When did you turn digital?

vbimport

#1

First, a bit of backhistory about me. My grandad passed away 8 years ago from a stroke, and as my parents cleaned out his house, we stumbled across a box of tapes which they brought back. They weren’t anything special on these tapes - Just films he recorded over the years. He was a hermit, so he didn’t go out much. :slight_smile:

Anyways, I watched some of them, and instantly I realised that I had a massive obsession of recording things off the TV - Because I liked this idea of recording shows and films and it would be there to watch, again and again, for forever. Or nearly, anyway :stuck_out_tongue:

Anyway, it started off with the 2005 series of Doctor Who. Roll on 5 years later, and I still must have at least 100 tapes, some of which are my grandads, and tapes I collected over the years. I had become a obsessive tape collector - I would regularly ransack and buy VHS tapes (and cassettes :stuck_out_tongue: ) from charity shops, tapes that relatives had given to me.

I must have in a box at the bottom of my room a box of VHS tapes, at least 100 of them. Originally, I was skeptical about moving onto the digital age so I for years held out until roughly August last year - In which case I saw a DVD recorder that was going cheap on eBay - Mine was a cheap Visitron DVD recorder, but it was brand new and boxed and delivered all for a cheap sum of £40.

It was the cheapness of converting to digital which was why I did convert, along with the other reasons, because originally I saw no relevance in moving to digital - Most of my shows I don’t think I would be bothered in watching in say ten years time. I invested in a cheap £40 DVD recorder largely because using my Sony mono VHS recorder (1991) (Bought from a charity shop for a £10 - I did my bit for charity! :bigsmile: ) was starting to become uneconomical - Tapes were expensive compared to the peanuts you can pay for DVD-R (DVD-R were roughly 1/5 of tapes, maybe?)

Space didn’t concern me, I had more than enough room for tapes just bunged into the bottom of the box - but overall it was just cheaper to transfer to DVD, and I don’t think I have picked a better time to do so - I can bag a 50 pack DVD-R for £5 from my local supplier - Which probably would have cost treble as much in 2005.

It’s digital, so I can get perfect image reproduction again and again no matter how many times I watch it - I had double the resolution of VHS tapes, but image quality doesn’t concern me (I could happily watch a VHS tape made in 1984, for example)

The main reason was for me was it is copyable and very cheap to do so - So if friends wanted copies, I could make copies and it wouldn’t dent my wallet. How discs are made means there is no degrading of magnetic tape to deal with (Discs skipping if your not careful though! :Z) and if the disc does skip, I could just download the source again :slight_smile:

Most of my TV rips are now AVI rips bunged on a disc - Easily accessible, and of course, they are much smaller than VHS tapes :slight_smile:

When did you move to the DVD age?

Now, just got to back up my radio recordings onto my portable hard drive :doh: :bigsmile:


#2

Well Chad I can’t remember when We went digital ,All I know is I got two garbage bags of Vhs tapes that we can’t play because the players we have are all dvd players , so as of next weeks pickup there will be two bags of movies on vhs tapes going to the land fill.We also have four or five non digital tv sets which we have cable and need cable boxes to get any good stations.Ahhhhh the junk you pick up over the years


#3

marloyd . If some of the VHS tapes you have are commercial movie ones . Why not donate then to a charity like Goodwill or the Salvation Army . They can make a little by reselling them & some people still have VHS players & use them.

I wasn’t very satisfied with the results of going VHS to DVD but I have a couple I haven’t found any way but VHS . I used standalone for this. I tried to use one of the adapters Roxio Easy VHS to DVD . This proved to not be compatible with Vista even if it was supposed to be . It even caused some problems with other software & I was glad I made a backup right before installing it . I went to a condition before the install. After that I made sure & removed anything else Roxio & haven’t installed any of their software since.
I recommend the GREX if you do need to copy commercial VHS to disc . I used this on the standalone DVD recorders I have. I still haven’t tried another adapter for my computer to do this. If I seriously wanted to do this I would find a compatible adapter . Buy a good Super VHS player (because of better output) . Then run the out put from it through the GREX to the adapter & onto the hard drive . Then burn that to a DVD disc or just leave it on an external hard drive & play from that.


#4

Hey Marloyd,

Wow, I wish I had struck gold like that :smiley:

I would advise, infact if they are recordable cassettes to borrow a VHS player and see what you can find on them. You will be surprised, but PLEASE don’t throw them out yet - If you pick up some old TV footage of archives, it might be worthwhile dubbing over to DVD - That’s what I did for many of my shows I recorded, what I didn’t get as AVI Rips from t’internet :wink:

You will be surprised what you find :slight_smile:


#5

Digital Video.

Well i went to it back in 2003 when i first got my 4x pioneer dvd+/-R drive, i never had much VHS tapes, so i didnt miss much. My mother is missing the old VHS player (a four head panasonic), she got used to record her favorite shows and watch them later.

Audio.
I never got really into this digital crap madness, when the say to you that cd’s sound better (ok they sound better if you listen to lady gaga). I have a huge amount of analogue tapes and some of them sound great even after 15+ years. Today i got two more TDK SA60, so that i can test my [B]Teac W-760R[/B] that has new belts :wink: and i can proudly say that my baby sounds great (i had it since 1997).

So i can say only one thing.
Analogue sound rules. Btw, i can also say that many stereo VHS players were able to record and playback music much better than hi-end cd player.
Digital, necessary evil so that you go out and by new stuff (cd’s dvd’s and blu-ray).


#6

[QUOTE=cholla;2579407]
I wasn’t very satisfied with the results of going VHS to DVD but I have a couple I haven’t found any way but VHS . I used standalone for this. I tried to use one of the adapters Roxio Easy VHS to DVD . This proved to not be compatible with Vista even if it was supposed to be . It even caused some problems with other software & I was glad I made a backup right before installing it . I went to a condition before the install. After that I made sure & removed anything else Roxio & haven’t installed any of their software since.
I recommend the GREX if you do need to copy commercial VHS to disc . I used this on the standalone DVD recorders I have. I still haven’t tried another adapter for my computer to do this. If I seriously wanted to do this I would find a compatible adapter . Buy a good Super VHS player (because of better output) . Then run the out put from it through the GREX to the adapter & onto the hard drive . Then burn that to a DVD disc or just leave it on an external hard drive & play from that.[/QUOTE]

This is rather timely. Just yesterday a client of mine asked for help transferring homemade VHS tapes to DVD. We went to BestBuy, picked up a $50 Dazzle usb capture device with Pinnacle 12 included and I transferred 3 tapes from their camera to disk to show them how to do it. I used DVDFlick with mpeg2 copy and made three DVD’s, I could have used the included Pinnacle software but I already know DVDFlcik. No problems encountered, but this is an XP box not Vista.

As for me, I’ve always been a digital boy in an analog world. :bigsmile:


#7

I sense this thread is going to get mega! :smiley:

To answer Vroom though, I’ve always preferred the “honesty” of cassette sound with the background hiss compared to the sterile CD production. It’s not that it’s bad kit, I have dozens of recorded CD I used to store music and they sound great, but a soulless White Album & Magical Mystery Tour on CD ruined it for me :frowning:

They record samples which are then played back - And do not accurately reflect the recorded source. Audio cassettes, whilst have appalling acoustics, and dropped off after a certain Hz (to my knowlegde) were still an okay, listenable media.

Many of my tapes bought from charity shops (I bought some Sony cassettes from 1977 :slight_smile: ) are becoming so faded they are fading horribly, the sound is becoming quieter etc… Just the average result of a cassette. For simple stuff like voice however, mixed correctly using high end gear, will sound much, much better than anything a CD can reproduce.

Tapes are re-recordable as well :wink:


#8

[QUOTE=Chad_Bronson;2579415]I sense this thread is going to get mega! :smiley:

To answer Vroom though, I’ve always preferred the “honesty” of cassette sound with the background hiss compared to the sterile CD production. It’s not that it’s bad kit, I have dozens of recorded CD I used to store music and they sound great, but a soulless White Album & Magical Mystery Tour on CD ruined it for me :frowning:

They record samples which are then played back - And do not accurately reflect the recorded source. Audio cassettes, whilst have appalling acoustics, and dropped off after a certain Hz (to my knowlegde) were still an okay, listenable media.

Many of my tapes bought from charity shops (I bought some Sony cassettes from 1977 :slight_smile: ) are becoming so faded they are fading horribly, the sound is becoming quieter etc… Just the average result of a cassette. For simple stuff like voice however, mixed correctly using high end gear, will sound much, much better than anything a CD can reproduce.

Tapes are re-recordable as well ;)[/QUOTE]

1977 :eek: i was born in 1978 so the oldest cassette that i have is from the mid 80’s and yes the sound is a little bad, but you can put it an listen to music.
I am a fan of the vinyl and cassettes, there is something magical about them, especially vinyl.
Yes, the sound might not be as good as the first time, but i am very happy to have stuff that i used when i was a child working even now, also you can be happy that this tape is still working after 34 years :cool:.

In the end i guess that as you grow old you appreciate some things more. I happen to like the good old analogue stuff, with all their faults. I have a friend that has more than 200 VHS tapes and 500 dvd’s and i never saw him saying anything when a dvd went unreadable, but i got two hours of “mourning” when a VHS tape fall the table and went to the trash can even though the magnetic tape was saved.


#9

I only went true true digital a couple of months ago when i decided to attach a 2TB drive to my NAS and put all media on that thing. The most important stuff is safe because of an automatic backup job on an old 500GB drive. And i use a 750GB external drive to backup them again.

Before that i used to burn a lot of dvd’s. Before that CD-Roms. Before that taping VHS. Before that taping casettes. All kinds of storage suck, because you never get it perfectly right. These days i use old cd spindles to store the collections. It’s the most space saving solution. But nothing (cheap) beats a 2TB disk. :slight_smile:

These days i only burn and collect to disc only if i really need to.


#10

The reason why everyone raves about vinyl is not necessarily because of the clarity of sound, but rather the “truer” honesty of the format. I won’t try patronise any sound buffs by saying that vinyl sounds better because it is truer and captures all of the information - Rather than being clipped by CD as samples - Rather, the lack of bass is what gets to me and I don’t like the sterile-ness of CD’s, and plus, I can handle a odd drop out, but not a unreadable skip from a CD! :doh:

DVDs and CD are becoming much more stable than they were 10 years ago, but truth be told, will anyone still be using optical disc formats in ten years? Probably not, I actually think, at the moment, SSD drives will compete in price against the bog-standard hard drive :flower:

Anyway, the market is flooded with discs manufacturers all entering the rat race, so to speak, which drive disc prices right down. Disc spindles are so cheap now, as indeed are hard drives, that keeping to cassettes doesn’t make economical sense because they degrade, sound quality, etc, and they are quite expensive compared to the mighty disc.

Regardless, I will still use cassettes to record coverage from radio since I don’t have a standalone CD recorder. Cassettes, whilst perhaps not faithfully, have always done the job for me, so I want to rip them onto my computer and keep the masters - No point throwing out or erasing masters when they are quite small anyway :slight_smile:

That said though, I prefer burning to quality Maxell RitekF1 dye discs for reliable burning, which I expect to last for some time, several copies, dirt cheap. Win :wink:


#11

Thanks for the advise guys I will donate them to someone ,I’m really trying to cut back on the junk I have, I also have 3500 music cds that I’m putting on a NAS storage unit.with 3500 cds it takes up a lot of room.A lot of those vhs are so old there falling a part and are in bad shape quality wise.


#12

No worries Marloyd :flower: were just glad we could help :slight_smile:

Seriously though I would highly recommend dubbing those VHS tapes that you might want to keep… Just toss away the naff tapes though :doh:


#13

When did I go digital…hmmm.

Got my first CD player (standalone) in 1988, for Christmas when I was 13. Mum got it second-hand from a neighbour for £80. I had inherited a Sharp hi-fi system when my mum upgraded our main one, so it plugged into that.

I was well away, although I only had a few CDs at the time! Made by Teleton (who? LOL), that CD player came with me when I moved into my first place at 16. Sadly when I tried to get it repaired a few years later, the parts were no longer available and it had to be junked :sad:

As for DVD…I got my first player (Philips) and drive (LiteOn) in 2005, after a bit of cajoling from my boyfriend at the time.

I must say, being very short on space for all my junk as it is, I prefer optical media from a space-saving point of view.

The only video tapes I kept, and still have today, are my Red Dwarf series 1-6, Smeg Outs and Smeg Ups tapes, and a recording I made of the BBC’s Red Dwarf night in 1997. I don’t have the room to keep hold of anything else!

My mum, though, has tons of VHS tapes. I gave her my VCR when I got DVD, and she still has it now. :slight_smile:


#14

Oh wow, that’s some stuff Arachne - If today’s money terms, I think that would equal about £150 now if you wanted to buy that CD Player :eek:

Yes, digital media is great in the sense they are so space saving and many audio cassettes can be bunged onto one CD-R or DVD-R for, pfft, what, 15p at most?

About cassettes though the only cassettes I do have are master recordings from the radio as I don’t have a CD recorder. and since cassettes are dead cheap now anyway, it doesn’t make sense to throw out the cassettes.

Infact, many of my cassettes have been ripped (or equally got elsewhere) onto my drive and then, if the cassette is well worn like some of my TDK cassettes that my NANNAN recorded during the seventies ( :eek: Thankfully it is just music and nothing that can’t be replaced anyway they will be chucked or wrote over for my radio :slight_smile:


#15

Oh, and also, I too made the transition to DVD from VHS. Whereas cassettes are on a lifeline support from radio broadcasts, VHS have no usage in my life anymore as everything essential has been backed up to DVD :slight_smile:


#16

Glad to see you are going to donate them to some charity. Even the “bad” ones .
If a charity can only gets 5 cents for the “bad” ones. It all adds up. If someone pays that they must want it for some reason.
Just don’t buy this piece of junk to do it: Roxio Easy VHS to DVD .
I’ve seen this one recommended here but I haven’t tried it myself.
http://www.adstechnologies.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=1


#17

@Cholla - I could never understand why fools buy converting software when many DVD users just want to watch to films. The majority of them don’t care so much for editing, or importing to computers, and instead are bothered just about bunging their footage onto a DVD.

If people want to buy them by all means do so, but if all you want to do is watch the DVD without any interest in editing, or any jazz like that, just buy a second hand DVD recorder - Cash Converters in my local area were doing a high quality Phillips unit for £25.


#18

@ Chad_Bronson ,
I already have 4 standalone DVD recorders . As well as 3 DVD drives for the computer.
Two are combo DVD/VCR units .
The problem with just " bunging their footage onto a DVD " is if this is attempted with a commercial movie VHS tape you run into Macrovision . Even the one I posted & haven’t tried is reported to sometimes remove the Macrovision .The best tool for removing I have found for this is a GREX but it still needs a capture device to go to the computer. With a little tricky cable arrangement it can be used on the single combo unit but I usually go from one unit to another for this.
If you are just working with home recorded movies to VHS then the combo units work OK. You will still get a better quality picture & burn when done with a DVD drive from a computer.
That being said quality is in the eye of the beholder . If you are satisfied with the quality then no one else should have a problem with it . Unless you are tying the in a chair & making them watch it. :wink: :bigsmile:


#19

I do apologise if my last message seemed a little aggressive :o

Yeah that’s fair enough, but many of my recordings I do want to backup are films and shows I recorded from the TV or home movies - Meaning for me there is no macrovision protection. :iagree:


#20

In 2000 I had racks of VHS tapes now nearly all the titles are in DVD or have been converted VHS to DVD. I can’t even give away the VHS tapes now.