Why aren't we burning movies to Flashdrives already?

vbimport

#1

With 8GB and 16GB USB flashdrives out there why haven’t they replaced DVDs as the choice for movie media? Or maybe they are starting to and I need to know how?? They sure would take up less space and the players would be a lot smaller. :confused:


#2

Possibly cost? An 8GB flash drive runs around $20 while a blank disc is 50 cents or less…


#3

There are lots of different players that can accept movies on flash drives, in a number of different formats. Look at the Western Digital TV Live player as an example of such a device.

Some stand alone dvd players that playback divx/xvid avi files will accept those files on usb sticks. You’ll need to look at the particular requirements of the player though.


#4

:clap: Yes cost is an issue now but let’s remember when blank DVDs first came out they were more expensive too. Kinda like the Tesla electric car is right now but as soon as people start really buying them the price will drop because of increased demand.


#5

Didn’t know about any players out there. Well is there a way to backup movies to a flashdrive using programs like DVDFab?? Are divx/xvid avi files the only playable formats for flashdrives?


#6

It varies according to the player. The media center devices can play more types of files. Look at online sites for reviews of these players like the WD HD TV, Popcorn Hour, Iomega Screen Play, etc.

There are even some dedicated forums for these players.


#7

Ok but any ideas on getting the movies on it? Would you just burn it to a file and then move it over? And what would have to be done to make it automatically play when inserted like a DVD?


#8

Give it more time. The future of non-ondemand video storage is indeed solid state, not more disc-based stuff (Blu-ray will fail long-term, it’s already started).

The solid-state costs are falling radically, if you pay attention to camera memory.

Ask again in 2015.

When that happens, DVD players will be relics of the past too – the display (formerly known as a “TV”) will have built-in ports to accept and play movies.

I’m not joking, I’m not making this stuff up. This is the back-end buzz currently taking place in the broadcast industry.


#9

[QUOTE=Philrz28;2476513]Yes cost is an issue now but let’s remember when blank DVDs first came out they were more expensive too.[/QUOTE]

There are limits to what economy of scale can do. Flash memory is made of semiconductor chips, made in factories that are astonishingly expensive to build, run, and upgrade using extremely pure (and expensive) silicon. Production becomes cheaper when a manufacturer switches to a new process with a smaller feature size (although using larger wafers also helps), however, researching the technology for this costs a fortune and depends on progress made by scientist in relevant areas of physics, and for every new generation the cost of building or upgrading a fab (semiconductor fabrication plant) increases dramatically.

Although increased sales of electronics help make it possible for the manufacturers to afford this, flash chips is just one of many types of semiconductor.


#10

Oh I agree 100%. But I think the delay is on purpose in order to try to milk what can be had out of Blu-ray which I refuse to switch to.


#11

[QUOTE=lordsmurf;2476531]…I’m not joking, I’m not making this stuff up. This is the back-end buzz currently taking place in the broadcast industry.[/QUOTE]

Yup, it sure sounds like someone’s talking out of their ass…:rolleyes:


#12

True … but not true…

You are correct in that this is a purely economic issue!

Optical disc has been an unusual fiasco business-wise, especially DVD media. The margin for profit is very small — [I]I refer ONLY to the $20-30 per 100-pack type pricing most of us wait for![/I] — and in some ways this is a victim of the loss-leader retail economics from the past 10-15 years.

A good VHS tape was about $2-3 blank, and a cheapie/crappy tape was about $1 — and nobdy ever complained about this! When DVD was $1 each, there were still no real complaints! When discs hit the 25 cent mark, people now raise hell if it even thinks about creeping towards that 50 cent mark. … AND they still expect perfect quality.

It’s ignorant economics.

The next-gen format – whatever it is – isn’t going to cost 25 cents anymore. Maybe not even 50 cents. It will likely be that $1+ price mark again. Consumers are just going to have to suck it up. A better product will likely require more expensive tech.


#13

[QUOTE=Aramchek;2476532]There are limits to what economy of scale can do. Flash memory is made of semiconductor chips, made in factories that are astonishingly expensive to build, run, and upgrade using extremely pure (and expensive) silicon. Production becomes cheaper when a manufacturer switches to a new process with a smaller feature size (although using larger wafers also helps), however, researching the technology for this costs a fortune and depends on progress made by scientist in relevant areas of physics, and for every new generation the cost of building or upgrading a fab (semiconductor fabrication plant) increases dramatically.

Although increased sales of electronics help make it possible for the manufacturers to afford this, flash chips is just one of many types of semiconductor.[/QUOTE]

This may be true but again my feeling is that the technology already exists. And that it is being withheld because companies are trying to milk the present media (DVD).


#14

[QUOTE=pipemanid;2476535]Yup, it sure sounds like someone’s talking out of their ass…:rolleyes:[/QUOTE]
Your refusal to accept the reality of change is not my problem.

Read the past two years worth of [I]Broadcasting Engineering[/I], among others. The trend to solid-state in multiple uses – from cameras to production to distribution, is discussed regularly. Not distribution as much (broadcasters do not distribute, they broadcast!), but it’s often part of the big-picture discussions.


#15

[QUOTE=lordsmurf;2476538]Your refusal to accept the reality of change is not my problem.[/QUOTE]

Where did I refuse to accept ‘the reality of change’?
I’ve been around the world and back and have heard all of the projections that never panned out…Just because someone feels the need to try and predict where things will be in the future doesn’t mean I have to buy into their delusions…
How’s your flying car and personal robot working out?


#16

[QUOTE=Philrz28;2476537]This may be true but again my feeling is that the technology already exists. And that it is being withheld because companies are trying to milk the present media (DVD).[/QUOTE]

I don’t know. Maybe.

I guess it depends on who “companies” is.

I think they (the studios, and the bigger corp owners like Sony) are still hoping to foist Blu-ray on us, since so much was spent there.

The whole reason Toshiba left HD-DVD without more fight was because they wanted to spend their monies on the SS tech. That’s how they’ve spent their time these past couple of years, after abandoning HD-DVD so early into the “war” that never had more than 2-3 small battles.

They could launch SS now, but DVD still has a decade left in it. The pre-recorded media is where the $$$ is anyway, not the blank opticals. SS is already being used in production and recording – video distribution is the only real untapped market still left.

Pre-recorded leads the charge, recordable follows later.


#17

[QUOTE=lordsmurf;2476536]True … but not true…

You are correct in that this is a purely economic issue!

Optical disc has been an unusual fiasco business-wise, especially DVD media. The margin for profit is very small — [I]I refer ONLY to the $20-30 per 100-pack type pricing most of us wait for![/I] — and in some ways this is a victim of the loss-leader retail economics from the past 10-15 years.

A good VHS tape was about $2-3 blank, and a cheapie/crappy tape was about $1 — and nobdy ever complained about this! When DVD was $1 each, there were still no real complaints! When discs hit the 25 cent mark, people now raise hell if it even thinks about creeping towards that 50 cent mark. … AND they still expect perfect quality.

It’s ignorant economics.

The next-gen format – whatever it is – isn’t going to cost 25 cents anymore. Maybe not even 50 cents. It will likely be that $1+ price mark again. Consumers are just going to have to suck it up. A better product will likely require more expensive tech.[/QUOTE]

Well naturally anything new will cost more at first. It’s their way of recouping costs up front. But after all the folks that have to have it first spend their money, prices will drop as always. And don’t get me wrong, I’m fine with DVDs and am not in any rush for a another Media change that nullifies all my discs. :iagree:


#18

[QUOTE=pipemanid;2476540]Where did I refuse to accept ‘the reality of change’?I’ve been around the world and back and have heard all of the projections that never panned out…Just because someone feels the need to try and predict where things will be in the future doesn’t mean I have to buy into their delusions…How’s your flying car and personal robot working out?[/QUOTE]
You probably doubted the RED camera too, didn’t you? :flower:


#19

[QUOTE=lordsmurf;2476541]…The whole reason Toshiba left HD-DVD without more fight was because they wanted to spend their monies on the SS tech. That’s how they’ve spent their time these past couple of years, after abandoning HD-DVD so early into the “war” that never had more than 2-3 small battles.[/QUOTE]
The main reason Toshiba dropped HD DVD was because it was hacked and the major studios dropped their backing…Even Microsoft saw the writing on the wall with that one…


#20

I’ll leave DVD by choice when I can put 50-60fps next-gen HD format onto a single eSATA stick and it holds 3 hours of top-quality content. That is probably 7+ years away right now, minimum.

“By choice” is the issue, though.