What part does bps play in video quality?

vbimport

#1

I’m in the process of converting movie clips to a wmf format and notice there are several bps options to convert to with the higher number resulting in a larger file size.

What is the downside in video playback quality and resolution to selecting a lower number, creating a smaller file size?


#2

It may depend on the screen size that you will use to view. A lower bitrate (= bps = bits per second) may look perfectly acceptable on a pocket media player such as the PSP or iPhone/iPod, but the downside is that the same conversion would be unwatchable on a 42" TV.


#3

I figured it was tied in to that someway. It’s confusing though because the conversion says it’s still 1080p even at a lower bps. Is there any way to determine the bps of the original - which in this case is a standard VTS movie file or are all VTS files the same bps? I ask because in most cases the file size I’m converting decreases but in a few cases it actually increases.

For example a clip of Pulp Fiction converts from 424,172 mb (VTS) to 234,676 mb (HDVideo 1080p 4000 bps) where as a clip of Ferris Bueller’s Day Off converts from 502,700 mb (VTS) to 650,281 (HDVideo 1080p 4000 bps).

The end result is I want to play them back on a 50" Panasonic.


#4

Is there any way to determine the bps of the original - which in this case is a standard VTS movie file or are all VTS files the same bps

You can examine the files with a free tool called MediaInfo. I find the Tree view within MediaInfo to be the most complete and informative.