What?

vbimport

#1

Seen on an A/V forum, this gave me a really good laugh. I’m sure the Guy didn’t realise what he said.

"The picture on the 4K TV is so good, it’s unreal" :confused:


#2

Not to be too daft, but am I missing something?


#3

[QUOTE=Albert;2761330]Not to be too daft, but am I missing something?[/QUOTE]
Not a realist?


#4

In my neck of the woods. Unreal is a slang term used as.
Something is so good, that it’s hard to believe its real, but it is real.


#5

[QUOTE=Dee;2761336]In my neck of the woods. Unreal is a slang term used as.
Something is so good, that it’s hard to believe its real, but it is real.[/QUOTE]

Ditto. It is indeed used to indicate shock that something really happened or really exists.

For me, it’s related (distantly) to calling something “surreal”.

[QUOTE=Stereodude;2761334]Not a realist?[/QUOTE]

Not in the strictest sense of the word. :wink:


#6

Of course I have heard the term “unreal” to describe a super car, building, or anything that needs a superlative, but, a 4K TV is doing it’s best to be as [B]real[/B] as technically possible at the moment. To use the superlative “unreal” just struck me as ironically funny!
Our senses of humour must differ quite a lot. :smiley:


#7

[QUOTE=voxsmart;2761376]Of course I have heard the term “unreal” to describe a super car, building, or anything that needs a superlative, but, a 4K TV is doing it’s best to be as [B]real[/B] as technically possible at the moment. To use the superlative “unreal” just struck me as ironically funny!
Our senses of humour must differ quite a lot. :D[/QUOTE]

Don’t worry, you’re not the only one that picked up on that. :slight_smile:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#8

We have that same silly speech terms here, sometime people say some is " [B]BAD[/B]" when its actually very [B]GOOD[/B]. As in That Ferrari is a BAD ass car, but the guy actually means its a great car , I am too old for such silliness.:rolleyes:


#9

A super custom chopper motorcycle costing over $20,000 was being described as “sick” ?
I suppose this is what happens when superlatives are over used, mixed together (like humungus) and then new ones are invented. “Bad” has been around for a long time and I’m beginning to see what the meaning is, although it’s sill wrong. But hey, language does evolve. This can lead to great confusion. :confused:


#10

[QUOTE=voxsmart;2761388]A super custom chopper motorcycle costing over $20,000 was being described as “sick” ?
I suppose this is what happens when superlatives are over used, mixed together (like humungus) and then new ones are invented. “Bad” has been around for a long time and I’m beginning to see what the meaning is, although it’s sill wrong. But hey, language does evolve. This can lead to great confusion. :confused:[/QUOTE] So a Bad girl is actually a good girl? Like I said, I am to old to get used to this silly crap.:frowning:


#11

[QUOTE=alan1476;2761391]So a Bad girl is actually a good girl?[/QUOTE]
That depends entirely on the inflection used on bad, and what exactly you’re after. :bigsmile:


#12

[QUOTE=alan1476;2761391]So a Bad girl is actually a good girl? Like I said, I am to old to get used to this silly crap.:([/QUOTE]
Does that mean a “good” girl is actually bad? :eek:

I empathise totally with the old part of you comment. Why can’t people speak proper English. Enough of this “fully sick” rubbish.



#13

And just to add fuel to the fire, something that “blows”, “sucks”! :bigsmile:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#14

We could make a dictionary of modern idioms. (And not so modern)

“Dis vacuum cleaner sucks, I’m gonna take it to da repair shop”.

Of course, some say Gals are “hot” and some Guys are “cool”. (Or vice versa)

I’ve heard a group of girls call themselves Guys, like; “Hey Guys, were we goin’”. (This was in the UK)

“Wow, your hot rod is a real cool ride man, it’s unreal!”

Now isn’t that confusing. Hot and cold running car?

The other thing that now gets used a lot is the word “literally” as an emphasis on a statement. The funny part is it’s now OK to use this even if it’s not actually literal. Now in the dictionary along with it’s real and original meaning.

Language fascinates me, the amount words that have been debased over the centuries is phenomenal, one of my favourites is “Decimated” Most think it means totally destroyed, it actually means 10% destruction. Deci as in 10.


#15

[QUOTE=voxsmart;2761469]We could make a dictionary of modern idioms. (And not so modern)

“Dis vacuum cleaner sucks, I’m gonna take it to da repair shop”.

Of course, some say Gals are “hot” and some Guys are “cool”. (Or vice versa)

I’ve heard a group of girls call themselves Guys, like; “Hey Guys, were we goin’”. (This was in the UK)

“Wow, your hot rod is a real cool ride man, it’s unreal!”

Now isn’t that confusing. Hot and cold running car?

The other thing that now gets used a lot is the word “literally” as an emphasis on a statement. The funny part is it’s now OK to use this even if it’s not actually literal. Now in the dictionary along with it’s real and original meaning.

Language fascinates me, the amount words that have been debased over the centuries is phenomenal, one of my favourites is “Decimated” Most think it means totally destroyed, it actually means 10% destruction. Deci as in 10.[/QUOTE]
Two guys were standing in linr st the Apple Store and said the new phones were " bitching" and he was getting one today. Puzzled.:wink:


#16

[QUOTE=voxsmart;2761469]We could make a dictionary of modern idioms. (And not so modern)

“Dis vacuum cleaner sucks, I’m gonna take it to da repair shop”.

Of course, some say Gals are “hot” and some Guys are “cool”. (Or vice versa)

I’ve heard a group of girls call themselves Guys, like; “Hey Guys, were we goin’”. (This was in the UK)

“Wow, your hot rod is a real cool ride man, it’s unreal!”

Now isn’t that confusing. Hot and cold running car?

The other thing that now gets used a lot is the word “literally” as an emphasis on a statement. The funny part is it’s now OK to use this even if it’s not actually literal. Now in the dictionary along with it’s real and original meaning.

Language fascinates me, the amount words that have been debased over the centuries is phenomenal, one of my favourites is “Decimated” Most think it means totally destroyed, it actually means 10% destruction. Deci as in 10.[/QUOTE]
Two guys were standing in line at the Apple Store and said the new phones were " bitching" and he was getting one today. Puzzled.:wink: I’m just too old.


#17

Most helpful critical review!? Something I saw on one of Amazon’s user reviews: :wink:



#18

[QUOTE=Seán;2762950]Most helpful critical review!? Something I saw on one of Amazon’s user reviews: :wink:

[/QUOTE]

TBH I quite often check out the bad reviews to see if they’re consistent as if a lot of people complain about the same problem then you know there’s something wrong.

Plus you also get to read the amusing complaints from lunatics. :bigsmile:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#19

It’s similar with me, I quite often check the 1 to 3 star reviews as the majority of the 4 and 5 star reviews are from users who received the product free of charge to review.

I thought that one was rather odd with Amazon saying it’s the most helpful critical review with it clearly showing that “0 of 7 people” found it helpful. :wink:


#20

I thought I would bump the thread with some ‘From a non-native point of view’ :bigsmile:

Even we have come to understand most but the most current of these opposite meanings of words due to the expressions being used on the net and in movies.

Thinking about it, I could probably be considered rude in a day to day conversation by using an expression not suitable for the situation just because the expression was accepted as a common way of describing something. In such a case, I would be to blame for what the net or a movie did teach me (in some situations I can imagine it could be critical).

I try to keep my language on the level and not use expressions where I am not absolutely sure of the meaning and where it is acceptable to use it, still not being native English speaking, I could easily fail.

It is rather funny with expressions like even badass. In my mind that would initially, if I did not know, translate to some illness like hemorrhoids :bigsmile: and if I (without reading this thread) heard girls saying ‘come on guys’ I could easily think, ah transvestites even though they would probably not use the word ‘guys’.
Then the expression ‘bad ride’ - NO! I rather have a comfortable ride if any :slight_smile:

We do use such opposite words here as well, and a ‘shit good icecream’ (dritt-god is) is not an unusual expression. It is a good indication of what voxsmart mentions, the overuse of ordinary superlatives to emphasize on the fact that it was indeed a very good icecream by using a word of the opposite meaning. The word shit (in Norwegian: dritt) is used approximately as you use the word fuck. I mean, an expression like ‘fucking good’ does not do anything but describe what comes before or after the expression to give weight and could just as well be exchanged for ‘very good’

I know that languages constantly evolves and that the meaning of words changes over time. However, if I try to follow the lines, we will sooner or later hit the day when no means yes.


trivia:

The direct translation of Norwegian into English may fail badly… Like when we order a ‘bloody beef’ in a restaurant (Norwegian ‘blodig’=‘bloody’ but means raw) - we might as well order some fucking potatoes to go with it (but the not so globe-trotting Norwegian would not know) :bigsmile:


Where my language easily fails is with words of politeness like ‘please’ that English speaking countries seem to apply ever so often without meaning it. Norwegian does not usually apply such words to a sentence unless there is a true meaning to it. French ladies married to Norwegian men were interviewed years back, and they all said that the men did not give compliments easily… I can go with that because they said that when they got a compliment, it was both honest and heartfelt and they could be damn certain the men did mean it.

Then again, Norwegians are not particularly good at receiving compliments either and probably start to argue that it was not that good or that anyone could have done that … unless they have done something truly outstanding. I think we have something to learn from you in both these respects as we may seem a tad like our climate - cold (we are not)