Why still Encrypting movies?

vbimport

#1

Possibly a dumb question here but with all the focus in the past few years
of Illegal downloading of movies, IE torrenting, and also the knowledge that encrypting movies usually get cracked daily going all the way back to the MotherShip Dvd Decrypter and barely any news or Push for a crack down of copying Physical disks, [File Pirating gets all the buzz] why does the MPAA still even bother to encrypt movies ?


#2

No, it isn’t a dumb question…hopefully?..since I have posed similar.
Like…older movies air on cable/ satellite.
Even new movies air on the same.

Then movies are allowed to be rented for very little.
Movies for $5 at wallys, etc.

It doesn’t make good sense…once movies get reduced or aired or rented,
I don’t see the need for them to worry much about encryption or downloads.
Most money is made in theaters and for a few weeks released on disc…


#3

I would think it has more to do with legal responsibility. They encrypt the movies with CSS to show that they are not simply putting the material out into the public without doing something to protect it. Much in the same way that you don’t leave your front door open, as that might be seen as an invitation to come in.

Since decryption of movies is seen as illegal, according to the DMCA in the US, they are making sure that anyone who distributes their content without permission cannot access it without breaking that encryption, and thus are guilty of both illegal distribution and a DMCA violation. Of course you can copy a movie as it plays and make an inferior reproduction, but that won’t be acceptable by most people looking for copies on the net.

Decryption for personal use and fair use of purchased material is another area altogether, though the movie studios will argue against this as well.

What I don’t really understand is the more advanced protection schemes that they continue to come out with. Those are broken quickly and do not delay release of the materials onto the net by enough time to matter. I can’t see that it helps drive sales at all.


#4

Perhaps the movie industry thinks it’s a bad thing that people can buy DVD/Blu-ray media and rip/encode the content to play on their mediaplayers. It’s much better if those same people don’t buy any media at all but simply download the content from pirate sites instead…

Or at least one might think so from the weird logic of it all! :doh:


#5

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2677306]Perhaps the movie industry thinks it’s a bad thing that people can buy DVD/Blu-ray media and rip/encode the content to play on their mediaplayers. It’s much better if those same people don’t buy any media at all but simply download the content from pirate sites instead…

Or at least one might think so from the weird logic of it all! :doh:[/QUOTE]

Yeah I think that’s part of it.

It maximises sales as some non-technologically aware users presumably buy additional copies in other formats.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#6

[QUOTE=Wombler;2677312]It maximises sales as some non-technologically aware users presumably buy additional copies in other formats.[/QUOTE] That wasn’t my (ironic) point at all. My point is that it [B]reduces[/B] sales, when studios punish those who try to get their content legally.


#7

Good points on the possible reasons…
Could very well be also that history has shown the MPAA has been the last to embrace the new technology, fighting to keep the’re outdated mode of output, blaming the new technology for losing money while each year record profits keep rising [although I assume much of the profits come from gouging prices at multi-plexs] my God. do people still go to the movies and plunk down 20 bucks a couple before snacks? Haven’t been to a theater in 10 yrs… Thank u software makers whom I have emebraced…coincidently for ten years.] anyways, It’s no surprise I guess that encryption will go on as long as entertainment still comes in the form of a physical disk…speaking of, do they still encrypt music CD’s?