What is your Internet connection speed?

vbimport

#403

I pay for 60mb/s down and 30mb/s up . This is what the cheaters give me


#404

[QUOTE=alan1476;2785703]I pay for 60mb/s down and 30mb/s up . This is what the cheaters give me

[/QUOTE]
What type of connection do you have? VDSL?


#405

Just got this upgrade on my cable service.


#406

Very Nice :iagree:


#407

[QUOTE=Ibex;2785704]What type of connection do you have? VDSL?[/QUOTE]

It actually a Cable connection from Optimum Online. VDSL is available but they advertise same upload and download speeds. I am a cheapskate, I only have the 39.99 a month package but its supposed to be 60 down and 30 up.


#408

Ah. With cable I guess they make their own rules.


#409

[QUOTE=Ibex;2785721]Ah. With cable I guess they make their own rules.[/QUOTE]

The VDSL coalition favors a line coding scheme based on Quadature Amplitude Modulation (QAM), a single-carrier system that is less expensive and consumes less power. They say its less expensive but I do not believe it, Very High Speed Digital Subscriber Line transmits data in the 13 Mbps - 55 Mbps range over short distances, usually between 1000 and 4500 feet (300 - 1500 meters), of twisted pair copper wire. The shorter the distance, the faster the connection rate. 13 to 55Mbps is not very fast to begin with and if you have to cover a large area it just is not suitable.


#410

Copper still has some life still left.
Max speed for FTTC here in the UK is 80mbps, although its capable of 100mbps, but capped at 80mbps. Max uplink speed for FTTC is 20mbps.

For ADSL you run a fibre cable to the telephone exchange and install a large DSLAM. You then rely on copper from the exchange to the house.

For FTTC, you build a FTTC street cabinet (usually close to the existing telephone street cabinet), and then run fibre from the exchange to that cabinet. Install a DSLAM in the street cabinet, then rely on copper from the street cabinet to the house.

The nest stage is G.Fast, which runs fibre to small nodes on telegraph poles, or underground nodes, then rely on copper from 10 meters to 300 meters to the house. Max speed for G.Fast is around 750mbps, but will initially be capped to 300mbps. G.Fast starts its commercial rollout in 2017.

The final stage will be FTTP.

All new homes in the UK must have FTTP now.


#411

Oh, nothing much :bigsmile:


#412

[QUOTE=Two Degrees;2785726]Oh, nothing much :bigsmile:

[/QUOTE]
FTTP I assume. Is that home or work?


#413

[QUOTE=Ibex;2785728]FTTP I assume. Is that home or work?[/QUOTE]

Home, believe it or not! Google Fiber came to the Atlanta metro area and all of a sudden AT&T and Comcast magically became able to provide gigabit internet at an affordable price :rolleyes:


#414

In this country, BT appears to have a policy when rolling out FTTP of avoiding business areas. It prefers to keep them on expensive leased lines.

The road where I live [S]is[/S] was, according to a study published about two years ago, the sixth slowest in the entire country.

Thinks improved substantially last year when the exchange was upgraded & a VDSL FTTC cabinet installed down one end of the village. (Surely a central location would be more logical? Most of the properties it serves are too far away to benefit.) But even neighbouring properties get wildly different speeds. About half a dozen properties are connected directly to the pole at the end of our driveway (so all virtually the same distance from the cabinet, about 500m away), but their estimated speeds for VDSL vary from >70Mbit down to barely 11Mbit, indicating that there is some really crappy cabling round here. Our medieval barn converted in the 50s is the highest by far (although we only pay for 37Mbit & get 40Mbit), the lowest appears to be the late 90s new build house opposite. :confused:

According to BT’s database we have FTTP available. If that is the case then it is only theoretical - no ISP appears to be offering the service. I suspect it is just BT gaming the system again (see above). The only reason our area was upgraded was because they received some public money to do so. By pretending to offer FTTP they no doubt received substantially more.


#415

[QUOTE=alan1476;2785703]I pay for 60mb/s down and 30mb/s up . This is what the cheaters give me
[/QUOTE]
If you hate your ISP that much… this educational material gives an overview of some interesting possibilities that are (theoretically) available. :wink: A bit out of date, but the principles should still apply.

//youtu.be/tEg09zSsfQo

//youtu.be/L-5B_vs0i3E


#416

[QUOTE=Two Degrees;2785726]Oh, nothing much :bigsmile:

[/QUOTE]

That is absolutely incredible! :eek:

I can only dream about speeds like that although I’d imagine there aren’t too many tasks that would max that out for long.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#417

[QUOTE=Wombler;2785745]That is absolutely incredible! :eek:

I can only dream about speeds like that although I’d imagine there aren’t too many tasks that would max that out for long.

[B]Wombler[/B][/QUOTE]

When I was in Kansas, they had Google Fibre and at that time Google was still experimenting with their gb/s lines. I had over 1000mb/s down and 1000mb/s up. The best part was that everyone in the area had it for free and when the testing was over all who participated got a 10 year free internet.


#418

[QUOTE=alan1476;2785751]When I was in Kansas, they had Google Fibre and at that time Google was still experimenting with their gb/s lines. I had over 1000mb/s down and 1000mb/s up. The best part was that everyone in the area had it for free and when the testing was over all who participated got a 10 year free internet.[/QUOTE]

Wow that’s crazy, and for free too! :eek:

I’d have been tempted not to move, LOL! :bigsmile:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#419

I’m in Bucharest, Romania, and i’m paying roughly 9 dollars for the service.


#420

[QUOTE=jeffy86able;2785901]

I’m in Bucharest, Romania, and i’m paying roughly 9 dollars for the service.[/QUOTE]

That’s amazing, and very cheap too! :cool:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#421

Yes, that’s one of the few things that are working properly in Romania.:bigsmile:


#422

I helped a work colleague set up his new fibre to the home installation, which is where the fibre cable terminates in the house. It connects to a small wall-mounted optical network terminal, followed by an Ethernet cable to the router.

The speeds available are 150Mbps, 300Mbps and 1Gbps. He went for the 150Mbps package, which itself is pretty impressive. The peering with the Eir network is impressive as I tried every speed test site I could think of and got 140-145Mbps with tests to the servers in Ireland and the UK.

A CD ISO image in 40 seconds - No problem… :wink: