Why Undersea Internet Cables Are More Vulnerable Than You Think

vbimport

#1

The idea that saboteurs in wetsuits would dive to the bottom of the Mediterranean Sea and cut a fiber optic cable, though not impossible, is highly unlikely, if only because doing so would be a good way to wind up dead.

“These cables are carrying thousands of volts of power,” Mark Simpson, CEO of SEACOM, told Wired. The company owns five undersea fiber optic lines running from South and East Africa to Asia and Europe. Attempting to cut such a line could easily kill you, he said, making sabotage “pretty unusual and pretty dangerous.”

That’s not to say it didn’t happen, and so far, it’s one of the explanations the Egyptian military has offered in the five days since naval forces arrested three men alleged to have attempted to cut an undersea cable off the coast of Alexandria. The head of Egypt Telecom said the incident caused a 60 percent drop in internet speeds.

Link: http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2013/04/how-vulnerable-are-undersea-internet-cables/

:cool::cool:


#2

Fiber optic cables carrying thousands volts of power? Am i missing something here? How powerful are those electrically charged laser beams?

And it’s not the volts. It’s the amps that count. :slight_smile:


#3

But with a constant resistor value (i.e. you), the current (I) increases when the voltage (U) increases (I=U/R)

The electric power on these cables is probably needed for repeater stations that have to refresh the signal.


#4

I am not envisioning Mike Nelson sitting on the Med’s bottom, sawing thru an 8-foot diameter cable with his diving knife. This article is, though. Perhaps Mike would do that. He could take down his new waterproof USB memory-stick, too. Use it on his Sony Vaio laptop with its built-in camera. Start up a Skype session, even. Then, back it all up to his waterproof USB stick.

That’s not exactly what I envision saboteurs doing, though. I’m glad this article’s writer have never heard of “explosive charge”. Or perhaps bringing down 100 lbs of magnesium and some battery powered blasting cap device, and at least Mike’s Skype session would have a kleig’s lightshow available. Who needs an arc welder?


#5

[QUOTE=ClemInKC;2683179]I am not envisioning Mike Nelson sitting on the Med’s bottom, sawing thru an 8-foot diameter cable with his diving knife. This article is, though. Perhaps Mike would do that. He could take down his new waterproof USB memory-stick, too. Use it on his Sony Vaio laptop with its built-in camera. Start up a Skype session, even. Then, back it all up to his waterproof USB stick.

That’s not exactly what I envision saboteurs doing, though. I’m glad this article’s writer have never heard of “explosive charge”. Or perhaps bringing down 100 lbs of magnesium and some battery powered blasting cap device, and at least Mike’s Skype session would have a kleig’s lightshow available. Who needs an arc welder?[/QUOTE]
Not entirely sure that I’d want to go diving to high pressure with blasting caps in my pocket …

That said … Why?