Why so long to make a backup?

vbimport

#1

Ive heard of ppl creating backups in less then 15min… It takes me 20 min to decrypt and then anther 27 min (12X burn) to shrink and burn. About 50 min for a completed back. Is this right? Is there a faster way? I have the NEC 3520A with 1.U6 firmware and just ordered the Aopen 1648/AAP for a reader drive. Thanks for any input.


#2

Go into the BIOS and verify that your hard drive and optical drives are detected. Set these devices to AUTO detect mode. Save and exit. Go into Device Manager and remove the Primary and Secondary IDE channels. Reboot PC. Go back to Device Manager to verify that all devices in the Primary and Secondary IDE channels are set to use DMA mode, and are running in DMA mode. Apply the settings and reboot PC. Retest burn.

15 min is pushing it, even with a fast DVD reader and 16X burn.


#3

My drives are on auto detect. The only part that seems slow to me is the shrinking/burn which takes 27min at 12X. Unless they are using other software to backup the movies I dunno how they are backing up so quickly. The drive I shrink from is 7200rpm 8mb cache WD 200gig. The drive benchmarks well so I know its not poor hardware performance. Possibly I am missing a setting or it just takes this long to backup.


#4

ALso meant to ask why Autodetect is important? All my drives are showing DMA mode.


#5

The only way to know is to break the backup process into the separate stages.
This is example:

  1. Use DVD Decrypter to rip
  2. Use DVD Shrink to transcode. Note that the more compression or analysis taakes longer. Without compression all the time is actually put into making ISO.
  3. Use DVD Decrypter to burn the ISO.

If you split the process into stages, you can see where time is spent, and compare it to common benchmarks reported by other users.


#6

I have been using DVD shrink to burn the DVD… is this not a good idea? The actual burn time seems to go pretty quickly but it takes a while when doing the compression. I figure 20-25 min spent decrypting, 7min or so burning, about 20 min compressing… does that sound right? I know I will shave some rip time off when my aopen drive comes in but is that compession time about right?


#7

DVD Shrink is not burning program, it just prepares ISO, and use other programs to do the actual burning. You tell DVD Shrink what to do after the ISO has been generated: Nothing, use Nero, use DVD Decrypter. I use None, and manually burn with DVD Decrypter later. Reason? I mount the ISO first in Daemon tools and see If I like it.

As for the compression part. Try once to have a Single Layer DVD-Video, or re-author movie only that needs no compression. This process will not use transcoding, so all the time spent is basically disk access, to read the files from VIDEO_TS folder and to write them in ISO package. This stage can only be improved with faster disk access, or best if you have 2 disks, one as source, one as target. Next if you transcode at say 90% and note the time, you can see how long it took to compress, as you already can estimate the ISO generation time. Transcoding is dependent on CPU muscle, the more the better, and there is never enough :slight_smile:


#8

you can equip your AOpen 1648 with nitrous oxide and you still arent going to see anything close to 15 min for a backup. the folks doing backups in 14-16 min are using CloneDVD2 and ANYDVD usually with an AOpen 1648. although decrypter and shrink are excellent programs they are fairly slow AND you have to use one then use the other. with the combo of CloneDVD2 and AnyDVD they both work together at the same time since AnyDVD works in the background while CloneDVD is working.


#9

Well maybe if I sniff the Nitrous it willl seem like its going faster. :iagree: Quick question…by default DVD Shrink runs in low priority mode. Is it better to uncheck that option?


#10

it depends if you use shrink and do nothing with your computer while it is working then I would say uncheck it. if however, you do use your computer while it is working then I would say leave it as is.