What program is this?

I was watching tv and I saw this bar appear on the bottom of the screen. I’m guessing it’s from the local station… But I was wondering if someone knew what program this was so I can maybe use it to watch other channels… Does anyone know what program this is?

This is the Korean channel “Arirang World”. You’ll get the TV listing on the following link:

Going by the screenshot, you’re picking this channel up at 58.0°W (Intelsat 9) on the C-Band.

There are only a few other free-to-air channels on that satellite position, but if you’re curious to see what others are available, have a look at the following link:
http://www.lyngsat.com/intel9.html

C-band? Is that those big satellite dishes? And once you buy one of those big dishes you can get free satellite tv without paying for subscriptions? So then that bar probably wasn’t a program I could download from anywhere? Cause the channel KEMS is the one I watch through my bunny ears antenna and I pick up with my digital to analog receiver box. So then if I got a big c-band dish I could cut out the middle man and watch arirang tv without them, right? Cause I’m not korean but I like arirang and mbc networks but KEMS only plays them a few hours at a time so it’d be nice if I could get those 24 hours a day always. Please reply with as much info as possible I’m very interested now.:iagree:

And out of that list from that link you posted how do I know which the free ones are as opposed to the non free channels?

C Band requires the use of a rather large satellite dish. :iagree:

That Arirang World channel is indeed Free to Air, which means you don’t pay for a subscription to receive it. All the channels in that light beige colour are free to air. The deeper tan colour channels are encrypted and cannot be tuned in without a suitable decoder and subscription. The “PowerVu” encrypted channels are only for re-distribution (e.g. to cable networks), which means there is no way to pick them up from satellite at all.

Before considering a C Band dish, first check if you can pick up an adequate signal in your area as this way you’ll know what size dish you need. The following link shows a coverage map. Check which EIRP ring # you’re inside and look at the table on the right:
http://www.lyngsat-maps.com/maps/intel9_am.html

The bigger the dish, the better the signal gain. It’s also worth checking which other satellite points you may be interested in. A fixed-point satellite dish will pick up channels from a single satellite location, which is ideal if you’re only interested in picking up channels from this satellite (i.e. 58.0°W). A polar mount satellite dish with an actuator (motor) and a suitable satellite receiver will pick up all the satellites across the sky you have line of sight with, where those satellite channels (transponders) provide strong enough coverage in your area for your size of dish. Most C Band channels have a frequency range of 3.6GHz to 4.2GHz, which can only be picked up with a C Band LNB. KU-Band channels have a frequency range of 10.7GHz to 12.75GHz and can only be picked up by a full range KU-Band LNB.

For other satellites, have a look at the satellites from ~40°W to ~127°W (assuming you live in the US). Any channels that are a light beige colour are free-to-air and do not require a subscription to view. To check if that satellite transponder provides sufficient signal in your area, click on the beam link to the right of the channel (2nd column from the right) and you’ll see the coverage map. Click the channel name (if clickable) to view the channel’s website. If the website is in English, then the channel will likely be also:

http://www.lyngsat.com/atlantic.html
http://www.lyngsat.com/america.html

Make sure you have clear sight of the sky, especially if you are interested in a motorised satellite dish. For a very large dish, you’ll also need plenty of space where you plan installing it. Of course, another thing to watch out for is whether there is any restriction on installing such a large dish in your area. For example, in the UK, planning permission is required to install any dish over 90cm (3 feet) in diameter.

The following gives an idea of what a 5 foot dish (~1.6m) size looks like next to me (I’m just over 6 foot tall):

They are nicknamed “Big Ugly Dish” for a reason. :wink:

Generally a C Band dish is made of mesh to reduce costs and weight. For KU band, a solid dish provides better gain. If you plan on picking up KU band reception also, you’ll need a suitable feed-horn for the dish capable of taking both KU band and C band LNBs as well as a receiver with inputs for both.

Finally, those big dishes are not cheap to purchase either and will take a bit of time to set up, especially for a motorised dish. A heavy duty ground mount is also critical, as large dishes catch a lot of wind.

As I only have experience with KU band reception, I would strongly recommend speaking to someone experienced with setting up C band dishes and to also find out what equipment you’ll need and where would be the best place to get it.

You’ll likely need the following (from my reading around for C Band-only reception):

[ul]
[li]Suitable size C Band satellite dish (with polar mount if you want it motorised)[/li][li]For motorised dish: A suitable size actuator & sensor[/li][li]C-band LNB (a few come complete with feed horn to reduce cost)[/li][li]Feed horn (for C Band LNB on its own)[/li][li]C-band satellite receiver (some receivers are intended for fixed-point only reception).[/li][li]suitable length of satellite grade coaxial cable and F connectors for each end.[/li][/ul]

This online store will give an idea of pricing. As I don’t live in the US, I’m unable to recommend any particular shop.

Thanks for the info. I live in california, USA for I guess www.lyngsat-maps.com/maps/intel9_am.html says I’m either 40 or 41 which is a good thing, being closer in the red? And also looking at www.lyngsat.com/intel9.html means I’d also be able to get NHK, a japanese channel for free too!:cool: So for the most part yeah, I’d probably only need the satillite in one position but I may get greedy later and want to be able to see what else outer space has available. :bigsmile: As for weather, here in california we’re still having some winter behavior so I may wait for spring before I make a serious shopping list but after your first reply I was web surfing and came across skyvision.com, do you know anything about them? Are they good dealers? And from the picture, I’m guessing what your holding is the satellites remote? Once you tell the satellite where to look, can you just click a button to change it’s aim like changing channels? Well thanks again for the info because now I’m very excited about the free channels the rest of the world has to offer! :slight_smile:

After a quick look at the map, one drawback with this satellite position is that it is very close to the horizon from your area, which means you need a clear line of sight to the horizon just south of east, i.e. no buildings or trees near your house or hill blocking that direction.

To get the direction the satellite will point at, there is a utility called SMWLink (which can be obtained here) which calculates the satellite angle and direction based on your Latitude and Longitude and the satellite position (58°W). For coordinates of 120°W and 40°N (as a rough estimate of your area), the dish would need to point at 112° Azimuth (12° south of East), with a dish elevation of 9° (from horizontal).

I haven’t heard of Skyvision before, but after a quick look at their website, they do have a nice FAQ section and selection of equipment (e.g. this dedicated C band page). As the satellite will need to point at such a low angle, I would recommend checking with them before deciding on a dish to make sure its mount can go down to that angle. Generally most will go right down to about horizontal.

For the dish size, it looks like you’ll be fine with a 4 foot (1.2m) fixed dish, especially if you would like to keep costs down. If you are handy with DIY, you can try setting up the mount and dish yourself, which will also help cut cost and pass the time during a quiet day. :slight_smile: A satellite dish is another name for a radio telescope. Like aligning a telescope at a planet, it will take a while to find the satellite, as one degree off vertical/horizontal is the difference between the ideal alignment and no signal.

If the dish mount has an elevation chart, this will make alignment easier as you just need to set the elevation (i.e. ~9° for this satellite), set the LNB angle (36° clockwise for this satellite), select the correct satellite on the TV/receiver and swing around the dish until the signal comes in and finally adjust the vertical angle until you have the strongest signal.

In the above picture, I was holding a satellite meter. This was my previous fixed point dish, but has been warped by the recent storms. I’m not sure if the regular KU band meter works on the C Band, but they generally show whether the signal is getting stronger or weaker as the dish is moved. The knob adjusts the meter’s sensitivity, which allows the needle to be moved back to the center for further dish adjustment.

I would recommend a warm clear day before setting up the dish, especially if you plan doing so yourself.

With a motorised satellite, the receiver moves the dish to the required satellite. Even if you get a fixed satellite dish & receiver, you can still reposition the dish to another point in the future. :wink:

One other satellite worth checking which carries Arirang World is Galaxy 19 at 97.0°W:
http://www.lyngsat.com/galaxy19.html

The satellite is much higher in the Sky from your location, which makes this a better option if you don’t have a clear line of sight near the horizon for 58.0°W. It’s on the KU band and can be picked up with a regular 80cm offset dish in California.

However, NHK World and some of the other free broadcasts on 58.0°W only broadcast to the US from that satellite.

I turned in NHK World on my satellite receiver here (it broadcasts to Europe FTA on Astra 19.2°E) and I can confirm the channel is English, at least the programme that was on when I checked a moment ago. :wink:

Well I went to http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/mtr/ and found out that my coordinates are 37.27°N 121.85°W (Elev. 161 ft) so if I’m doing it right this is what (58°W) looks like but intelsat 8 at 166.0°E looks like this. But on intelsat 8 MBC come encrypted but then looks clear on ku band Koreasat 5 at 113.0°E. So I don’t really know the difference between ku and c band but the possibilities are very intriguing. And Europes Intelsat 10 at 68.5°E seems to look like and comes with 81 clear digital channels. But that sucks that nhk world is all english but non the less I’d still like to check it out. Umm, what makes you think I’d be okay with a smaller dish? Cause any money I save on a dish just means more money to spend on a better receiver. :smiley: And yeah I am pretty tech savvy with diy, but this satellite stuff is new territory for me. So it’s completely foreign to me but I’ll still try myself first because I’m very patient.

Oops, I forgot to mention that the Longitude needs to be entered as a negative number for west, i.e. -121 for 121°W:

Unfortunately, pretty much all Eastern satellites (i.e. from ~170°E to 0°E and 0°W to ~50°W) are out of the range from your area, so I would suggest looking at satellites from that 58°W satellite to 180°W. For example, 68.5°E is located over Japan and would give a satellite direction as follows: :doh:

KU band is commonly used by the encrypted commercial services such as DirecTV and Dish Network and as KU typically has a much stronger signal, it can be picked up with very small satellite dishes. The KU band channels range from 10.7GHz to 12.750GHz (10700MHz to 12750MHz) :wink:

So the stronger the signal means strong enough for smaller sat’s to pick up and weaker signals, being weaker takes alot to receive them like a beefy huge satellite dish? Well I’ll probably make a quick run through http://www.lyngsat.com with the correct coordinates later to figure out between ku and c band who’s got the more free channels. :slight_smile: I like to prepare because I don’t like to have regrets. So I feel like I almost got enough info to jump in the satellite world. :iagree:

ArirangTV is receiveable via Hotbird 13°East since years (FTA) in europe, asia…
That means you dont need C-band for this.

[QUOTE=oneguy;2212840]So the stronger the signal means strong enough for smaller sat’s to pick up and weaker signals, being weaker takes alot to receive them like a beefy huge satellite dish?[/QUOTE]
That’s correct :iagree:

Generally most C Band services require a large dish as they are intended to cover as wide footprint as possible. They usually require dishes starting from 4 feet (1.2m) for the strongest part of the footprint. For example, that satellite we discussed above (58°W) should be fine on a 4 foot dish in your area.

If you are completely outside a satellite footprint, there is generally no way of picking up the satellite without using an enormous dish (i.e. over 15 feet) to pick up what little signal falls out of the main footprint. An example of such a satellite would be 65.0°W, where the footprint covers South America only.

Unfortunately, the only KU band satellite that carries even a fair number of Free to Air channels in your area is Galaxy 19 at 97.0°W. The rest of the KU band satellites with footprints over North America mainly carry encrypted channels, such as those operated by The Dish and DirecTV Pay TV providers. Their satellites have such strong transponders that they can be picked up with their proprietary miniture dishes.

To start off with, I would recommend having a look at all the satellites in the range of 58°W to 139°W and checking out which channels (transponders) have the strongest footprints over your coordinates. From a quick look at some random satellites over that range, it looks like you’re in the idea spot to pick up most with a 4 foot (1.2m) C band dish, so if you decide to move the dish away from 58°W later on, you shouldn’t have to worry about the dish being too small to pick up a different satellite. :wink: The rest have their footprints over South America, in which case you wouldn’t pick them up anyway.

If you’re thinking of switching to a motorised system later on (where the dish moves itself from one satellite to the next), I would recommend mentioning this to the shop, to make sure the dish you get can have its mount changed to a polar mount (which can take a motor/actuator) later on. For the digital satellite receiver, you can start off with a simple FTA receiver (which typically costs ~$50) and later upgrade to a more advanced receiver which can drive a motorised dish.

[QUOTE=oneguy;2211756]Thanks for the info. I live in california, USA for I guess www.lyngsat-maps.com/maps/intel9_am.html says I’m either 40 or 41 which is a good thing, being closer in the red? And also looking at www.lyngsat.com/intel9.html means I’d also be able to get NHK, a japanese channel for free too!:cool: So for the most part yeah, I’d probably only need the satillite in one position but I may get greedy later and want to be able to see what else outer space has available. :bigsmile: As for weather, here in california we’re still having some winter behavior so I may wait for spring before I make a serious shopping list but after your first reply I was web surfing and came across skyvision.com, do you know anything about them? Are they good dealers? And from the picture, I’m guessing what your holding is the satellites remote? Once you tell the satellite where to look, can you just click a button to change it’s aim like changing channels? Well thanks again for the info because now I’m very excited about the free channels the rest of the world has to offer! :)[/QUOTE]

I also live in California and I’m trying to find korean programming. I have a big ugly dish (bud) that I haven’t fired up in quite a while. Could you tell me what receiver your using to get that channel. Reading the posts it states it’s at 58.0W, but I didn’t think my dish was able to see that far. Anyway, any pointers would surely be appreciated. FYI my current bud has a dual c/ku band feedhorn and its just a gi receiver. If I need a fta receiver could you recommend one. Thanks:bow:

58W
C-band
3880 H
MPEG-2 27690 3/4

http://www.flysat.com/tv-kr.php

[QUOTE=RandallFlagg;2236126]FYI my current bud has a dual c/ku band feedhorn and its just a gi receiver. If I need a fta receiver could you recommend one.[/QUOTE]

Welcome aboard to CD Freaks :slight_smile:

Is your receiver a digital (DVB) receiver? If it is, you should be able to pick up the C-band digital channels on 58°W, assuming there are no trees or hills blocking the view of the sky in that direction. Otherwise if it’s an analogue receiver, you’ll need to get a FTA DVB receiver to tune in channels on this satellite.

To make it easier to tune in the channels on a satellite, I would recommend getting a receiver that features “blind search”. With this feature, the receiver will scan for every single transponder the dish can pick up on the satellite it’s pointing at. A regular receiver just scans a range of known transponders, which means that new transponders usually have to be manually scanned.

The Foretec Star receiver on ths store is an example which can pick up both C-band and Ku-band and carry out a blind scan. You’ll need a DiSEqC switch to connect both LNBs to this receiver.

Thank you for your reply. I was guessing I needed another receiver. The old analog gi isn’t good for much anymore. I’ve been reading about fta and got a good diagram on how to hook it up. Seems I need the DiSEqC switch and a couple of 2-way high frequency splitters. I just started reading about blind scan a couple of nights ago and guessed I should try to find one with that. Seems anything that can make the learning curve less steep is a good thing. Thanks for the link, it should give me a good place to start.:clap::clap::clap:

If you go with the multi-receiver setup using splitters, only one receiver can provide the DC power to the LNBs, since the LNBs uses the supplied voltage (14 or 18 volts) to determine whether to pick up vertical or horizontal signals.

For the splitters, I would suggest getting one with all-ports DC pass (e.g. the PV23-302 Perfect Vision). This way one receiver does not need to be the master receiver to control the LNB to choose the horizontal/vertical upper/lower band for the other receiver.