Which case is best for long-term archival storage of DVDRs -- standard or jewel type?

vbimport

#1

There are a increasing number of reports stating that DVDRs may become unreadable after time, not because of deteriorating dye, but from slight warping of the disc itself. Players can only tolerate a certain amount of variance in the laser-to-disc distance and/or the vibration caused by an out-of-plane disc.

Standard DVD cases provide a DVDR a dark storage environment to protect their dye from light; a low-tension retainer to protect the disc’s hub from damage; and often a ridge in the case disc recess to support the outer rim of the disc. All good things.

But what about the stability of the case? Even the best, standard-thickness, hollywood-movie-grade case available will easily flex with a disc in it. And since the disc’s rim is in contact with case, when the case flexes the disc must flex too. There are a lot of common storage scenarios where the case could be in a position where it could force the disc into a slightly twisted orientation for months or years at a time. And the standard thickness DVD cases offered in bulk quantities from most e-merchants are less sturdy and even more vulnerable to warping a disc…

Jewel cases are not commonly recommended for DVDR storage because many of them use a high-tension retainer which can damage the disc hub upon removal; also, even with a case insert to help block light, they don’t provide a disc the darkness a typical DVD case can.

But a jewel case has at least one great advantage over a DVD case: a much more rigid, flex-resistant case. Since the disc is only supported by the hub retainer (not an outer ridge support land like DVD cases provide) the case would have to be severely twisted before it made contact with the outer rim of the disc; therefore, this case design can’t warp a disc. There are plenty of jewel case designs sporting a low-tension hub retainer, so that needn’t be a problem. (Most DVD cases have a very stubborn disc hub release mechanism, which often won’t release without a snap, and may require significant flexing of the disc as it is being pulled out.) Also, a jewel case can be stored in a cabinet to protect the disc dye from light.

So what do you guys think is the best case for archiving DVDRs? :slight_smile:


#2

Interesting question, but it’s not a clear cut between jewel cases and DVD-style cases.

DVD-style cases come in many flavours, and if some do have a low-tension retainer and offer support for the outer ring, some others have high-tension retainers (far too strong IMO, much stronger than most jewel cases actually), and/or no support for the outer ring.

I think most jewel cases are fine, just that for long-term archiving of media that is sensitive to UV light (like TY) it’s better to store them in a dark place for extra safeness. Maybe it’s being paranoied, though. :bigsmile:

DVD-style cases have to be choosen wisely, they can be very different among brands/models. Some are pure crap because the holding system is far to strong and this may induce, during handling, hub damage or even worse. Some others are perfectly fine. Mine have low-tension retainers and no support for the outer ring, so I guess I’m good. :cool:

Now about the long-term slight warping that would be due to a soft case, I haven’t met any evidence (as yet) that this is indeed an issue. What “reports” are you talking about? Do you have some links? I’m extremely interested. :iagree:


#3

Both jewel and DVD cases are intended to be stored vertical (on edge), so warpage would not be a concern. DVD cases have the advantage of being black, and so will protect the disc from light. That fact alone makes them my 1st choice. Clear cases of any kind should be avoided unless you keep them in a closed case or box.

“Archiving DVD’s” may well turn out to be a conflict in terms. We have no evidence to support the notion that recordable optical discs are suitable for archival purposes. Although the single most important factor may be the person who is doing the archiving, and how well they understand the process. Like CDR’s, DVDR will probably be outdated before any certain knowledge about longevity is obtained. But it’s likely that the replacements for DVD will be very similar in construction, so the same issues will exist. Until we are free of organic dyes, longevity is a big question mark at best.


#4

what about using those 200 disc case logic wallets??


#5

just be real careful inserting and removing them, I have had good luck
with those


#6

I dont actually have one of those, I just use those ‘ultra flat’ jewel cases. They take up less space than regular size jewel cases:


#7

After I hit 300+ disks I gave up on those slim’s, one cracked and ruined my backup


#8

I’ve only got 50 or so discs. I never take them outside my home, and the stack is only 60 cases tall. :bigsmile:


#9

Now about the long-term slight warping that would be due to a soft case, I haven’t met any evidence (as yet) that this is indeed an issue. What “reports” are you talking about? Do you have some links? I’m extremely interested.

I have read a number posts here (sorry, can’t find them now :o ) where forum members and industry experts have stated that read error accumalations over time may be caused by disc warpage instead of only dye deterioration. Particularly, paper labels used on DVDRs may cause future readability problems strictly from a slight disc warpage – the label may shrink with time and that uneven pull on the top of the disc may cause a concave (from top) or convex (from bottom) type of warpage. By extention, I pondered the possibility of a disc warping from a soft, flexable storage case.

“Archiving DVD’s” may well turn out to be a conflict in terms. We have no evidence to support the notion that recordable optical discs are suitable for archival purposes.

Agreed. :iagree: That’s why many of us use the best media possible so there may still be good data remaining in a few years from now when a better archival medium becomes available. What is frightning, though, are reports of excellent burns on quality media suffering significant deterioation after several months. I would hate to find my archives ruined after a year or so because the case warped the disc, although with proper storage in a good case this seems unlikely to occur.

Does anyone know of an e-merchant who sells a quality, standard thickness DVD case with a low-tension hub retainer and no disc rim support land? Checking out places like Supermediastore, Rima, etc., they all seem to have varying manufacturers, case designs and overal build quality from one batch to the next; it is a “crap shoot” of whether you recieve a good case or not. :rolleyes:


#10

I use the standard DVD cases from Rima, both single and 2-disc types. They are the type you seek, the disc release is very soft. There’s a small ledge at the outer part of the disc that helps support it, but it does not contact the burned part of the disc. They also sell a “cheapo” type case which I have not tried.


#11

I use the standard DVD cases from Rima, both single and 2-disc types. They are the type you seek, the disc release is very soft. There’s a small ledge at the outer part of the disc that helps support it, but it does not contact the burned part of the disc.
Thanks. :slight_smile:

Are they always the same type each time you order? Do they ever have discounted shipping? (Case of 100 = $20 USD; UPS ground shipping = $11.28 ! )


#12

For most discs I use slimline jewel cases. For anything important I use Amaray branded DVD cases which seem to be the favoured cases of the DVD movie industry. These will hold the disc frimly but apply very little pressure to the hub - and most importantly they keep the surface of the DVD well away from contact with any material except thin air.


#13

This I know about. Mostly correct, even if the explanation from Memorex is different.http://club.cdfreaks.com/showpost.php?p=1306499&postcount=17

By extention, I pondered the possibility of a disc warping from a soft, flexable storage case.
OK, so no actual reports of warping from the cases, then? :wink: You naughty, naughty alarmist! :bigsmile:


#14

Well if you buy some normal dvd size cases, make sure they are good quality. I bought some about 6 months ago which seemed like the clear plastic was made out of cling film :P. anyway if your going for space, and a good way to archive, i would suggest the slim dvd cases. It makes it easy to put in the inlay, and saves space.


#15

disk warpage?

maybe that’s what caused all my memorex and G05’s and princos to be so bad!

Hmmmmmmmm, naw they were shiet to begin with


#16

For anything important I use Amaray branded DVD cases which seem to be the favoured cases of the DVD movie industry.
Where can these be purchased?

OK, so no actual reports of warping from the cases, then? :wink:

None that I’m aware of so far regarding standard DVD cases.

You naughty, naughty alarmist!

I have spent my life troubleshooting electro-mechanical equipment, spotting possible problems before they get out of hand, and engineering improvements to minor design flaws to help reduce service calls. I guess that mentality qualifies me as a true alarmist. :eek: :iagree: :slight_smile:


#17

Amaray all the way for me. I have tried cheaper DVD cases and they are just not worth it. Jewel cases are fine for CDs but not for DVDs - I wouldn’t even put a Ritek in one :Z


#18

I hope you didn’t take offence, it was only kidding. :slight_smile: - and I understand your concern! “Spotting possible problems before they go out of hand”, whenever possible, is certainly the way to go. :iagree: (according one has the necessary time of course…)


#19

Why, actually?


#20

What do you think about these?