Why DVD2one?

I must say that this program really looks good, but why should I choose to buy this program when there are so many others even free ones.

My friend made a DVD backup of “Roger Rabbit - Directors Cut”

DVD ripped with Smartripper 2.41
Full Disk with some languege left out
after that compressed with DVD2one 1.1.2
After that burned on a DVD-r with 1x speed

The movie looses sound for about 3. sec 54 minuttes in the movie and the Dolby Digital logo disapeers on my DVD-player during these 3 sec. And when playng extra “Behind The Ears” the clip freezes my DVD-player after 14 minuttes. This is when played on “Pioneer DV-343”

I tried comparing the IFO’s just to check what I’ve had read, but the point where the movie freezes or loosing sound is not were there is a “Layer Break information” also that info has been removed in the backup copy Ifo file.

One thing though, when playing it on my DVD-player in my bedroom, nothing goes wrong, and that is the cheapes hunk of junk ever :wink: . But seems to be playing everything

But if I make backup copy’s of my DVD’s, I would like them to be 100% compatible.

So please give me your input on what you think could be the problem, and why I should choose DVD2one.

Thanx for your help
Filson

Could it be that no one have had the same problem as I, or is this question asked somewhere else, that I might have overlooked ??

i think you problem has nothing to do with dvd2 one
Maybe it the way or the software you did use to burn it
try copytoDVD.
I had the same problems with some DVD
after burning them with copytoDVdD no problems at all

grz
martin

Originally posted by filson
My friend made a DVD backup of “Roger Rabbit - Directors Cut”

there is no director’s cut of roger rabbit on dvd :frowning: only a cut version and that worldwide. even all hopes with the vista series dvd where gone on the release. maybe in 100 years we’ll see it in the original theatrical cut :wink:

My friend did burn the DVD with Nero, but I didn’t think that this was the reason, cause on this forum the only problem I’ve read about was loosing sound or freezing at the end of movie, caused by bad DVD media.

But Hey, I’ll give it a shot, I’ll try burning it with CopytoDVD, I see that there is a trial version to download. I’ll get back to tell if it worked.

Oh, and I’m pretty sure that it is a Directors Cut, I have behind the scenes, and deleted scenes on the DVD, but I haven’t seen this version any where else on the net.

The cover is like a brown book, with a gold lock.

I never realy did get a good reason why to chose DVD2One as my DVD backup solution. There are so many out there even free ones. I get my DVD-burner tomorrow, and it whould be nice to know why to choose this one instead of others around.

This question does not meen what program I should choose instead, or which programs you might think is better, I doubt the author would like that ;). No simply just what makes all you people choose this program instead of the many others!.

Filson :smiley:

C’mon lay all your reasons on me!

Here’s some:

100% compatibility with varied movie-encodes (all other proggie forums are filled with ‘exceptions’ that won’t copy correctly).
You set a target-sizing, and it gives it to you (no ‘guesswork’ for movie-only…).
And, the video quality looks great–every time.

That’s why I stay with it…I don’t have to just hope that it went well. D2O seems really solid for all region 1, dvd9>5, movie-only copies.

Buy a Sony DVP-NS705V for in you livingroom and all problems will be gone.
Check it out here.
Then use good media to write on !
If that’s all done and all work ok, start complaining about the software but come with good argumentation cause we have seen it all here.
I work with Nero .35 release and it’s real a ok and playes fine on my Sony.
It’s often a combination of hardware to make it really working good.
Hope this helps and give you my best regards,

Lenco

Reasons to choose dvd2one:

  1. the best quality amongst all those that compress/transcodes
  2. the fastest
  3. the easiest
  4. the only one that “allways works” (if you ripped the original correctly)

Reasons you have playbacktroubles with your friends dvd:

  1. He did no rip it correctly - you should NOT alter anything in the rip process, do not remove any audio in the ripprocess or anything else, simply make a full identical backup, and use dvd2one to strip unwanted audio instead.

  2. The dvd-rom in the pioneer DV-343 does not read DVD-R as well as alot of the cheap players do.

  3. The dvd-r used to burn the movie to was a cheap inferiorquality disc - when you start burning dvd-r now, dont ever ever buy cheap poorquality media trying to save a few cents - it is not worth it. You wont save anything because all you get are alot more coasters - that either wont read at all or wont read the outerrim (last third of the disc) Allways buy goodquality media, like Verbatim certified 2x, Ritek G03, Ritek G04. Its cheaper in the long run because you wont have any coasters.

Originally posted by dvr105
The dvd-r used to burn the movie to was a cheap inferiorquality disc - when you start burning dvd-r now, dont ever ever buy cheap poorquality media trying to save a few cents - it is not worth it. You wont save anything because all you get are alot more coasters - that either wont read at all or wont read the outerrim (last third of the disc) Allways buy goodquality media, like Verbatim certified 2x, Ritek G03, Ritek G04. Its cheaper in the long run because you wont have any coasters.

Not the case to be exactly some cheap brands like Prinoc Unlabeld 4 Speeds will work fine , but keep in mind they are selective , example ;

  • They play fine on any DVD-ROM device.
  • They play fine on any DVD-/+R(W) drive.
  • They play fine on any standalone DVD Player from a well known brand (Sony , Philips , Pioneer ,Toshiba etc)
  • They don’t play fine on standalone DVD Players from fairly unknown brands (Finlux , Lenco etc)

You may ask why right ?

Because of the mere fact that the laser of the well known brands is more accurate , better adjusted/tuned.

Those of the fairly unknown brands are not. They will not recognize these dvds as dvds.

So if you are having trouble with any Princo disc giving you no playback on your standalone dvd player then you now know you can’t always blame the medium , try it in another dvd player before saying it’s the medium’s fault.

For your information , I’ve made a little status report ;

Succesfully Burned DVD-R’s : 137
Succesfully Burned Nashua : 74
Succesfully Burned Princo : 63
Unsuccesfully Burned DVD-R’s : 26
Unsuccesfully burned Nashua : 26
Unsuccesfully burned Princo : 0

So you see , I have had no coasters , no freezing with any Princo DVD-R what so ever. This goes to show that you can’t say the cheapest medium is the baddest.

DVD2One is bought now :wink:

Using DVD+R, and have no problems what so ever, using CopyToDVD to burn movie.

However one question remains :wink: - it is a new one!..

I have read about the different between the compression ratios written by the author of DVD2One, what is your view on this. I meen if I use Constant Ratio, In my belive, that should allways be better. Cause the bittrate has been chosen by professional encoders, and then I’m just lowering it a bit.

And If I use variable ratio, then once again another program decide what quality bitrate when and where, and with the fast speed of DVD2One, one should guess, that when the movie was made, the bitrate that was chosen should be the best.

Hope you have time for one more question :smiley:

Thanks again to all of you
:bigsmile:

If it were that easy, the author would have removed the old, ‘variable’ engine!

If you really, really cannot spare the extra few minutes to try both options and then decide for yourself, the general rule is to use ‘constant’ for long movies where you have set ‘movie only’ mode. For all other instances, use ‘variable’. This is a safe rule rather than a definitive rule and absolutely no substitute for an ad hoc evaluation.

It is interesting to note that in all the hot air expended over these options, I have never seen anyone ask why, if constant is good for whole movies, is it not equally good for full DVDs? The answer is that the constant engine can - rarely - get into difficulties with small VOBs (short bits of film like the opening logos and what-have-you). When this happens the level of blockiness and compression artefacts is much worse than if the variable engine had been chosen. Since this is unpredictable, the only way you would know that you were faced with a problem DVD would be to try it.

Which is what we’ve all been advocating from the start, without, it would seem, resounding success…

-Pete

You could also say that if using constant bitrate simply lowers the bitrate chosen by the original equally in the entire movie - then sometimes when the bitrate is allready low, for instance in the menus and some very slow parts of the movie, the bitrate with constant ratio could get TO low resulting in artefacts.

Using variable bitrate the bitrate would not be equaly lowered everywhere thus compensating in the areas where the bitrate are allready low, and not lowering bitrate much in these areas - giving a more allround quality of the result.

Like Peter has said many times - the “problem” is that you never know beforehand how the bitratelayout is in the original footage - and therefore dont know if a constant or a variable compression would give the best results. If the bitrate is reasonable high and dont vary to much in the original - then constant compression would propably be best, but if the bitrate of the original is low, varys alot, and sometimes are very low, then perhaps the variable compression would be best. Either way - theres no telling without trying both compression methods and see which turns out the best.

If one does not have time to do this, then I simply suggest making a test of both with a few different dvd’s and see which in general seems to work best for you, and then simply stick to that.

In general the difference is small and you will never really get poor quality neither way - so just stick to whatever you feel suits you best :slight_smile:

Originally posted by dvr105

Like Peter has said many times - the “problem” is that you never know beforehand how the bitratelayout is in the original footage - and therefore dont know if a constant or a variable compression would give the best results.

Please forgive me if my ignorance causes me to ask a stupid question, but would it be possible for DVD2One to include a feature that would quickly analyze the disk for overall bitrate depth and then make a suggesion for choosing constant or variable?

That’s what I’ve suggested–and it would be great for movie-only’s if some genius with ‘time on his hands’ wants yet one more waste of it…
There are differences 'tween Con and Var–but results are hard to predict in advance. And yes, for the most part, differences are minor. I am going to default to Variable. D2O’s quality-decisions are what attacted me to chose it over others in the first place–I’ll stick with the method I started with.
I just followed SirScrub’s guide to flippers for the 4+ hour Dance’s With Wolves. Used variable at 4458 for A and 3458 for B for initial processing, then compared Con and Var for final processing of the 7+ Gb/9 vob output. Repeated for Con on first processing and both on output.
After extensive compares, all I can say ‘definitively’ is that I’m really sick of Kevin Costner now…
[thank god I didn’t choose WaterWorld!]

Mr Gattig:

You misunderstand the problem. The constant mode engine becomes ‘confused’ in certain circumstances, but no one knows what those circumstances are. If it were possible to scan the video stream and recognise a particular set of data likely to give rise to the problem, the problem wouldn’t be there. Would it?

All that seems true from the empirical evidence is that lengthy footage (or movies) are not affected, only short items. Hence the recommendation to use the constant mode for long movies - and then ‘movie only’ mode.

It is this (current) inability to predict the likelihood of quality deterioration that is the problem. Presenting you with a trace of the bitrates for each of the DVD’s VOBs would not help because you wouldn’t know what to look for. No one does.

I’m perfectly sure that this uncertainty will be resolved eventually, but for now every new DVD is a bit like meeting a strange dog. Will it bite if you stroke it? You won’t know until you try.
So, ask yourself, do I feel lucky? Well, do ya, punk? :wink:

-Pete

Ok Peter, I think I understand now that even in movie only mode, there are more variables involved than just the bit depth that dvr105 had mentioned to be able to do a successful pre-scan.

As for feeling lucky, 50/50 odds are not bad considering the wager for “slightly better picture quality.” Plus one could better those odds by applying your rule of thumb. So yeah, I feel lucky.javascript:smilie(’:cool:’)