Widescreen Conversion to Full?

vbimport

#1

Hey there guys. I’ve been looking around for a program that can convert those stupid Widescreen movie formats into something more pleasing like Fullscreen. Unfourtunately, all I’ve been able to find are programs that ‘squish’ the image in, and crop off insane amounts of the footage from the left and right sides. Surely there must be something that does this, otherwise, how does the recording industry come out with Fullscreen editions of movies.

I wish they’d just stop making Widescreen anyway. I mean, whats the percentage of the population that has a widescreen TV compared to those who own normal 4:3’s? Surely they’d make more money off producing Fullscreen DVD’s en mass, and making 1/10th the number of widescreen copies.

If anyone knows of the program that the industry uses, or one that works on the same principals, please let me know.


#2

Quote:

“Hey there guys. I’ve been looking around for a program that can convert those stupid Widescreen movie formats into something more pleasing like Fullscreen. Unfourtunately, all I’ve been able to find are programs that ‘squish’ the image in, and crop off insane amounts of the footage from the left and right sides. Surely there must be something that does this, otherwise, how does the recording industry come out with Fullscreen editions of movies.”

they do it by cutting off portions of the picture. that is what " this movie has been modified to fit your screen" means. the popularity of Widescreen is due to people who want to see the film just as it was released in the theatres without having portions of the picture cropped out.


#3

It’s gunna be a losing battle for you.

To cite just one example: Blockbuster used to stock mainly fullscreen movies. In response to an online petition, they reversed their policy. This was early 2003. Wal-Mart and everyone else you can think of has followed suit. Widescreen has won the battle, essentially.

Have you tried zoom on your standalone? With my players, 2x gets pretty close to what I’d see with a fullscreen DVD. No pan-and-scan to follow the main action, though. Good luck. :wink:


#4

as fritzi93 briefly mentioned, movie studios use pan & scan to convert widescreen to fullscreen. movies are also often shot in both widescreen and fullscreen at the same time with the same camera (the camera has overlaid viewfinders so that the cameraman knows whether the intended image is captured within both fields).

widescreen editions are far more popular than fullscreen editions even among people who have 4:3 tvs.


#5

WTF!!! Widescreen format is not stupid, nor do you have to own a widescreen tv to appreciate seeing the movie as it was meant to be seen.

You wish they would stop making widescreen? Why not let the consumer decide whether they want the widescreen or the fullscreen version?

Obtain a copy of the exact same movie, in both formats. Start them at the same time on two displays next to each other, or at least both in your line of sight. You will then see how much of the movie is chopped away in fullscreen format.


#6

are u crazy, wide screen is the best…
try a movie on a front projector with 5:1 sound in ur home.I have paid my installation for less 1500$ and I am happy to have full unmodified cut version DVD movies.

ur 4/3 TV sucks…4/3 movies suck. believe me. I am not watching movie on TV any more. plasma TV , LCD, retroprojector, all suck!

go get a front projector and u will understand what I mean,…go on www.projectorcentral.com


#7

Well, everyone I know owns a 4:3 tv, most of us simply for the reason that we don’t have money to spend on widescreen TV’s and projectors, and prettymuch everyone I’ve talked to (this includes some Blockbuster employees), hates those bars at the top and bottom of the screen. I’d rather lose a few inches of unimportant footage for the benefit of not being constantly distracted by the black bars at the top of the screen.

I understand SOME people like the widescreen, but I just find it really annoying. Its like I paid for this TV, and now am being forced to use 1/3 of it’s screen! Also, the image is compressed into 1/3rd the space, meaning its even smaller. I have a 22" tv screen, and when the image that COULD be using all of that space winds up using about 7.5" of it, it pisses me off.

I’ve been told by many people that movie companys are soon not even going to bother MAKING fullscreen DVD’s OR VHS copies, so basicly, I and many other consumers no longer have a choice to use the entire screen on our tv’s. Talk about letting the consumer decide.


#8

I understand SOME people like the widescreen, but I just find it really annoying. Its like I paid for this TV, and now am being forced to use 1/3 of it’s screen! Also, the image is compressed into 1/3rd the space, meaning its even smaller. I have a 22" tv screen, and when the image that COULD be using all of that space winds up using about 7.5" of it, it pisses me off.

a few years ago when I was first exposed to “Widesreen” I hated it. I really didnt like those black bars I found them very annoying. and this was on a 52" TV lol…but over time I have come to prefer the widescreen version and appreciate it even on a 19" computer monitor ( which is generally where I watch DVD’s these days.)


#9

It’s good I am stupid too, so two stupids makes it smart?
hehehe. I prefer WS anytime, even if there are black bars top and bottom.

Anyway, converting to FS is more like an art, not just fully automated process, Even if you have such procedures, human intervention and monitoring is more desireable.
Some DVD players can be configured in settings to “fill the screen” and I am using on the PC a freeware player program Windows Media Player Classic, that can be configured to stretch the image, in the expense of making the faces long :slight_smile:


#10

For a list of available Pan and Scan titles, click here:

http://www.dvdreview.com/movies/FilmVault.html


#11

Exactly…I am used to widescreen now, and once you see how much you have been missing, you almost have to prefer widescreen.


#12

My dad and I get into this discussion all the time. He prefers full screen, I prefer wide. It really is a personal preference. The one thing we BOTH agree on, however, is that they SHOULD include both formats on a flip disc. The old warner bros dvd’s do that and it’s truly the best way, IMO. I disagree with forcing either wide or full on the consumer…it should be up to them to decide what they want.


#13

You simply need a player that supports 1.5 zoom (2X is too much), there are many. Also many TV shows (on PBS for one) are also being shown now in 16X9.


#14

He may quack a lot, but he doesn’t say a lot. Get with the program pal. Widescreen is how it’s supposed to be. If you ever see a movie on a large, properly set up tv in widescreen format (even if it’s a P&S screen) you will close your mouth and say “Oh, never mind.” I can’t imagine watching an epic movie such as LOTR in P&S mode. Should be a crime. My .02


#15

“Who’s got a Wide Screen TV?” Me, that’s who. The human eye views the world in widescreen format. HDTV is 16x9, I say let 4:3 die.


#16

Thank you gentlemen. Quack is whack, he wishes they’d just stop making those stupid widescreen DVDs. LMAO

I hate to sound like an a$$, and this does not apply to everyone, but most people that I have met that complain about “those damn black bars” are usually of a lower intelligence, and when you try to explain to them that they are seeing more, they just can’t understand that just because of the fact that their entire tv screen isn’t filled up they are in fact seeing more, they just don’t get it!

Peace and Luv,

DJ Mind


#17

Some widescreen editions are cropped versions of the 4:3 release. An example is The Shawshank Redemption. A friend of mine kindly lent a version that contains the 4:3 version and is contained in a compilation release along with Final Scream, Shivers and Witchcraft. The other is the DVD of the movie presented in 1:1.85 aspect. Interestingly the 1:1.85 version has been produced by cropping the 4:3 image; there is no extra visual content horizontally and substantially less vertically. The merchandising listings I’ve seen all say the 4:3 version has been pan-and-scan produced but that’s evidently not true.

Regards

TigerZai


#18

Garfield is another one


#19

This is one of those deals where ‘you can’t have your cake and eat it too’
either you can keep widescreen and see the whole picture or you can convert to fullscreen and lose a percentage of the sides

the problem with doing it yourself instead of having a commercially converted version is that without many hours of tedious work, you may lose some important parts of the movie

Pan and Scan moves left or right of the widescreen area depending on where the action is taking place
ever seen a fullscreen movie and the camera shifts from one side of the room to ther other, only it looks really weird? like there were two movements going on?


#20

Actually, I believe the film itself is 4:3, and all films are masked to whatever aspect ratio they decide on. But, they know this is going to be done, so there is usually stuff on the top or bottom that is not meant to be seen.

It all boils down in the end, though, to something similar to trying to put a square peg in a round hole; either you need to make the peg smaller, or you need to cut off the corners to make it round.