Why 4K is wrong

vbimport

#1

Camera manufacturers stoke our egos with the thought that if we shoot 4K, we’ll be able to improve the overall quality of our production, expand our business, be more creative, use the footage forever and become a Hollywood filmmaker. Since 1998, the advertising buzz surrounding technologies such as 24p standard definition, 1080i HD, 1080p HD, 720p HD, 720p Variable Frame Rate, 1” imagers and the like have had compelling reasons that drove their success. However, some touted technologies such as the biggest marketing debacle in the past 15 years — 3-D TV — have not lived up to expectations, and 4K technology is another flash in the pan despite what equipment manufacturers tell us. The most oft-repeated promises for improvement are in the areas of quality, post, delivery and future proofing, but here is why that will not hold up.

Link: http://broadcastengineering.com/hdtv/why-4k-wrong?NL=BE-12&Issue=BE-12_20130901_BE-12_993&YM_RID=gary@widescreenreview.com&YM_MID=1419593&sfvc4enews=42

:cool::cool:


#2

Personally, I can’t wait to see how many more characters can be included in each film-cell at 4k that were left off the 2.4k drawing boards! “Find the 10 elves!” Oh boy.


#3

The title is wrong. Better title it “A Cinematographer Named John Bourbonais in Colorado Springs Complains Why A Sony 110-inch 4K TV Cannot Justify Its High Cost.”

He owns a “High Definition Video Production” company. The very name of his business includes the specific standard of 1080p.


#4

4K thus far appears to be headed the same way as 3D. Put aside for now the question of whether there will be a viable option for delivery of 4K content to consumers, which is by no means a certainty.

Its the content providers and sellers (movie studios) who decide how content gets delivered, not the makers of TVs. The majority of studios are unwilling to release titles in multiple formats, plain and simple. So the only real selling point for 4K TVs is the faint promise that existing SD and HD content will look better on the 4K display.
This is actually a repeat of the situation existing when 1080 displays were introduced, with the exception that content providers were a lot more invested in providing HD content once adoption took hold.

I don’t see 4K being anything more than the same type nitch that 3D is now. Eventually we will see 4K displays available at similar prices as 1080p displays are now, but until widespread adoption of 4K TVs is seen, there will be very little content available.


#5

4K will basically be the Movie Industry’s Trojan Horse to deploy the next generation of DRM.

e.g. HDCP 2.2.


#6

4K technology sounds well and good. However, it won’t save the movie industry if they keep releasing crap movies. “Batman and Robin” in 4K would still be a lousy movie.


#7

All this hoopla is about hooking people to buy more expensive hardware. They thought 3D was going to accomplish this and it didn’t. So now they are rolling out the 4k propaganda hoping that it gets the lemmings to break out their credit cards. The reason Hollywood will not support this is because it won’t put any more money in their pockets anytime soon. Same goes for cable, satellite, FIOS companies. Hardware suppliers are the only ones pushing 4k because they can make the hardware today and sell it to the masses at inflated prices.


#8

4K is about the number of pixels. 3D is entirely something else unrelated to anything.

[QUOTE=CDan;2701861]Eventually we will see 4K displays available at similar prices as 1080p displays are now, but until widespread adoption of 4K TVs is seen, there will be very little content available.[/QUOTE]

So you agree 4K will succeed 1080p HDTV and Blu-ray? Then, you agree 4K TVs will become widespread.

So why are you insisting there will be very little contents for 4K?

Really? Are you sure contents providers were “a lot more invested” in providing HD contents?

The fact is that it took very, very long for analog TV to spread and the contents compatible with those first-generation TV sets to become available at low cost. The time to market for the first color TVs and color contents was very much shorter. It took even less time for first digital TV and digital programming to be standardized in Japan, the US, and Europe. For SD to evolve to HD, it took some more years and most of the delay had to do with regional patent wars since that was all about money and media influence between Japan, the US, and Europe, and also between left and right, between North and South, between every competing groups.

What’s happening is complex enough. Acceleration in technological research and development, media fusion, competition and convergence between home electronics and computers, and between traditional industrial centers of production and consumption of media and all kinds of new media that cannot fit into traditional categories, shift of power, shift of regional basis of production, accumulation of copyrighted and pirated cultural contents, these all contribute.

Many of the current 4K TV sets and 4K computer panels (for desktops and portables) are already at least as cheap as the first TV sets and the first HDTV sets and the first flat panel TV sets during the early introductory periods. Nobody is forcing you to buy a US$4,000 4K TV before the end of 2013. What is apparent is the rate of adoption and the speed of conception to R&D and to mass production and mass marketing regarding 4K have been overwhelmingly successful. It took more months than original plans to commercialize the first-generaiton OLED 4K TVs, but it took relatively a very short period of time for such things to appear considering only Samsung was really heavily investing into OLED. The very term 4K was not on the web frequently several years ago. HDTV or something like that first appeared years before I was born. It took practically two generations for most developed European nations to finalize their own HDTV specification.

Blame your own politics rather than the electronics industry. This time, it won’t be that easy for the entertainment industry and reactionary governments to delay as long as possible. 4K is just the beginning.


#9

[QUOTE=UTR;2701872]…

Hardware suppliers are the only ones pushing 4k because they can make the hardware today and sell it to the masses at inflated prices.[/QUOTE]

You can always find hardware suppliers that do not sell at inflated prices. You always buy at the lowest possible prices even when many of those hardware providers have to sell at whatever price in order to stay. There is always an option to start manufacturing your own hardware in case you believe the world’s hardware supplier’s market is monopolized by some mysterious Asian power.


#10

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2701876]You can always find hardware suppliers that do not sell at inflated prices. You always buy at the lowest possible prices even when many of those hardware providers have to sell at whatever price in order to stay. There is always an option to start manufacturing your own hardware in case you believe the world’s hardware supplier’s market is monopolized by some mysterious Asian power.[/QUOTE]

Just about any leading edge technology is sold at premium prices. How long will it take 4k to reach reasonable prices through mass adoption when there will be little to no 4k video available for a very long time?

As for your second point, I don’t quite see how you jumped to this conclusion from my post. Why would I manufacture hardware I have no interest in owning? Where did I say Asian powers had hardware monopolies? My point is that 4k is being pushed in an effort by manufacturers to gin up sales of expensive hardware.

As mentioned in another post here, one needs to look at how long standard definition hung around before HD came to pass to know that 4k has a long way to go before it becomes commonplace. IMO, the push for 4k is very premature.