Who Owns the Moon?

vbimport

#1

early 40 years after the U.S. flag was planted on the moon, a global rush to the final frontier has some pondering property rights out there.

India, Japan and China are now circling the moon with their respective spacecraft – to be joined next year by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Then there’s the Google Lunar X Prize, a $30 million competition for the first privately funded team to send a robot to the moon, travel some 1,640 feet (500 meters) and transmit video, images and data back to Earth.

I own the Moon the United States did not pay the mortgage they had with mo on it so I foreclosed. If India Japan or China want to vacation there they need to rent space from me. I am still trying to get the USA to remove the junk they left there, along with the footprints.


#2

It’s quite simple, everyone or no one. Take your pick.


#3

/me has a certificate that states that I own quote a large property on the moon…


#4

“The Man”.


#5

I think the old saying “Possession is 9th of the law” applies here. How is the ownership of Antarctica determined? Maybe that is a good model.


#6

This reminds me of a quote from an old roleplaying game:

[I]“This is mine, for I shall take it!”[/I]

Ownership is an illusion that only gains real power when enough people believe in the illusion.

The Moon will be “owned” by whoever can enforce their “ownership” over it and make other people/nations believe in that ownership.

.
.
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Unless of course the Martians have already staked their claim to it.



#7

Antarctica is not actually a country. It consists of several different territories controlled by countries such as America, Russia, and the UK. Antarctica is sort of like a very large animal conservation park and research center. The Antarctic treaty is an agreement between 12 countries: Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Chile, France, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, the Soviet Union, the UK, and the U.S. in order to split up the land for each countries own scientific use. I hope this helped!


#8

Thanks for the info, Alan. Hopefully, any Moon base will be an international effort so this won’t be an issue. I think the expense and required technical expertise might require the effort to be spread around.


#9

Take me to your leader :bigsmile:



#10

[B][COLOR=red]Tax[/COLOR] is Right as the Moon is made of CHEESE the DUTCH own it :bigsmile:[/B]


#11

[QUOTE=diane7;2175716][B][COLOR=red]Tax[/COLOR] is Right as the Moon is made of CHEESE the DUTCH own it :bigsmile:[/B][/QUOTE]

Not if the cheese is this one :p:p:p :bigsmile:


#12

You have Gouda be kidding! :stuck_out_tongue:


#13

ok the [B]Italians[/B] win a little Portion 4 the Parmizon …BUT NOT for the [B]PERONI Nastro Azzurro Birra Superiore[/B] …I Still haz the Bottle :bigsmile:

Stick to WINE and Grappa :iagree::stuck_out_tongue:
:flower:


#14

[QUOTE=UTR;2175661]Thanks for the info, Alan. Hopefully, any Moon base will be an international effort so this won’t be an issue. I think the expense and required technical expertise might require the effort to be spread around.[/QUOTE] It’d be nice if it were an international effort, but we have a problem here…

NASA admits that one nation will likely beat it back to the moon: China. China wants to participate in the International Space Station project, but the U.S. and partner countries refuse to give China access.

China wants to build and launch its own space station, which will coincide with them trying to be the next country to reach the moon again.

Politics, folks, could really hinder what should be great scientific research. :frowning:


#15

China will soon be hit with the realities of the new economic disater. With a middle class of 300 milliion that leaves 1.6 billion living in near poverty. Tienanmen Square was squash by the general population and as the economy dis-enfranchises the huge majority there there will be massive backlash’s to the people who feel left out. The Aries project is well on it’s way and if we (America) are stupid enough to back out of it then we too will pay a great price. I am of the opinion that America could go it alone. I don’t advocate abandoning out part of the space station but we should have a separate and distinct program that does not force us to rely on anybody but Americans.


#16

Really? If we “go it alone,” then we won’t be back on the ISS until 2015 or 2016! Since the shuttle’s retirement in 2010, that’s five or six years of not being in space or on the ISS.

I’m okay working with another nations, despite the heavy influence of politics.


#17

Economics will drive the race back to the Moon. There is a commodity on the Moon called Lunar Helium-3 (He3) that might be the reason for us to go there in a big way. It allows for a much easier path to develop fusion reactors. While this variant of helium is extremely rare on Earth it is relatively abundant on the Moon since the solar wind reaches its surface and this is its source. The Earth’s magnetic fields keeps us from getting much solar wind and since the Moon has no magnetic field it has collected more. The amount of energy to be had from the Moon’s estimated resources of He3 is ten times the entire amount of mining ALL the fossil fuels on Earth. One space shuttle load of the stuff (25 tons) would equal all the energy needs of the USA for a full year. There is estimated to be one million tons of He3 on the lunar surface. If anyone cares to read more here’s a link: http://www.asi.org/adb/02/09/he3-intro.html

Letting my mind run a muck, I wonder if we will eventually send up He3 collectors to orbit around the Sun and collect this gas. There the solar wind is more dense and it might be more economical than mining vast quantities of moon dust. I think it would be an elegant solution to our energy needs if it becomes feasible.


#18

FFS … if it’s not bad enough that we’ve strip-mined the planet for everything it’s worth, now we’re doing the same to rest of the universe.

The Human Race is a bunch of locusts with a superiority complex :stuck_out_tongue:


#19

In another 4-5 billion years, when the Sun is in its death throws, nothing will be left of the inner planets anyway so why care if we tear it up a little beforehand? I won’t even get into the theory of the Big Rip. It will take care of whatever is left. Besides, unless we cause the Moon to crash into the Earth, who cares if we mine the hell out of the Moon? It’s not like there is any life there to complain about it. Leave it to the extreme environmentalists though to complain about environmental impacts where there is no ecosystem. Not that I am saying you are one of those people. :wink:


#20

[QUOTE=Randomus;2176021]Really? If we “go it alone,” then we won’t be back on the ISS until 2015 or 2016! Since the shuttle’s retirement in 2010, that’s five or six years of not being in space or on the ISS.

I’m okay working with another nations, despite the heavy influence of politics.[/QUOTE]

You may have misread my post. I stated I was not in favor of abandoning the Space Station but that we should have a distinct separate program that does not require us to rely on anyone. Parallel systems. The greatest contributor to the I.S.S. is America, without our shuttle there would be no I.S.S…

I also believe that a couple of the shuttles could and should be upgraded. Once in Space a shuttle with it’s large storage could make a great Earth to moon reusable vehicle. I do not support closing down the Shuttle system till Aries is ready. I cannot believe we are putting ourselves in this position. It almost makes me believe there is something else, we just don’t know about it.