Who *really* made this CD-R blank?

vbimport

#1

Does anyone know if this information (almost 3 years old) was, or is still correct?


#2

There are all sorts of software you can use to identify the original manufacture of the media, CDR or DVDR. KProbe does a good job on CDRs now. DVDInfo does a good job on DVDRs. There are many others, so search around.

Turns out the FujiFilm 2.4x DVD+R I bought from BestBuy are made by Ricoh. Sweet.


#3

What exactly is your point ? Both the site and its content have been known for ages.
Generally speaking, the info is still the same and all that has been discussed regularly here.


#4

Yes, I am aware of the software that identifies the manufacturer and I guess my point was: what good is it if only recognizes the manufacturer of the blank and not who the real disc manufacturer was or what dye was really used.


#5

You don’t get it do you? The CDR/DVDR identifiers show the real manuafacturer of the media and the dye used.

I can’t imagine what your real life is like if you’re so paranoid about minor things like “who really made my CDR and what dye they really used.”


#6

what good is it if only recognizes the manufacturer of the blank and not who the real disc manufacturer was or what dye was really used.

There are documented examples of an ATIP showing one maker where the disc was made elsewhere, but this is the exception. The “low-rent” makers might buy stampers anywhere and use them to make CDR’s. When you’re looking at “budget” media, anything is possible.
No one has every reported any discrepancy with major makers like TY, RiTEC, etc. Just one more reason to stick with them.
The ATIP is just one of the tools you can use to ensure a quality burn, the bottom line is that if the media works, who cares who made it?


#7

Thank you rdgrimes,
that is the information I wanted to hear.


#8

Damn, Stoner. All I did was ask a question. If your real life is anything like your post you must be one lonely son of a gun.


#9

Originally posted by jmbrown

what good is it if only recognizes the manufacturer of the blank and not who the real disc manufacturer was or what dye was really used.

@jmbrown

As for the dyes, it’s simply impossible technologically to countrfeit a dye.
In short, there is no point in competiting the WW known giant CDR manufacturers.
There is no sense in building a serious and long-term business based on counterfeiting either.
So, you shouldn’t have taken the info from cdrfaq.org for granted.

Despite all that, your question had its common sense and wasn’t at all stupid. That’s what I’m 100% sure about.
And to show you why it is so, just read my post [COLOR=darkblue]here, that hopefully will encourage you a little.
So, it’s not as simple as if it were just in black and white.

Also read Disc Identification Code in my sig.[/COLOR]