Dvd2one.
What media are you using and what speed are you burning at ?

If it plays ok in your Apex standalone, then it’s reasonable to assume that all the files are in a VIDEO_TS directory and the format is good.

Have you started a new batch of media recently ? as not all players are as tolerant as the Apex.


#7

Thanks for all the replies. I am using ritek silver top,purple burn area. I will try to edit streams to see if this maybe the problem. I have not purchased dvd2one yet, still using the trial hoping I can find a solution and then purchase. Thanks again for all the suggestions.


#8

@ guestlady

You didn’t explain the procedure you are using, in any detail, so I am wondering if you are doings something different to me, as I have used DVD20ne on dozens of movies with no problems.
You shouldn’t need to edit streams or do anything other than rip and process through Dvd2one and then burn.

FWIW here is my method :

DVD Decrypter (in File Mode) to rip
Dvd20ne to process (set output to 4400)
Nero (latestversion) to burn, putting all files in VIDEO_TS folder and including an empty AUDIO_TS folder. This isn’t essential, but some old standalones expect to see it.

If you are using Ritek disks, you should be able to rely on these, but it’s not unheard of to get a bad batch.

Make sure if you are using Nero, to use the latest version, because some earlier versions did have a DVD Compliancy problem.


#9

IMHO :eek: Media makes or breaks whether my Sony tabletop will play a disc…and I would strongly suggest burning at a s l o w e r speed. That’s just what’s worked for me…


#10

Are you using NERO. NERO and I almost made a Frisbee factory, since I went to Record Now Max not a bad Disc. What helps one may hurt another.
justmy2cents
Dd

5 Standalones my Sony and Panasonics seem most picky for me.


#11

SUCCESS!:bigsmile: Finally figured out where I was going wrong? Somewhere, I read that when ripping files, I should select all and then rip in file mode, hence, this was my problem! I allowed the program to select the files and then proceeded with all other steps and BINGO, dvd’s played in all standalones. I would like to thank everyone:bow: especially Phil, for all the help.
Wonderful forum and I really enjoy reading all the hints.


#12

Well yes, indeed like mentioned somewhere before. DVD2one likes his data as raw as possible.

Just use whatever decryptor but don’t use the streamprocessing or you might end up with unwanted results.

(and Sony players are a bit picky, especially when it comes to media. My friends 735 only read pioneer 4x DVD-r, DVD-RW only the first time writen (erase == dead!) and nothing else… strange stuff)


#13

“DVD Decrypter (in File Mode) to rip
Dvd20ne to process (set output to 4400)”

Why so small?
I keep changing from 4452 through 4468, mostly depending on my having just read of all-around success with 4472, or lowering when I read more conservative suggestions (like yours).
In general, I have 100% success regardless size and even now that I am using 2x speed burning with my A05/hacked fw with all kinds of cheap 1x media (Ritek/LeadData/Accu/etc.).
I rather wish I could just ‘set to 4472’ and ‘forget’–but I’m worried about trouble down-the-line and finding coasters in my burns.
What is the favored way to ‘acid test’ burns for quality (other than running around to varied players and watching whole movie-only burns with a critical eye)? Is there any utility that one can actually trust for checking the first output from a media-batch/fw or speed change/D2O update?
What do the developers of D2O and/or other savvy users depend on when testing for quality when updating or trying new brands/batches? Procedures?


#14

@ loggy

4400mb for the output size is recommended by ReneB, as this has been found to be a good size, for all round success.

It’s by no means hard and fast, but it can help avoid problems on certain media, when the dye is not spread evenly to the extremeties of the disk. By leaving a little space at the outer edge, of the disk, seems to cure this.

Sometimes standalone players have trouble reading the extremeties of the disk also, so it’s a good compromise, given that 72 mb is unlikely to degrade the movie quality very much at all.


#15

Sony’s seem very fussy on DVD structure and if it ain’t been ripped right in the first place or has been modified previous to processing incorrectly then some Sony’s will simply refuse to play the DVD

I think it’s some sort of copy protection feature cos they know that people will mess up with backups on some occasions

the Sony also doesn’t like the lighter dye DVD’s (ain’t the problem here tho) or any that have files missing or incorrect DVD structures. I’ve got a Sony :p, but I’m extra careful and everything’s been fine apart from the 1st time I realised it was fussy

burning at slower speeds is rubbish, if it don’t play when burnt at max speed but does when burnt slower simply means your media ain’t upto it

and I burn at 4X using the full 4489MB and never get any sticking/jumping/artifacts regarding the data near the end of the DVD

:EDIT: LOL, just seen the problem is solved, just like I thought, incorrect rip which resulted in an incorrect DVD structure after processing with DVD2One, 95% of the time it’s never the backup tool that’s to blame but 95% of the time it’s hard trying to show that :slight_smile:


#16

Quote:
“burning at slower speeds is rubbish, if it don’t play when burnt at max speed but does when burnt slower simply means your media ain’t upto it”

Ethos -ethos - ethos!

Rubbish is simply your opinion and has no bearing on fact.


#17

Originally posted by Phil Thomas
@ loggy
4400mb for the output size is recommended by ReneB, as this has been found to be a good size, for all round success.
It’s by no means hard and fast, but it can help avoid problems on certain media, when the dye is not spread evenly to the extremeties of the disk. By leaving a little space at the outer edge, of the disk, seems to cure this.
Sometimes standalone players have trouble reading the extremeties of the disk also, so it’s a good compromise, given that 72 mb is unlikely to degrade the movie quality very much at all.
What is the favored way to ‘acid test’ burns for quality (other than running around to varied players and watching whole movie-only burns with a critical eye)? Is there any utility that one can actually trust for checking the first output from a media-batch/fw or speed change/D2O update?
What do the developers of D2O and/or other savvy users depend on when testing for quality when updating or trying new brands/batches? Procedures?

I didn’t know that ReneB favored 4400 (wonder why the default comes as 4472?), but see the logic behind such. Media quality (at least within the ‘affordable’ brands/off-brands/re-badges) is luck-of-draw, particularly near edges. Presumably, I’ve been lucky to date with hacked A05 2xAll FW–as I haven’t visually detected any real problems as yet using diverse 1x media. However, as I quoted above, I would like a guide/recommend for some scanning utility to affirm quality before amassing a collection that later proves “iffy”. 4400 seems just a bit conservative, but I’ll pass on the full 4472 for now.
Again, what do others check for burn quality with?


#18

admittedly, maybe rubbish is a bit harsh

but prove to me that burning on a good media that is capable of burning at that speed on a computer with enough resources needs to be burnt at a slower speed?

take a look at this thread HERE and you will see poor example burns even at 1X

I’ve just ran DVDSpeed and look at my pic here of a full to the brim 4489MB (4.3837Gb) DVD burnt using NERO(another so called no go area) at 4X using the 105 and unbranded ritek G04 (dark dye) and that’s what it’s like for every burn and I got the same results when I had a 104 using Ritek G03

download results file HERE

I make sure my DVD is spotless also by cleaning it before burning cos even a piece of dust can affect the burn and most DVD blanks wil have at least one speck of dust on them even when they are sealed and some have even more. You will also be surprised how some people don’t realise this and manhandle the blanks creating even more possibilities of contaminating the blank cos DVD’s are much more sensitive to dust etc than CD-R’s during burning

if you look closely enough in the light after you have burnt you can see the bits where it does not burn due to contamination on the DVD surface that was there during the burn and this I learnt in the beginning and now my DVD’s are perfect when the come out cos they are spotless when I put them in

the other thing that can affect burning at high speed is the system resources. If when burning a strain is put on the system resources this may also have an effect on the burn as data may not be transferred efficiently even if there is a buffer

so I’ll let you prove to me that burning at slower speeds is better rather than me rubbishing that theory. Also the theory for saving space at the outer edge of the disc for some people is again probably again a combination of system resources and poor media
:slight_smile:

maybe now you will see my reasons why I was a bit strong in saying the theory was rubbish

is that not fair then :slight_smile:

Originally posted by menher
Rubbish is simply your opinion and has no bearing on fact.
maybe I shudda wrote “burning at a low speed will be a safer way for people with poorer quality media and lower system resources to use to ensure a high quality burn


#19

@ MackemX

Agreed, if you are using grade a media, such as Riteks, then why not push them a bit harder and, if it works for you … fine.

But not everyone uses the best and what ReneB was trying to do was suggest a figure whereby most folk would avoid problems, especially on cheaper media.

I think his logic is sound and allows a margin for error. Lets face it, if your car can do 100mph, that’s gr8, but it’s not obligatory to drive it at that speed is it ? and it’s far more likely that something will blow, if you do, so at the end of the day it’s what’s best for you.

Also, remember that one day you may own a different standalone and they dont all like to read the far reaches of dvdr’s.


#20

Hi all,

I’m using DVD2One in combination with Nero 5.5.10.20 and a (dell) ND-1100A. My SA is a Sony DVP-NS405.

All movies (>50) I burned on +R (using different media including the cheaper Platinum and Datawrite) work w/o a problem on the SA (also tested on an X-Box and PS-2’s) Even +RW’s work fine on the SA (I known, the 405 supports +RW media by default)

Now, is it my perception that more problems, relating to dye/disc quality are found when using -R/-RW, compared to +R/+RW? Or is it the combination of disc-type and writing-speed thats more the determining factor. I never had to change from 4472 to 4400 or lower because of outer-edge quality-problems on +R/+RW…

No intention to start a Minus/Plus war here, whatsoever, just purely interested in the overall disc-quality of both.

Any feedback appreciated.

Marcher