What parts of a HDD are dependent on the FW?

vbimport

#1

Hi, I have a dead HDD, by dead I mean the spindle motor has reached it’s final resting place. Once before in a similar situation, many moons ago, I swapped the platers from a dead drive into a new drive with the same model number and the same firmware, read the data, and it was good. I had hoped to do the same with this current dead drive. But I’m having a hard time finding a suitable host drive to receive the platers.

Long story short, what parts are related to the firmware?

Could I put the platers from my drive with FW: 3.04 in to the same model with FW: 3.96?

Does the FW change how data is written/read on the platter?

What is the relationship between the heads and the PCB, compatibly wise with different FW?

Ect…

Any Ideas?


#2

Not even one comment… I guess nobody knows.:sad:


#3

[QUOTE=NitroxDM;2071505]

Could I put the platers from my drive with FW: 3.04 in to the same model with FW: 3.96?
[/QUOTE]
Not sure about the firmware part but it would be almost impossible to change platters


#4

Oh… Impossible, why would you say that?


#5

Hard drive recovery is performed in a “completely clean room”. One single spec of dust or finger print will render the platter unusable and probably destroy the read/write head in the new drive. Firmware is also stored in some flash memory or EEROM in the drives electronics anyway, not on the platter.
If you have already opened the faulty drive, it’s probably already past the point where it can be recovered.


#6

rrrr… There is two likely issues here 1) I was somehow unclear in my original post 2) the user base of this forum simply doesn’t know the answer to my query. So here is my question again in a different form.

Can I put the platters from HDD 1 running FW(Firmware) 3.04 into HDD 2 running FW 3.05?

I’m asking about the Firmware, not about clean rooms, or how to remove the platers, or how to manipulate the heads, or anything else. I just want to know if the drive with FW 3.05 will read data off the platters from the drive with FW3.04.

I don’t mean to be rude or anything but I have fought the “You can’t do that battle” before, it just gets old. That is people telling you that you can’t do that, especially when it is something you have done before.


#7

[QUOTE=NitroxDM;2082451]2) the user base of this forum simply doesn’t know the answer to my query. [/QUOTE]3) Perhaps no one on this forum is silly enough to suggest that you should attempt swaping platters from one drive to another. :wink:


#8

You can recover data from a dead drive if the printed circuit has been damaged or is broke in some way.
However if the spindle or head motor is toast then the only way is with a data recovery service.
If the motors are alright and it is the printed circuit board that is the problem then you can fit a replacement board. This has to be from an [B][U]identical[/U][/B] drive and known to be good.
By identical I mean manufacturer/disc size/model. The two boards should look identical.
I have used this method on a number of occasions to copy important data to a new drive before junking the defective one.
But beware it may be that the drive is faulty in some unknown way and you may toast the new board thus making two drives useless.


#9

It’s not, the PCB is fine. It is the spindle motor.

[quote=weedougie;2082804]
However if the spindle or head motor is toast then the only way is with a data recovery service.[/quote]
That is what I’m doing, well trying.

The problem I’m having now is finding another drive assembly with the same firmware. It’s not that hard to swap the platters into a new drive. Granted it’s not for the faint of hart. Let me put it this way. If you can’t take something apart (carb, watch, TV, etc) not see it for a month or two, then put it back together exactly the way it was. Trying to swap the patters is not for you.

A data recovery service is going to run into the same issue I’m having. The drive is old, and some what rare.


#10

But you forget that the recovery service use clean room techniques and have many years experience in repairs of this type.
I wish you luck doing it your self but don’t believe that you will manage it.


#11

Back to the topic of this thread. I found some info here, I thought I would share a quote.

Every hard drive contains two sets of firmware: one is stored in the board’s ROM - second in negative cylinder of the disk, called also: service cylinder, service area, maintenance cylinder or SA .
I don’t know what the negative cylinder is… yet.


#12

Why don’t you tell us the make and model number of the drive in question? It is possible to change the firmware and operation of some drives, but you’re asking us to help without any specific information.

BTW you might have got away with rebuilding a HDD a long time ago, but if this is a recently manufactured drive then there’s very little chance that a reassembled drive will work for more than a microsecond. Analogies with repairing carburettors and watches are simply not in the same order of magnitude of the tolerances involved. Have a read of this page - particularly the diagram towards the bottom - if you don’t believe us:


#13

[quote=imkidd57;2091269]Why don’t you tell us the make and model number of the drive in question? It is possible to change the firmware and operation of some drives, but you’re asking us to help without any specific information.

BTW you might have got away with rebuilding a HDD a long time ago, but if this is a recently manufactured drive then there’s very little chance that a reassembled drive will work for more than a microsecond. Analogies with repairing carburettors and watches are simply not in the same order of magnitude of the tolerances involved. Have a read of this page - particularly the diagram towards the bottom - if you don’t believe us:


What he is attemting to do is literally impossible without a host of very professional equipment. While professionals may be able to recover data from a hdd, once the platters are exposed the drive is toast.