What outdated technology will you miss?

vbimport

#41

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2634784]I may have missed it, but when did paper ceased to be of usage?[/QUOTE]

Paper usage hasn’t been eliminated but hand writing has a great deal. I find my cursive hand writing to be terrible anymore because I do it so seldom. I have to consciously think about how to form the letters and connect them to form words.


#42

Who sends letters or post cards anymore


#43

People who are not computer savvy or like nostalgia. I still send letters via mail on some occasions. I also use certified mail a lot.


#44

[QUOTE=UTR;2634812]People who are not computer savvy or like nostalgia. I still send letters via mail on some occasions. I also use certified mail a lot.[/QUOTE]

Your right the post office finds enough people that still use the mail…they still delivering it. I don’t know that many people that send letters, cards maybe on holidays and special occasions But to just send a written letter,that’s rare.Just to send a letter here it’s almost 50 cents and if it’s a musical card it goes by weight.True it is some people live the uninhibited life with out a computer.I stand corrected.


#45

[QUOTE=UTR;2634796]Paper usage hasn’t been eliminated but hand writing has a great deal. I find my cursive hand writing to be terrible anymore because I do it so seldom. I have to consciously think about how to form the letters and connect them to form words.[/QUOTE]

Sometimes typed text is for the better:


#46

[QUOTE=UTR;2634796] I find my cursive hand writing to be terrible anymore because I do it so seldom. I have to consciously think about how to form the letters and connect them to form words.[/QUOTE]

Mine was never that good but OK.

I’m amazed with what I call calligraphy that some of our ancestors did with quill pens. Take the Constitution or Declaration of Independence for example.

I don’t have any of his writing but a great aunt showed me some of my great-great grandfathers writing she had. Absolutely amazing . Makes mine look like a first graders.


#47

Anyone still remember Pinball machines? I was never good but liked to play every now and then.

Found a good alternative. This video shows how you can build your own one. Could watch with IE9 and latest Firefox, but had issues with IE8 at work.


#48

[QUOTE=Liggy;2635095]Anyone still remember Pinball machines? I was never good but liked to play every now and then.

Found a good alternative. This video shows how you can build your own one. Could watch with IE9 and latest Firefox, but had issues with IE8 at work.[/QUOTE]

Love pinball machines foosball too. When I was real young I really liked the view finders. I’m sure I still would if I seen one again. I miss those old stereo “furniture” consoles.

I kind of miss boom boxes too.


#49

:bigsmile:


#50

Audio tapes.

Use a half-decent tape deck and they [I]can[/I] sound fantastic. I got a Yamaha KX-690 a couple of years ago and even well used 20+ year old audiobooks from the library sound great (in some ways better than CD). :cool:


#51

[QUOTE=Ibex;2635289]Audio tapes.

Use a half-decent tape deck and they [I]can[/I] sound fantastic. I got a Yamaha KX-690 a couple of years ago and even well used 20+ year old audiobooks from the library sound great (in some ways better than CD). :cool:[/QUOTE]

What I love to do is record Cd’s to tape. It just sounds right to me adds some organic mojo or something.


#52

[QUOTE=Wombler;2632798]Probably because of the lack of battery replacements as well.

The original one lasted me about ten years! :slight_smile:

[B]Wombler[/B][/QUOTE]

I found something :slight_smile:


#53

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2635377]I found something :)[/QUOTE]

That’s a non-rechargeable battery so the solar panel only supplements a normal battery and makes it last a bit longer.

The funny thing is I saw that Casio watch when I was on holiday last week.

I actually managed to find an advert for the watch I had and it was actually slightly earlier than I thought.

1979!

My brother and I both bought the silver version.

[B]Wombler[/B]



#54

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2632640]Why didn’t you keep it then? I’ve had 7 of them and sold them all to buy a 360 and a wii.[/QUOTE]

Oh, I kept them. I still have 2. Just a little more difficult to find now.


#55

what outdated technology will you miss?

I miss computers, real computers that is. The sort where satisfaction comes from having persuaded the machine do something… anything… :iagree:

Some of you will be thinking so what?, but others will know what I mean. :wink:

Like freeing up that last impossible 2Kb of base memory so your new computer game would actually run. This could take many days of fiddling, but the sense of achievement when you finally succeeded was greater than you would ever get from actually completing the game 6 hours later. Then you probably had to change everything back when you needed to run something else, which was great! Now you had to try and free up 632Kb out of 640Kb of base memory without leaving out [I]anything[/I] (especially not that 20Kb mouse driver).

These were the days when the closest we got to ‘plug & play’ was finding a graphics card with (joy of joys) dip switches on the backplate, so you no longer had to keep opening up the case and pulling the card out just to change the jumpers. And of course all these problems had to be worked out alone, there was no internet to go to looking for help.

But best of all was actually managing to do something productive on a computer. To begin with just printing a page of text you’d spent hours typing was an achievement. With Wordwise on the BBC Micro press the wrong function key and instead of printing, you’d lose everything without warning (the two keys were conveniently placed adjacent to each other). And if, for example, this happened at ten o’clock on a Sunday night and that piece of homework was due in first thing Monday morning, you’d have to start typing all over again from the begining. The output from a 9-pin Epson RX-80 may have been hideous, but that wasn’t the point - you’d actually produced something on the computer. :smiley:

Then you would go looking for new challenges every time you got your hands on a new piece of software. How about producing a piece of maths coursework in MathCAD just for the hell of it? Sure time was short and it would have been much quicker to write it by hand like everyone else, but that’s not the point. This was something you could do on the computer, which was much more fun. [I]You[/I] knew how much work it took to find a way to import those diagrams & combine everything with the text, even if nobody else did. ([I]And so what if you never actually finished it. Anyone could have handed in a completed piece of work, if they did it all by hand.[/I] :iagree::bigsmile:)

Alas those days are gone forever. :sad:


#56

Cable T.V. , but not the charges. Lol:grinning:


#57

I dumped the cable TV portion of our FIOS service and upped the connection speed to their gigabit tier level. The monthly bill went from $165 down to $100 and the internet speed is fantastic.


#58

Way to go!:slightly_smiling_face:


#59

Cassette recorders and possibly film cameras.

My brother has an audio cassette tape to digital converter, which converts a loaded tape to an MP3 file on an SD card. He was using it to convert stories and conversations with former grandparents and other people that passed away over the years. This got me thinking - Gone are the days where kids hid their cassette recorder secretly recording conversations with their grandparents, visitors, etc.

Film cameras had a few great features - You got a concise set of interesting prints and privacy. Now we don’t give a second thought to snapping away, sharing them and some people seem to get carried away taking selfies every couple of steps. Once we return home after an event, the pictures usually end up on a hard disk or cloud service that will probably not be viewed again after a few weeks. With film cameras, most people put the prints in photo albums. With just 24 or 36 pictures per event (maybe double for a holiday), looking back over last year’s photos was more enjoyable, unlike the 100s to 1000s most take now. As for privacy, you knew exactly who viewed your prints and who you gave copies to.

I’m sure in a few years we will be saying the same thing about physical paper, including newspapers. For example, gone will be all the kids creative drawings, greeting cards, etc. Anything electronic they draw will usually be deleted without giving a second thought to the future.


#60

Yeah! I still have my old Aiwa double cassette stereo. It plays the front and back of the cassette and you can record on it. Still works pretty good I bought in the early 1990’s. As far as phone cameras and selfies? Well what can I say while I still like cameras . There are lot’s of narcessitic people out there [ sorry for my spelling]:grinning: