What is the maximum limit for DVD2ONE before quality suffers?

I’ve read differing opinions on the maximum acceptable movie length and/or file size for preserving quality. What is the practical cutoff point for DVD2one? I can’t tell the difference with movies 130 mins long with the director’s commentary but my TV is not the best.

Thanks

Ultimately, the limit is not determined by DVD2One, but by the quality of the original. A movie with an average bitrate of 7Mbits/sec is a better candidate for transcoding (without discernible loss) than a movie with an average bitrate of 4Mbits/sec. The second movie is already on thin ice; it won’t take much more jumping on before it cracks.

The other thing of course is your perception. If you can’t tell, it doesn’t matter whether I - or anyone else - can tell or not, does it? Remember too that viewing at normal viewing distances on a TV is not the same as using a magnifying glass on a hi-res computer screen, which I swear to God some users must do! The average TV masks a host of sins.

Just enjoy the movie, eh? :wink:

-Pete

I’ve wondered anyway why they always write “4,7 GB/120 min” on the DVD recordables. “120 min” means to me that a movie of 120 min length can fit on this medium. So how can it happen that 90% of the movies of the two-hours-class will NOT fit on 4,7 GB (or correctly speaking 4,36 GB)? How do the manufaturers calculate these 120 min?

Originally posted by RealMulder
I’ve wondered anyway why they always write “4,7 GB/120 min” on the DVD recordables. “120 min” means to me that a movie of 120 min length can fit on this medium. So how can it happen that 90% of the movies of the two-hours-class will NOT fit on 4,7 GB (or correctly speaking 4,36 GB)? How do the manufaturers calculate these 120 min?

They calculate these as they have since beta tapes. This is purely a scale for dedicated recorders. if you go out and buy a brand new digital vid cam, you can record onto dvd-r and thats where the 120 min video comes into play. if you record a dvd-r with sp (standard recording. not the best picture but damn close) you can get 120 mins video recording time, give or take a few minutes depending on the dvd-r media. If your not using a new Video recording device dedicated to video recording then the 120 minutes video means absolutly nothing.

Originally posted by RealMulder
I’ve wondered anyway why they always write “4,7 GB/120 min” on the DVD recordables. “120 min” means to me that a movie of 120 min length can fit on this medium. So how can it happen that 90% of the movies of the two-hours-class will NOT fit on 4,7 GB (or correctly speaking 4,36 GB)? How do the manufaturers calculate these 120 min?

To expand on what EpyxZ said, you can fit more than 120 minutes onto a DVD-R if you change the recording time. There are 4 different times aside from SP. They are FINE, SP, LP, and EP.

FINE = High Quality Picture Mode = 60 minutes
SP = Standard Mode = 120 minutes
LP = 2X Mode = 240 minutes
EP = 3X Mode = 360 minutes

In addition, you have two recording modes: VR mode and Video mode. The differences are that (1) Video mode is meant to play back on a standard DVD player while VR mode is playable back on the recorder and (2) EP recording time is not possible in Video mode.

Think about your standard VHS tape - you can record between 2 - 6 hours on most tapes depending on your recording time settings.

As for the difference between 4.7 GB and 4.36 GB: This is the same situation with hard drives. Manufacturers of hard drives and DVD media refers to a GB (gigabyte) as 1,000 MB. For computers, a GB is actually 1,024 MB, since computers use binary math and 1 GB = 2 ^ 10 MB = 1,024 MB = 1,073,741,824 bytes.

Take 4.7 GB as quoted by the media manufacturer and do this:

4,700,000,000 / 1,073,741,824 = 4.377 GB

Keep in mind this is raw data capacity… take lead ins, lead outs, and other overhead when storing data and you can effectively store about 4.36 GB of data on the disc.

Phuocle:

Your notes were informative and welcome, but lose that ‘byline’ stuff about the Middle-East, will you? This isn’t a political forum.

Thanks.

-Pete

I’m afraid I have too disagree, in part, with what Peter said.
Of course it depends on the source material. But in my experience a very high source bitrate actually runs against how DVD2One seems to work.

I’d say the quality of a movie is determined by the bitrate AND the used algorithm/matrix. Using a high bitrate allows for an algorithm/matrix that can take advantage of the available bitrate.
DVD2One now tunes down the bitrate, but keeps the matrix. Now you’re feeding fewer data into the same matrix that isn’t optimized for this lower bitrate.

What I’m trying to say… :slight_smile:
It’s better if the source material has an atuned bitrate/matrix combination that will fit to the intended compression (e.g. 4500 -> 4000) than a bitrate/matrix combination where you almost have to half the bitrate (e.g. 7000 -> 4000).

This, of course, makes judging your project quite diffcult… Plus you have to consider that you may be able to strip out audio tracks ranging from 192kbit/s to 768kbit/s…

Hopefully DVD2One will sometime give some more information in this regard. What avg. bitrate has the source, how big will it be after all you want to strip is cut out and what percentage of compression is needed.