What specs to use when scanning Cd leaf album art, concert flyers, & ticket stubs

vbimport

#1

1). I have quite a collection of concert ticket stubs, concert fliers & post cards. What resolution should I scan these at? what color space? sRGB or Adobe RGB? & what bit depth? 24 or 48?

I will be using them in slide shows on DVDs to watch on a computer & TV, & possibly print as well.

2). I am also in the process of scanning Album art, the leaflets/covers that come in the jewel cases of my commercial audio CD’s. What resolution? sRGB or Adobe RGB? & 24 or 48 bit depth?

I may print these as well.

I have 2 scanners; one a separate one, an Epson perfection 4490 photo & a built in scanner in my HP all in one inkjet printer. would the HP one work? or do I need the Epson?

I guess it comes down to what the companies use when the make CD album art & ticket stubs.

These projects of scanning will be quite an undertaking, so It would be nice to get it right to start, I dont want to go back again. Thanks for any help.


#2

[QUOTE=Sossity;2531008]1). I have quite a collection of concert ticket stubs, concert fliers & post cards. What resolution should I scan these at? what color space? sRGB or Adobe RGB? & what bit depth? 24 or 48?

I will be using them in slide shows on DVDs to watch on a computer & TV, & possibly print as well.[/QUOTE]

Besides the software it’s also the hardware that makes the differences as well so you should also invest in a good high resolution scanner of known brand name.

[QUOTE=Sossity;2531008]2). I am also in the process of scanning Album art, the leaflets/covers that come in the jewel cases of my commercial audio CD’s. What resolution? sRGB or Adobe RGB? & 24 or 48 bit depth?

I may print these as well.[/QUOTE]

This is something one shouldn’t announce as those cover/leaflets are copyright and trademark protected by their respectful companies so if you plan on producing them and marketing them you will need those companies permission and probably pay them royalties for using and printing them.

[QUOTE=Sossity;2531008]I have 2 scanners; one a separate one, an Epson perfection 4490 photo & a built in scanner in my HP all in one inkjet printer. would the HP one work? or do I need the Epson?

I guess it comes down to what the companies use when the make CD album art & ticket stubs.

These projects of scanning will be quite an undertaking, so It would be nice to get it right to start, I dont want to go back again. Thanks for any help.[/QUOTE]

I would still go with a dedicate scanner that is made solely for high resolution scanning. MIO units are con and pros and those leave out or sacrifices quality or performances to be a all in one unit.


#3

I scan just about everything at the best resolution possible. The more data that the scanner can put into a file the better.
Then copy the file to another folder & modify the copy with an image program the size you want it.
That way you have a large original to make another copy to work with any time you want it. With the size of hard drives now there is no reason not to store large image files.


#4

[QUOTE=cholla;2531041]I scan just about everything at the best resolution possible. The more data that the scanner can put into a file the better.[/QUOTE] Let’s consider your statement for a moment…
Even the cheapest scanners today offer something like 1200x1200dpi at 48 bits, and if you scan a 5x5 inch CD-cover, that will be 206 MB uncompressed image data (1200x1200x48x5x5/8/1024/1024).

If you have a better scanner, the resolution might be something like 4800x4800 dpi at 96 bit, which for the same 5x5 inch CD cover will be 6592 MB uncompressed image data!

Now consider the memory and time required for performing image processing on such an image!

In my opinion it rarely makes sense to scan anything (except slides and negatives) at more than 600 dpi. That’s still more than twice the resolution compared to the 200-250 dpi that you get in e.g. normal magazine print.


#5

And as another consideration, consider the end format. a DVD slide show is only 720 X 480 (576 PAL) and a print is good at 300 dpi.