Where is Daemon-tools?

vbimport

#1

Anybody know where the current web site for Daemon-tools are?

The previous sites (Daemon-tools .com/.org/.net) have dissappeared and haven’t worked for several weeks.


#2

Hmm indeed… strange!

But okay, you can still download Deamon tools from http://www.filemirrors.com/


#3

Originally posted by Dee-ehn
[B]Hmm indeed… strange!

But okay, you can still download Deamon tools from http://www.filemirrors.com/ [/B]

Well, yeah… But I was wanting the web site.

As for using filemirrors… Well, to be honest, I don’t trust using that as a source of files! I’ve been there, but I don’t like using it.

With all the people making trojans and viruses, it’s not exactly hard to start throwing around virused or trojaned stuff. I only get stuff from the authors own pages or from very trusted places that mirror them after THEY have gotten it from the author.

And I’ve seen a number of files listed by FileMirrors with the same name and version number, but appear to be a few bytes different in size.

But thanks for your reply.


#4

http://www.forest.impress.co.jp/library/daemontools.html

http://www.skycn.com/soft/2344.html

mostly japanese sites - but i think ya can figure out which link is the one you want. the daemon people proly want you to switch to alcohol :wink:


#5

@Bumpy: install a (descent) Antivirus application on your system, this is the only way to protect you against viruses.

The difference in files sizes can be quite easy to explain: different versions of an application (e.g. pre-installed language packs).


#6

Originally posted by Dee-ehn
[B]@Bumpy: install a (descent) Antivirus application on your system, this is the only way to protect you against viruses.

The difference in files sizes can be quite easy to explain: different versions of an application (e.g. pre-installed language packs). [/B]

Contrary to popular belief, an antivirus program will do nothing for most malicious programs.

Oh sure, it’ll detect many viruses, but not all of them. Antivirus programs only detect the more common ones, not all of them. It’s a very deliberate decision on the AV people. There are too many viruses and too many ways to write them to be able to get all of them, so they only concentrate on the more likely ones.

It will also do nothing for anything that is just plain malacious. For example, something that has been patched to overwrite your files. An AV or anti-trojan program is not likely to catch that. And of course, there are things far far more sneaky than that.

Antivirus programs give a false sense of security simply because people don’t realise how they do (not) work. They only detect common viruses, nothing more. Not all viruses. Few, if any, trojans. And sometimes some of the common actions that a virus might do, like trying to overwrite your boot sector or something.

They have major limitations.

As for the differences in file sizes…

Well, I can’t think of a real example right off the top of my head, but it would be something like this…

prog_231_eng.zip

You’ve got the filename, the version number, and the language. And, of course, in some cases, the programs have all the languages built in, so there wouldn’t be different language versions anyway.

FileMirrors.com just collects links. It doesn’t care whether it’s an honest place or some warez place.

A little bit of common sense… Strike that… a lot of common sense is required when you use something like filemirrors or a warez site, etc.

It’s a lot better to only get files from the author’s site or from known legitimate mirrors.


#7

if filemirrors reports a lot of people using a mirror - its a pretty safe bet that its the right one.


#8

Originally posted by ckin2001
if filemirrors reports a lot of people using a mirror - its a pretty safe bet that its the right one.

FileMirrors doesn’t give a count of how often the file has been downloaded.

When you search for a file, all it gives is the source domain, the clickable link, the aprox size, and the date it was added to their database.

No indication what so ever about how often it has been used. Nor a hash (crc or md5) to compare it against other links.

Every search result & link stand on their own status. Nothing what so ever to indicate its quality. The user takes their chances with each one they click.


#9

http://web1.athen215.server4free.de/phpBB2/ <-- Forum
http://web1.athen215.server4free.de/daemon_tools.htm <–Download page


#10

New Norton Corp. version is more than descent. There are also free on line scanners which are updated everyday. Like this: h**p://housecall.trendmicro.com/housecall/start_corp.asp – Need broadband though otherwise it will take a week to scan. But all you need to do is download the file and not unzip or execute it. Also to scan on line just target the 1 file the folder is in and it will be done scanning in just a few seconds. You can also use ad-aware which is free to scan for spyware and crap. Scan it with several anti-virus programs or through an on line scan. if ALL come back with positive results then chances are its safe. I think you are being too paranoid.


#11

Originally posted by xtacydima
New Norton Corp. version is more than descent. There are
Scan it with several anti-virus programs or through an on line scan. if ALL come back with positive results then chances are its safe. I think you are being too paranoid.

You may not be aware of this, but the AV companies do cooperate when they pick the more dangerous, more likely viruses to protect against. They do some on their own, of course, but there is a lot of cooperation among them.

That means there’s a lot of overlap among the various AV programs. Meaning the rarer viruses are still likely not going to be detected. Even if you run 5 virus scanners I doubt you’d be checking for even 50% of the known viruses.

And as I said, AV programs are not going to detect malicious code that isn’t a virus. A program that’s been patched to delete your files (or something more sneaky) isn’t going to be detected because if it doesn’t replicate then it’s not a virus and is outside of the scope of an AV program.

Same is true for many trojans, for that matter.

A LOT of newbies think that AV scanners are the ultimate in security against malicious stuff (whether viruses, trojans, or other malicious or buggy programming) and it just isn’t so.

If you want security to test a program, the only way to be sure is to run it on a seperate computer or inside a virtual computer. (The free Bochs pc emulator usually works well enough to do that.)

As for me being paranoid…

Well, remember, I was originally asking about the Deamon tools web site, not the program.

But still, I’ve been involved in computers for 20 years now. (Yeah, since the days of 8 bit micros and BASIC in ROM. I remember when 16k was considered a lot of memory. I’ve been using computers longer than some of you readers have been alive!)

I’ve seen a lot of things. I’ve seen a lot of warez stuff that was not what it claimed to be.

I’ve known people (back in the days of dial-up BBSing), who would write viruses (or try to, their skills were rather pathetic). People who were quite willing to pass off dangerous code as something that was safe and fun to use.

The internet hasn’t magically changed people into nice honest folk.

I’m not afraid of virsues. I can do more damage to my system all by myself than even the most dangerous virus could even fantasize about. In fact, over the years, I have done a lot of damage to my own system all by myself, without any help from a virus.

But I’m still rather pleased with myself that in all my years of computing, I have never been hit by a virus (except for those that I’ve tested deliberately.)

Those programs on FileMirrors may indeed be legit programs, but at the very least, it does raise the question of why the file sizes were different among files that should be the same?

If they are they are indeed the same program, then why are they different sizes? It’s possible the distributor just stuck an advertisement into the file. But it’s also possible they did something else instead.


#12

If you want security to test a program, the only way to be sure is to run it on a seperate computer or inside a virtual computer. (The free Bochs pc emulator usually works well enough to do that.)

havent you just answered your question here?

But still, I’ve been involved in computers for 20 years now. (Yeah, since the days of 8 bit micros and BASIC in ROM. I remember when 16k was considered a lot of memory. I’ve been using computers longer than some of you readers have been alive!)

how based on this queote can you then say:

I can do more damage to my system all by myself than even the most dangerous virus could even fantasize about. In fact, over the years, I have done a lot of damage to my own system all by myself, without any help from a virus.

Well, I only been doing advanced tech support and such not for approx 12 years and you def have me beat. But I have never caused damage to my own machine. I only reparied it harware/software when it faulted on its own, as well the many others I have always worked on. And yes not every virus is picked up but serious ones usually are. I haven’t had a problem yet with any virus. My system seems to work just fine for me as yours may work fine for you. I still think you are a bit paranoid. Why don’t you take your own advice and test the dl you grab off another test pc. If many users here point you to a site where they have had seccuess with a file download, I think it safe:)


#13

Originally posted by xtacydima
[B]

Well, I only been doing advanced tech support and such not for approx 12 years and you def have me beat. But I have never caused damage to my own machine. I only reparied it harware/software when it faulted on its own, as well the many
[/B]

Let’s see…

I’ve accidently fdisk’ed the wrong drive.

I’ve accidently format’ed the wrong drive.

I’ve been in the wrong directly when I did “DEL .” or “DelTree .

While doing some programming, I’d use the wrong BIOS call parameter and instead of reading directly from the drive, I’d write directly to the drive.

I’ve accidnetly forgotten to back up important new files before wiping the drive and reisntalling my OS.

On an older computer with EZ-BIOS (to use a drive larger than 8gig), I managed to delete the critical boot code and had to figure out how to manually restore it, because the installer would only do it when it reformatted the drive, which was definetly not appropriate.

And so on.

It certainly isn’t an every day problem, or even every year. But they’ve still happened. And in every case it was my own fault.

(And that doesn’t include the buggy programs, power going off before the disk cache gets written and damaing the FAT, etc. etc. I’ve never damaged a flash BIOS. At least not yet…)

[/QUOTE]
I still think you are a bit paranoid.
Why don’t you take your own advice and test the dl you grab off another test pc. If many users here point you to a site where they have had seccuess with a file download, I think it safe:) [/B][/QUOTE]

Because I wasn’t looking for a the DeamonTools driver. I was looking for the web site.

And FileMirrors.com just does recent links. Not just often used ones, but any / all of them. If you use GetRight and you deliberately download a virus / trojaned file, then that link will indeed show up in FileMirrors collection of links. (Although depending on how common that filename is, your particular link may or may not show up in the random list of links it shows when you do a search for it.)

As for Bochs, although it is very useful, it’s not even vaguely perfect. It does have bugs, including in the cpu emulation. Some stuff just wont run. And it’s very very slow. They emulate every single instruction. You can test some stuff, but others wont run or run too slowly to be practical. (And even then, it was only back in January when they doubled the performance. Prior to that, it wasn’t even fast enough to play with.)

But yes, I do indeed do that sometimes. I have a copy of Windows set up on a Bochs virtual disk that I do use occasionally for testing stuff. I’m very glad I found Bochs.

This thread has gotten a bit off the subject of where the Deamon-Tools web site disappeared to.


#14

as hinted earlier, the alcohol people are the former daemon tools developers. any question of daemons whereabouts is probably related to the development of a non-freeware alternative.


#15

[cut & past]
Please note that the official DAEMON Tools URL is: http://www.daemon-tools.cc/ . Also note that all posts, topics, users, etc… have been imported from old support board. The downloads section is fairly empty right now, but will be filled ASAP.
[/cut & past]