When do you want Serial ATA in your PC?

I posted this in the General Hardware Forum here.

When do you want Serial ATA HDD and Serial ATA ODD drives in your PC? (ODD for Optical Disk Drive.)

Not on this system ; When i buy a complete new motherboard.

voted never

serial ATA technologie is already old when the first devices come out.
serial ATA 2 is already on his way with a life expectancy of 3 years.
then als moving hd’s will be a thing of the past.
sorry but i don’t believe in serial ATA

The industry is screwing the consumer on this one. You know these companies have to pay for R & D… Something is going on that is shady. It seems that since Serial ATA is supposed to be the next step, and it is more than ready to go…but NONE of the major hard drive manufacturing comanies have released one. What’s up with that? (I’m not talking about that small poratble BS either).

Something is fishy. :cop: :cop: :cop:

I think it’s just that none of the HDD manufacturers want to risk too much because there are yet no motherboard chipsets integrated with Serial ATA. There are only discrete Serial ATA chipsets and add-on PCI cards with such chipsets.

I also think going directly from P-ATA to S-ATA II is better. The maximum data transfer rate of 150MB/s and 300MB/s is not that important to the average users as long as most IDE/ATA hard drives can only write files at 20MB/s to 30MB/s (not the peak speed) at the best, but Serial ATA II seems to incorporate more advanced features usually only found in beyond the latest SCSI specifications.

I bought about 20 hard drives for my personal use for the last three years. A few were SCSI and the rest were P-ATA/IDE. Having multiple IDE HDDs and ODDs in one cheap ($10 to $40 usually) PC case has always been the worst nightmare to me and also many other people mainly because of the short, broad, and inflexible cables. I haven’t seen anyone yet who complain about the use of Firewire (IEEE 1394) or USB 1.1/2.0 external CD/DVD writers. Even those who use them with IDE HDDs are very happy compared to when they were using only internal IDE drives.

My problem with ATA/PI are the cables: With 6 drives installed, even round cables consume some space in the tower…SATA is the solution :slight_smile:

a very very very expensive solution for the cable problem :bigsmile:

Originally posted by Maelstrom
a very very very expensive solution for the cable problem :bigsmile:

You mean the rounded cable? Serial ATA is a very practical solution though it cannot yet replace SCSI or USB.

im not spending a lot of money on serial ata only because the cables are smaller. (reffer to alexnoe)

btw
like my SCSI setup
so i won’t swap so quickly

Originally posted by Maelstrom
im not spending a lot of money on serial ata only because the cables are smaller. (reffer to alexnoe)

Very few want to do so. I don’t see any reason why Serial ATA drives and motherboards should cost more than conventional Parallel ATA drives and motherboards. It’s a bit early now so there are only add-on cards and bridge/converters on most markets and that is why they cost more. Motherboards with discrete Serial ATA controller chipsets now cost as little as 70 USD (the lowest I’ve seen yet.) Integrated chipsets will cost even less. The HDD manufacturers will not just produce a few thousand units. They will produce millions of units.

they might release them at very high prices, relatively, in order to cash in on early adopters. when you go to this solution, dont you end up with an almost entirely new rig?

The sooner the better… S-ATA means more space in my case, since the P-ATA cables are consuming way too much space.

The only thing I worry about is the price of the first S-ATA devices… I guess it will be quite high and that’s nothing good… not good for us, the consumers and ofcourse for the development of the technology.

I hope Serial ATA will help the HDD and optical drive manufacturers to sell more drives because it allows the users to install and add drives more easily. It’s good for both the industry and the end-users.

When SATA-II comes out. From all the reviews and reports, SATA is nothing special and certainly no major improment over current ATA133. Saving my money and wait 'til Hammer MP, DDR-II, and SATA-II to come out.

I’m all in favor of SATA and SATA II, the cables are really light and thin (came with motherboard). But I just bought my nice new computer with parallel ATA drives so I’m in no rush for either, I voted Q3 2003.

Originally posted by BadReligionPR
I’m all in favor of SATA and SATA II, the cables are really light and thin (came with motherboard). But I just bought my nice new computer with parallel ATA drives so I’m in no rush for either, I voted Q3 2003.

What will you do with those cables?? :bigsmile:

Originally posted by Kenshin
[B]

What will you do with those cables?? :bigsmile: [/B]

Necklace anyone?

I think that seagate and maxtor have released dual parallel and serial ata150 drives. They cost about US$75 dearer than the basic parallel and about US$55 more than the serial ata only versions.

I can’t see the point in upgrading to serial ATA.
The major point that manufactureres are pushing is that

  1. Save space on motherboard
  2. Increased bandwidth.

On point 1, it lowers manufacturers costs, but we get charged the same, and they don’t actually have any plans for that little bit of space that they actually save. Maybe it saves them 3 cents per board on on unprinted PCB . LOL!

On point 1, until serial ata is attached directly to the RAM interface then it’s gonna be stuck on the PCI bus which is limited to 133MB/s anyway. And in addition, I hope that HD’s never actually get that fast that they max out the PCI bus anyway. I hate to have my music interrupted,which happens to be streaming down the PCI bus anyway.
Until they change how the HD controllers are connected into the system, there is no point.

Originally posted by debro
I can’t see the point in upgrading to serial ATA.
The major point that manufactureres are pushing is that

  1. Save space on motherboard
  2. Increased bandwidth.

Not even in 2004 and 2005? If there is no point to migrate to Serial ATA, why do you say “upgrading” to it?

Serial ATA has been delayed too long. Space saving applies to not only the motherboards, but also to the drive connectors and cables.

PCI 32-bit/33-MHz is limited to 133MB/s but that is why there are PCI-X and PCI Express (3GIO) that are also for Gigabit and 10-Gigabit LAN and many other things that demand more bandwidth.

Single IDE HDD write speed has never gone above 50MB/s and not even 30MB/s if we are talking about sustained transfer rate. If Serial ATA 150MB/s does not give performance improvements over Parallal ATA-133, it has been the same with ATA-100 and ATA-66. Most recent motherboards and hard drives use ATA-100 or ATA-133, not ATA-33 or ATA-66. Of course, there are performance advantages but it is just what you measure that what you get.

The one thing I like most about the introduction of Serial ATA is that it is easier for those who first install hard drives and optical disk drives into PC case because the cables are more user-friendly like USB cables and phone lines and there is no more need to set the jumpers to configure as master or slave drive.

From what ive read of it looks promising however… i wonder at this time when its not hit critical mass … i say q3 2003 not before i regularly upgrade however only when things are easily avail and carry a good rep… eg liteon cdrws i went from plex 16x to liteon 48

Originally posted by Kenshin
[B]

Not even in 2004 and 2005? If there is no point to migrate to Serial ATA, why do you say “upgrading” to it?

PCI 32-bit/33-MHz is limited to 133MB/s but that is why there are PCI-X and PCI Express (3GIO) that are also for Gigabit and 10-Gigabit LAN and many other things that demand more bandwidth.

The one thing I like most about the introduction of Serial ATA is that it is easier for those who first install hard drives and optical disk drives into PC case because the cables are more user-friendly like USB cables and phone lines and there is no more need to set the jumpers to configure as master or slave drive. [/B]

Upgrading to it because it is new, and ever so slightly faster.
150MB/s limited to 133MB/s across PCI bus. It won’t be much point “upgrading” to it until they actually make some serious hardware modifications.

If someone can’t figure out how to connect two devices to a computer vas a master and a slave, how could we possibly expect them to be able to actually install windows reliably, load all the necessary drivers and actually maintain their own system.

In 6 months as a PC hardware salesman, i learnt the number of system/network admins that actually knew how to install hardware (less than 5%) and the number of them that actually installed windows without making a cock-up of it, again 5%.

Quite frankly, if they don’t have the capability to understand basic hook-up of IDE devices, what makes them think they can half configure an OS, or worse, a network, and expect it to work well. They might as well go and buy an IMAC and save themselves the trouble.

Just because people can do something, doesn’t mean they should. You need to have a basic across the board understanding of computers to start looking inside them.

Maybe we should have PC license, just like cars. LOL!