When Ripping at Lossless, Does it Matter What Software You Use?

vbimport

#1

I’ve just bought a PC to connect to my Home Theater and all of the options for rippers and players has me confused. Basically, I want to create 1:1 copies of DVDs to my HD and I don’t want to burn them to blank media. I know I need AnyDVD, but if I’m just going to be ripping at lossless is there any difference in image/sound quality between the various rippers like AnyDVD, CloneDVD, DVDShrink, or DVD-Rebuilder? Basically, I want the highest quality video and sound.


#2

All you need is AnyDVD for this since you want the easiest solution as it has a rip feature on it to rip the DVD as a 1:1 copy to hard drive so you can use a program like DVDshrink to compress and burn to a DVD.


#3

I’ve read that DVD-Rebuilder plus the encoders it supports has superior image quality, but is that just referring to the image quality when burned to a DVD-R and not ripped to a HD?


#4

[QUOTE=solrage;2507006]I’ve just bought a PC to connect to my Home Theater and all of the options for rippers and players has me confused. Basically, I want to create 1:1 copies of DVDs to my HD and I don’t want to burn them to blank media. I know I need AnyDVD, but if I’m just going to be ripping at lossless is there any difference in image/sound quality between the various rippers like AnyDVD, CloneDVD, DVDShrink, or DVD-Rebuilder? Basically, I want the highest quality video and sound.[/QUOTE]

You can also use DVDFab HD Decrypter which is free :slight_smile:


#5

[QUOTE=solrage;2507013]I’ve read that DVD-Rebuilder plus the encoders it supports has superior image quality, but is that just referring to the image quality when burned to a DVD-R and not ripped to a HD?[/QUOTE]

It refers to the image quality after compression.

Most popular DVD compression programs are what they call transcoders.

A transcoder accepts that the studio has done the perfect job of optimising motion vectors and certain other parameters and uses these as they are.

In reality studios don’t care if it’s fully optimised or not as all they’re interested in is that the quality on DVD matches their standards.

DVD Rebuilder is a full re-encoder that redoes everything from scratch and fully optimises everything throughout the DVD.

It takes a bit longer but the improvement in quality for difficult sources is very noticeable.

If you’re only interested in ripping 1:1 copies then I’d also recommend the free version of DVDFab as that really is all you need.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#6

[QUOTE=Wombler;2507043]
If you’re only interested in ripping 1:1 copies then I’d also recommend the free version of DVDFab as that really is all you need.

[B]Wombler[/B][/QUOTE]

I agree with wombler if you doing is just basic ripping just go with DVDfab HD.

You can download it at. Make sure it’s the DVDfab HD version that you get.

http://www.dvdfab.com/free.htm


#7

[QUOTE=Wombler;2507043]It refers to the image quality after compression. Most popular DVD compression programs are what they call transcoders. A transcoder accepts that the studio has done the perfect job of optimising motion vectors and certain other parameters and uses these as they are. In reality studios don’t care if it’s fully optimised or not as all they’re interested in is that the quality on DVD matches their standards. DVD Rebuilder is a full re-encoder that redoes everything from scratch and fully optimises everything throughout the DVD. It takes a bit longer but the improvement in quality for difficult sources is very noticeable. If you’re only interested in ripping 1:1 copies then I’d also recommend the free version of DVDFab as that really is all you need.

[B]Wombler[/B][/QUOTE]Thanks for the information. So if I want the best image quality is it it worth it to re-encode the DVDs and THEN rip them or does the increase in quality only apply if I’m compressing them at all?


#8

[QUOTE=solrage;2507272]Thanks for the information. So if I want the best image quality is it it worth it to re-encode the DVDs and THEN rip them or does the increase in quality only apply if I’m compressing them at all?[/QUOTE]

Sorry but you’ve picked me up incorrectly there.

Ripping is always the first step in the process since it’s necessary to remove the copy protection before you can do anything else.

Secondly, the difference in quality I referred to is between the two compression methods, transcoding and re-encoding.

So if you want maximum quality then just rip the files and they’ll be identical in quality to the original.

If you’re short of space and want to compress the files then the difference in quality between the two compression methods comes into play.

HTH.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#9

Thanks again, Wombler. I think that answered my question.


#10

[QUOTE=solrage;2507483]Thanks again, Wombler. I think that answered my question.[/QUOTE]

My pleasure and if you’ve any further questions feel free to ask away.

Welcome to MyCE BTW and I hope you find it informative here. :flower:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#11

[QUOTE=Wombler;2507579]My pleasure and if you’ve any further questions feel free to ask away.

Welcome to MyCE BTW and I hope you find it informative here. :flower:

[B]Wombler[/B][/QUOTE]Well, one last question: If I rip the DVDs to .iso at lossless quality will the image quality really be as good as that of the actual DVD? Comparing some of the .iso’s I’ve ripped played on PowerDVD they seem to have a bit more grain and pixelation (blu-ray and STD) compared to the DVDs when played on my Oppo. Perhaps it’s just be my imagination; it’s hard to tell.

Also, thanks for the warm welcome. I’ve already learned quite a bit from this place just from browsing through the results that turn up on Google. :slight_smile:


#12

[QUOTE=solrage;2507794]Well, one last question: If I rip the DVDs to .iso at lossless quality will the image quality really be as good as that of the actual DVD? Comparing some of the .iso’s I’ve ripped played on PowerDVD they seem to have a bit more grain and pixelation (blu-ray and STD) compared to the DVDs when played on my Oppo. Perhaps it’s just be my imagination; it’s hard to tell.

Also, thanks for the warm welcome. I’ve already learned quite a bit from this place just from browsing through the results that turn up on Google. :)[/QUOTE]

Could be the Oppo has a different decoder and applies Temporal or other filtering. If you burned one of your ISOs back to a disk and played it on your Oppo, the picture would be identical.


#13

I figured the difference was probably just because of the decoders. I know the Oppo is supposed to have one of the best out there today for blu-ray; if I wasn’t looking really close I probably couldn’t tell much of a difference. Thanks.