Why DVD+R(W) is superior to DVD-R(W)

Yea, I agree, LPP Address would be harder to read while recording. But I’m wondering if reading LPP address while recording is meaningful. I mean, if you have noticed you are on the wrong track by reading LPP address, you’ve already burnt the wrong track. It’s too late. Maybe monitoring the wobble would be reasonable? Actually, I think even -R/-RW drives have the loss-less linking feature, which has to be a pretty small link error such as 8 bits or less. Anyway, I agree it depends on the chipsets, and its OPU as well :g

Oh, great, +RW to use DRT-DM is possible indeed! But isn’t Mt Rainier for -RW drives possible, at least, -RW discs in dual format drives? What forbid Mt Rainier on -RW discs? :o

Because some regions of the lead-in which are needed for Mt Rainier are already used by -R(W) format for something else.

Someone said “RW isn’t a stable medium”. Why is that? Please, someone explain. Thank you.

You will be lucky if anyone bothers to explain that one. The poisonous words (rightfully) directed toward the RW format/discs is all over the Internet. Do a search via Google or at CDFreaks itself if you want to read any of it. It is a lot simpler to just accept that RW is not a good format. Besides, who needs RW? It is overpriced and a fringe-use format mainly found in specialised applications, not general usage.

I have 3 stand-alone DVD players. I burned one -R and one+R. The +R can be read by all 3 players, The -R can be read by only one player. Which one is better ? I think we have the right answer.

I’m a +R with bitsetting user and I have found that for me it is the most compatible. However, in a thread where we were discussing DVD+R vs. DVD-R someone posted the following: “Also DVD+R uses high frequency wobbles for addressing (same as CD-R) while DVD-R uses LPPs. The demerit of using wobble for addressing is that the Pickup of your player can easily read the wobble next to the one it should read. A mag in japan has made some test about this and some DVD+R with a 100 min long movie got played back in only 95minutes because the Player skipped tracks because it got lost in the wobbles.” Most of your article goes over my head, but to someone who doesn’t know much about this stuff, the above quote (at face value) makes sense. My question is… is there any truth to that?(the quote) Can the high frequency wobbles of DVD+R cause problems when playing back video?

Regarding RW stability and usage: Speeds are now much higher, prices are lower, and stability has apparently improved, especially with the new A-SERL technology that minimizes re-write degradation. For those who don’t have a DVD-RAM drive and need to make regular backups of frequently changed data, as well as burn DVD +/-R, RW can be useful.

No, that’s completely wrong. It is much easier to miss a pre-pit than to miss a wobble period : as I explained, pre-pits are merely an amplitude modulation trick, while wobble phase inversions are very robust. Furthermore, if you misdetect only one pre-pit you can see a sync instead of a data bit, which makes -R format much more prone to sync errors.

That was a great read! I was lied to by someone at one of the retail chains, then. I was searching for a DVD recorder, and finally decided on the Pioneer DVR-225S. I was told, by someone at one of the chains, that DVD- is becomming MORE popular and more common in units. In all the units i saw a year ago, when i bought my unit, DVD+ format was more prevalent. I always found it odd that when I use DVD+ media in my computer’s burner, it always has to format the disc. When using DVD-, i never get a message in the software that the disc needs formatting. I, along with everyone else, thanks you for clearing this confusion up. Now, the makers of DVD+ need to exploit such information so they can sell more units. LOL

Fact is, dvd-r is more compatible than non dvdrom booktype dvd+r but dvd+R set to booktype dvdrom is more compatible than dvd-r. Anyway, compatibility issues are only apparant on old dvd players and usually that was using dvd+r discs not bitset, I’ve never had a dvd-r that hasn’t worked on an old player. All new dvd players have been tweaked to play all formats, even dvd+r not bitset to dvdrom.

hi … this was a good read. I too was under the impression that DVD-r(w) was better than +r(w). Reading your expalnation was interesting. About 3mnths ago i got our 1st stand alone DVD recorder that handles all formats. Ive tried just one +r disk & was ok untill i went to finalise it. I could NOT finalise untill i removed the titles id set prior to this. !! very strange. Ive had a failure rate of about one in very six disks using DVD-r. So now i shall try using +r disks & see wether this improves. Thanks again for some very helpfull info. russ;)

I’ve heard the DVD+R has a 16 tracks limit, while all other formats including DVD+RW is 99 tracks. Is this true? Chen

I’m no expert at formats, but it sounds like DVD-R has only two noticable advantages over DVD+R. 1) compatibility with older players 2) better “copyright protection” Since all the questions I know of (and a lot more) about the advantages of DVD+R have been asked and answered to my satisfaction, I only have questions regarding the advantages of DVD-R. 1) is that only from before DVD+R was invented? If so, when was that? 2) What exactly is this copyright protection? the copyright of the DVD-R makers? of yourself? of whatever company made what you’re burning to the disc? Finally, if I missed something else good about DVD-Rs please mention it. P.S. if you’re wondering, this article and its reactions are the only info I currently have on the debate. And at home I’ve only used DVD+R so far (they were on sale when I needed blank DVDs :stuck_out_tongue: ).

I’m no expert at formats, but it sounds like DVD-R has only two noticable advantages over DVD+R. 1) compatibility with older players 2) better “copyright protection” Since all the questions I know of (and a lot more) about the advantages of DVD+R have been asked and answered to my satisfaction, I only have questions regarding the advantages of DVD-R. 1) is that only from before DVD+R was invented? If so, when was that? 2) What exactly is this copyright protection? the copyright of the DVD-R makers? of yourself? of whatever company made what you’re burning to the disc? Finally, if I missed something else good about DVD-Rs please mention it. P.S. if you’re wondering, this article and its reactions are the only info I currently have on the debate. And at home I’ve only used DVD+R so far (they were on sale when I needed blank DVDs :stuck_out_tongue: ).

Thanks for the info! From now on I’ll buy + media for backups and - media for general distribution video DVDs.

The Defect Management System is a great disadvantage of DVD+RW. If you will try to read a DVD+RW in a worn-out drive it will try to “improve” the disc and your data will be lost.

That’s interesting. Is that what’s just started to happend with my Philips DVDR75? I always use DVD+RW’s and they have just staretd to become corrupted when trying to play, not record. I’m just in the process of buying a Sony replacement with 80GB hard disc & Freeview (UK).

All data in DVD-R are protected by an error correction code, see standard ECMA-359, Section 18, ECC Block configuration: “An ECC Block is formed by arranging 16 consecutive Scrambled Frames in an array of 192 rows of 172 bytes each, see Figure 27. To each of the 172 columns, 16 bytes of Parity of Outer Code are added, then, to each of the resulting 208 rows, 10 byte of Parity of Inner Code are added. Thus a complete ECC Block comprises 208 rows of 182 bytes each.” (http://www.ecma-international.org/publications/files/ECMA-ST/ECMA-359.pdf)

Very interesting. I’m planing to buy an external DVD burner (Plextor PX-755uf). It supports both - and + r medias. I’m also interested in DL burning for backups. I noticed that -R DL media is harder to find than the -R DL’s. Does anyone have experience DL Burning and if so, does DL media follow “the same” restrictions/benefits mentioned in this Review/Forum/Blog? Feel Free to email me. Thanks.