What is your Internet connection speed?

vbimport

#303

[QUOTE=JReynolds;2688619]A new record for me, in rural West Sussex, England, a long long way from our exchange. I got a new router with a built in ADSL modem (a Netgear DGND 3700 v2) - this seems to have made a difference.

[/QUOTE]

That’s a nice improvement over your earlier speed. Like my experience above, it’s surprising the difference a better DSL router can make. :slight_smile:

One thing worth checking is if you can get the Three mobile network in your area, e.g. with a network search on your mobile to see if ‘3’ is listed. If you can, pick up a basic prepay broadband SIM to run some speed tests. 3G speeds tend to be better in out in the country where there is coverage, as obviously there is less congestion than in a built-up area. This speed test above was in a small town.

If the speed is reasonably good (e.g. >5Mb) and plays BBC iPlayer in HD, then it would give you another broadband option, e.g. change your mobile provider to 3 with one of their ‘All you can eat’ plans and use your phone as modem. This is what I do while out or if I need to do a big upload, as I typically get 1.5Mb uplink on the phone while in a 3G area compared to the 0.3Mb uplink on my home DSL.


#304

Yay

It’s getting faster -

Regds, JR


#305


#306

While with my parents on a journey home, I decided to run a few speedtests along the way. While going through a small village Glenties, this town sure has a fast connection or at least very few 3G users. I got about 7Mb, so figured I’ll retest just in case it went sporadic, only to get this, bearing in mind there’s no LTE or 4G around here yet and this network tends to be congested due to its 60GB and unlimited data plans.

A few days ago I decided to purchase a seedbox, which is basically hosted BitTorrent. Although I’m a light BitTorrent user, whenever I do need to get something, my tiny 384k uplink is chocked. Initially I was put off trying a seedbox as the majority of services charge €10+/month and are for private torrents only, which I have no intention of ever using. But with a quick look around, sure enough there are options for next to nothing, but obviously with a restricted upload and storage space. The one I went for is £9 for 6 months (KPH services cheapest option), came with 15GB of storage, a 1Mb uplink and public torrents allowed.

I threw a chucky 3.9GB PCLinuxOS distro in just to see what type of bandwidth I get. If only I could get this line to my house… :eek:

The SFTP download from the seedbox goes roughly 1.3MB/s on my work connection, so for now it’s a handy way of grabbing chunky files and then downloading them on my faster work connection by FTP.




#307

I’m back on cable. It’s nearly as slow as the first HFC cable connected to an external Motorola adapter I used in 1998. Its upload speed is about 30 times as slow as Korea Telecom’s FTTH, but the cable is built into the wall and the building owner pays for it. Download is up to about 10MB/s though. Since all three South Korean mobile service providers are introducing LTE-Advanced in this summer, I’ll be easy to compare speeds between HFC cable and LTE-A. Samsung’s Ativ-Q has 3200 by 1800 touch screen while running both Android and Windows 8. What I’m not yet sure of is its network part - whether it’ll have models with built-in LTE-A and 802.11ac.


#308

I upgraded my connection speed at home today. Not bad. High ping though:



#309

just checked mine…

I upgraded my service (along with a switch to Digital CATV (kinda required for my new TV(s)) in July and my provider had to install a new cable drop


#310

Mine is bad, 2.2 MB download and 0.85 MB upload.


#311

Anybody with Google Fiber?


#312

Ken, we’re hoping to get it sometime next summer (2014). Just my luck, we’ll be floating around the Adriatic when the tests are critical. Ah well… up in Kansas City, our pals there still don’t have it in their neighborhood, but they’re getting closer every month. They have gone to WiFi spots with it, and see the difference - even though everything’s “N” rated, they’re getting the top of that spectrum instead of mid-spectrum speeds.

Our town’s as spread out with different neighborhoods vying for “the first ones on the block” access, but Kansas City’s lengthy installation process is rather, well, sobering. I have a feeling I’ll remember what a 4-year-old feels when told she can’t go today, but will have to wait until next week. “Next week? Isn’t that, like, forever? So, NEVER?” I remember feeling like that myself, when I made such a comment to our son. Patience, patience, patience…

I wonder where the nearest volcano’s at? I’ll get a truckload of politicians and see if I can’t do some sacrifices and speed this thing up…


#313

If I were there, I’d simply move to one of the blocks with ready availability. A gigabit wired connection’s the best thing to have before upgrading to 802.11ac router. Does AC really provide 800Mbps wireless speed?

Strange, 100Mbps internet was available nearly everywhere in South Korea 10 years ago and it was not expensive (at 10 ~ 30 USD/month), but nobody’s offering Gbps while millions already have 802.11ac smartphones.


#314

Ken there have been a lot of apartment dwellers that did shuffle around in Kansas City. Some of those rents doubled or more, and for the apartment dwellers who were always there, they suddenly faced dire financial straits because “demand” let the landlords increase prices.

So much for Google’s ‘cheap’ fibre!

There were a lot of homeowners who couldn’t sell their property (since it was Non-Google-ized!) and had to stay where they first bought their homes. They simply couldn’t afford to buy a new home (suddenly with an increase in price, too) and keep their old ones.

We’ll see the same thing here in Austin, and everywhere, until Fibre is standardized.

Our best hopes is that our other existing ISPs will improve their cabling. They can afford to - just like Google can, and probably do it cheaper since they’ve got a built-in, existing, already-paying customer base. And they already have employees here.

But just like the Energy Companies, the ones who can afford to embrace new tech are the ones that turn their backs on it, hanging on to the last drop of economic lifeblood instead of jumping ahead of the bandwagon. It’s as cheap for Exxon to put up solar panels or wind turbines as any other company, and they could benefit so much more quickly. “But no, let’s drain the last drop of fossil fuel dollars. That’s what’s best for tomorrow’s bottom line. The Future may not arrive, after all.” Sheesh…

Well, maybe they’re right. I’ve seen two headlines screaming that the Earth will die in 1.7 billion years, and then another one is shouting that we have 2.2 billion years.

I wonder what the betting line is like on the Over/Under? Somehow, the phrase “I can’t wait to pick up my winnings!” doesn’t exactly bring any comfort.


#315

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2701517]Ken there have been a lot of apartment dwellers that did shuffle around in Kansas City. Some of those rents doubled or more, and for the apartment dwellers who were always there, they suddenly faced dire financial straits because “demand” let the landlords increase prices.[/QUOTE]

So that was a small revolution started by philanthropic Google. What a shame.


#316

Wireless is not a scratch on a wired connection. I’d take a 100Mb/s wired connection over a gigabit wifi connection, for anything that could take it. Wired is just more reliable, and consistent speed.

Obviously phones and tablets won’t use a wired connection, because it’s not practical (but is possible), and similarly for laptops.

The problem with wireless is that it is a shared medium. If one station is broadcasting, the others have to listen.

One nice feature of 802.11ac is that it can decouple the radio streams and communicate with different devices on different frequencies simultaneously, rather than talking to each device at full throttle and then moving to the next device.
Power saving abounds :wink:


#317

Somehow, most 802.11ac routers available at newegg.com seem to cost more than US$100. It’s strange as most popular 802.11ac routers in South Korea cost less than US$100. Typical high-end products with four 15cm antennas and four Gigabit ports cost about US$60 ~ $70. Typical low-end products with the cheaper Realtek chipset that offers half the maximum speed cost about US$30 ~ $40. Mediatek also makes 802.11ac chipsets.


#318

I am about 500ft from my router now in my basement.


#319

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2701505]Ken, we’re hoping to get it sometime next summer (2014). Just my luck, we’ll be floating around the Adriatic when the tests are critical. Ah well… up in Kansas City, our pals there still don’t have it in their neighborhood, but they’re getting closer every month. They have gone to WiFi spots with it, and see the difference - even though everything’s “N” rated, they’re getting the top of that spectrum instead of mid-spectrum speeds.

Our town’s as spread out with different neighborhoods vying for “the first ones on the block” access, but Kansas City’s lengthy installation process is rather, well, sobering. I have a feeling I’ll remember what a 4-year-old feels when told she can’t go today, but will have to wait until next week. “Next week? Isn’t that, like, forever? So, NEVER?” I remember feeling like that myself, when I made such a comment to our son. Patience, patience, patience…
[/QUOTE]

This is how I have felt about FIOS for the last 6-7 years. After all of my moves, there has only been one neighborhood that I have lived in that actually had FIOS as an option. Unfortunately my roommate didn’t want to have his house desecrated by a FIOS box on it. Not that I can blame him in retrospect, since he was thinking about selling it.


#320

Pretty decent, but then again, its 4:45pm on a Friday. I’m betting my numbers would be lower Sunday night…


#321

Home DSL speed.

Since getting the 3Mb to 5Mb upgrade a few months ago, it’s nice being able to watch 720p on YouTube, but my DSL link is less stable and drops the connection a few times each evening, quite annoying when chatting.

Last year, the Irish government announced it plans to get a minimum of 30Mb to every home including rural areas by 2015. Somehow, I don’t see that happening, at least not in our area… :disagree:


#322

While on the bus to Dublin airport, I noticed ‘4G’ appear on my phone’s screen as it approached Dublin.

The network is 3 Ireland, which only recently started its 4G service. I sure wouldn’t mind this as my home connection: :wink: