Why do i need an aspi layer?

vbimport

#1

question in the subject. is it necessary that i have one?

thanks


#2

Some guy named Bart has a good page about it.

ASPI stands for Advanced SCSI Programming Interface. Originally developed by Adaptec. It is a software layer that enables programs to communicate with SCSI (and ATAPI) devices.

And another ASPI faq states this :

"Does the OS need the ASPI layer?

Some persons, in particular in the newsgroups about CD-ROM burning, often say that Windows 2000 or XP (or still other ones) “needs” or “doesn’t need” the ASPI layer. This is an incorrect way of stating things. The OS doesn’t “need” the ASPI layer. It can be delivered with an ASPI layer (as in the case of Windows 95) or not (as with Windows NT). It doesn’t call any functions in the DLLs building the ASPI layer.
On the other hand, applications (programs) call the ASPI layer to access lower-level functions and ultimately the hardware. That means that only applications (programs) can be the cause of incompatibilities bound to the Aspi layer.
"


#3

thanks for the speedy response but do i really need it? im asking cos cdr identifier says i need one for the program to work. is it worth it?


#4

Originally posted by hburrows83
thanks for the speedy response but do i really need it? im asking cos cdr identifier says i need one for the program to work. is it worth it?

depends on how the program handles the things … in order to access the hardware you would have to go through several layers or protocols. In general it’s a matter of handshake through layers , drivers, firmware and normal accessing.

perhaps something like this

  1. application makes request via os
  2. operating system grants that request and accesses hardware device via a windows driver

or

  1. application makes request via aspi layer
  2. apsi layer responds , directly accessing the hardware divice and giving some info to the os (“this thing is now busy” or something)

Some Operating Systems don’t like it that programs control hardware devices directly and need a layer in between (A windows driver , you name it) , some Operating Systems couldn’t care less if you use direct access of the protocol of the hardware device (Write a bit directly to com1 for instance)

There are layers/drivers “in between” to bypass the Operating controls , DirectX is one of them (granting users and applications to talk via another set of protocols than the os drivers). OpenGL is also one of them. Maybe APSI is as well ?

If the program states it needs ASPI in order to operate correctly , why arguing about it ? :slight_smile: In the case of cdr identifier i think it’s better, because it tried to bypass the OS’s own drivers (which may give different results because they are controlled by the OS).


#5

thanks :smiley: :cool: :smiley: :wink: :slight_smile: :cool: :wink: :smiley: :stuck_out_tongue: :slight_smile: