What speed should you burn BD-R at?

vbimport

#1

I am new to BD-R burning. I always burn DVDs at the lowest speed.

I’ve burned a few BD-R and they seem to be ok. I set IMGBURN to 1x (slowest available). It burns the BD-R at 2X since that is the lowest supported by the media. Is it better to burn at the lowest speed possible or the highest rated speed?

The BD-R media I have is RiData 4X BDR-254-RDCB15.

Also, I messed up one of these BD-Rs. I set IMGBURN to burn the disc, and I opened a program at the same time, and IMGBURN hung at 0%. I tried again, and IMGBURN said the disc was not empty and would not burn to it even though it still had 23.5 or so GB of free space. Is there any way to burn this disc or is it a coaster?


#2

[QUOTE=9020V;2487210]I am new to BD-R burning. I always burn DVDs at the lowest speed.

I’ve burned a few BD-R and they seem to be ok. I set IMGBURN to 1x (slowest available). It burns the BD-R at 2X since that is the lowest supported by the media. Is it better to burn at the lowest speed possible or the highest rated speed?

The BD-R media I have is RiData 4X BDR-254-RDCB15.

Also, I messed up one of these BD-Rs. I set IMGBURN to burn the disc, and I opened a program at the same time, and IMGBURN hung at 0%. I tried again, and IMGBURN said the disc was not empty and would not burn to it even though it still had 23.5 or so GB of free space. Is there any way to burn this disc or is it a coaster?[/QUOTE]

Actually, you’ve been “ruining” your DVDs by burning at an excessively slow speed for your particular burner/DVD media combination. You see, modern 16x-rated DVD media does not respond well to low-speed burns from a high-speed burner: Your slow-speed burns are much more likely to develop tons of errors and high jitter than those same discs burned at 4x speed. Burning those same discs at 8x instead of 4x will likely produce better results still. Generally speaking, with 16x-rated DVD media try to keep your set burn speed between 6x and 12x for best results.

Same thing with BD-R discs: Generally speaking, the discs should be burnt at or slightly below their rated speed (or slightly below the maximum speed supported by your burner/media combination, if your particular burner can burn faster than the media brand’s rated maximum).

As for your problem disc, it’s a coaster. In fact, we’ve been warning you against buying RiData or any other RiTEK-manufactured BD-Rs due to degradation issues with their 2x (and to a lesser extent 4x) media. Their BD department has not learned from the mistakes they had a few years ago with their G04 and G05 “8x-rated” DVD-R media, both of which have also suffered degradation issues.


#3

Thanks, this is the information I was looking for. I will burn at 4X from now on.

Do you know why low-speed burns are problematic (i.e., what the actual mechanism is that causes problems)? The reason that I’m confused is that I always verify after burning, and it’s almost never a problem. When I started burning DVDs, I always burnt at the rated speed, and they disc would fail verification. Burning at the lowest speed always passed verification. I assuming it matters how the data is physically present on the disc in regards to the longevity of the burn.

Regarding the Ritek discs, I don’t think there is nearly enough evidence to stop using their discs just yet. I never once had a problem with their DVDs (single or dual layer), and all my burns over the past two years still read fine.


#4

At the moment, the Ritek BD disks are virtually the only ones with reports of degradation of data. That in itself should give you pause in considering using them.

Like the G05 disks, this is not a universal problem, some still seem to be good. But there are very few of us doing user tests for degradation of media in Blu ray, and there hasn’t been enough time to ascertain their longevity.


#5

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2487516]At the moment, the Ritek BD disks are virtually the only ones with reports of degradation of data. That in itself should give you pause in considering using them.

Like the G05 disks, this is not a universal problem, some still seem to be good. But there are very few of us doing user tests for degradation of media in Blu ray, and there hasn’t been enough time to ascertain their longevity.[/QUOTE]

tried to explain that to him/her but doesn’t want to lisen.

out of all BD-R brands, Ritek made disc are the only one with huge issues.


#6

I burn all my discs at the max speed supported never had a problem


#7

[QUOTE=MrPete1985;2487909]I burn all my discs at the max speed supported never had a problem[/QUOTE]

take a look here to compare

the disc burned at max speed are still fully functional, but i would not recommend burning them at max


#8

[QUOTE=9020V;2487434]Do you know why low-speed burns are problematic (i.e., what the actual mechanism is that causes problems)? The reason that I’m confused is that I always verify after burning, and it’s almost never a problem. When I started burning DVDs, I always burnt at the rated speed, and they disc would fail verification. Burning at the lowest speed always passed verification. I assuming it matters how the data is physically present on the disc in regards to the longevity of the burn.[/QUOTE]

This is actually due to the electrical characteristics of modern write lasers in very recent DVD burners. The lasers in newer DVD burners do not have the correct write strategy for very low-speed burns when a very-high-speed-rated disc ID is used; they assume that you won’t be using burn speeds slower than 4x (this is the so-called “4x” write strategy). You should also check the supported write speeds for your particular burner/media combination: Many modern burners do not support any write speeds lower than 8x on 12x- or 16x-rated media even though you can physically set 1x on ImgBurn due to the firmware in the burner. (In other words, always check the supported speeds for your MID/burner combination (in ImgBurn, the supported speeds are in parentheses next to the media’s MID code); using a speed setting that’s not supported by the drive’s firmware may lead to problems with your burns.)

As for “better” burns at the lowest possible speed, this might have been true when DVD burners wrote no faster than 2.4x or 4x and the media in existence were rated at write speeds no higher than 4x. But once blank DVD media and DVD burners went to 8x and higher, you had to write at around half the maximum rated speed (for example, 8x on 16x-rated DVD media with a 16x or faster burner) in order to minimize any problems.

As for your next burns on your RiData 4x BD-R, I would use a 2x or 2.4x write speed just to be safe.


#9

Thanks, as an engineer I value a technical explanation.

When I set IMGBurn to burn at 1X, it never drops below 2X, so I’m assuming IMGBurn forces the burn at the minimum rated speed for the media even if you select it lower than that.

Last night, I tried a burn on a 4X Ridata BD-R at 4X (img burn says supported speeds are 2x, 4x, 6x, and 8x). The burn started off at 4X, but when I looked back a few minutes later, it was burning at 2X and stayed that way the rest of the burn. Does this mean IMGBurn was having difficulty burning at 4X and went lower automatically? I verified the disc after burning and all green.

Is it a good rule of thumb to always burn at half the max rated speed?


#10

[QUOTE=9020V;2488108]When I set IMGBurn to burn at 1X, it never drops below 2X, so I’m assuming IMGBurn forces the burn at the minimum rated speed for the media even if you select it lower than that.[/QUOTE] No, it’s the firmware in the drive that enforces the burn speed - ImgBurn and any other burning program can only request a certain burn speed.


#11

[QUOTE=9020V;2488108]

Last night, I tried a burn on a 4X Ridata BD-R at 4X (img burn says supported speeds are 2x, 4x, 6x, and 8x). The burn started off at 4X, but when I looked back a few minutes later, it was burning at 2X and stayed that way the rest of the burn. [B]Does this mean IMGBurn was having difficulty burning at 4X [/B]and went lower automatically? I verified the disc after burning and all green.[/QUOTE]

no, that means drive was having difficulty writing to the media and it lowered the speed. seems your “flawless” ritek are not so flawless


#12

[QUOTE=nekrosoft13;2488157]no, that means drive was having difficulty writing to the media and it lowered the speed. seems your “flawless” ritek are not so flawless[/QUOTE]

Doesn’t matter much to me what speed it burns at. The media is cheaper, so I’m willing to wait. Verified 100% and came out all green, so I’m happy for now. I’ve got a set of Verbatim BD-R to test next and LTH Verbatim discs on order (which I am very interested to test).


#13

its not the speed that matters, the point is burn speed dropped because drive detected some sort of issue.

and “verifing” or discscan “green” is no indication of media quality.

these “wonderful” ritek disc where all green, and verified couple months ago as well.