What filesystem to use when burning BD-R

vbimport

#1

I would like to burn my first Data BD-R and I’m not sure what file system to choose.

What are the benefits of one file system over other, I mean ISO and UDF.
I used to always burn my DVD’s as ISO:1999 with allowing more than 255 characters in path in Nero.

Now I installed ImgBurn and it is set by default to ISO 9660 + UDF and Mode 1 option. What are the benefits if this over just burning in ISO. Or just plain UDF.

What settings do you guys use when burning data on BD-R?


#2

I believe UDF 2.50+ is the ‘norm’ for the latest generation media (HD DVD/BD).

Being a data disc, it doesn’t matter too much though.

Just be aware that XP doesn’t support 2.50 and won’t be able to read what’s on the disc (without an extra little driver).

If in doubt, select all 3 (ISO9660, Joliet, UDF 1.02). That’ll give you the most readable disc possible.

UDF 2.50+ have new features that help with recovery should the disc get scratched. It keeps 2 tables of where everything is stored - one at the start of the disc and another at the end (well, after all the file data).

I certainly wouldn’t ONLY use ISO9660 (with relaxed restrictions), just use Joliet/UDF which were designed not to have them in the first place.


#3

Thanks for the reply. What about the data type? Is it better to select Mode 1 / 2048 or “Mode 2/Form 1/2352” ?


#4

Yes because Mode 1 is all you can write on DVD/HD DVD/BD :wink:


#5

So I can select ISO 9660 + Joliet + UDF without jeopardizing my directory depth or file name length compatibility?


#6

Well, unless you relax the restrictions, the names in the ISO9660 file system will get changed into the normal uppercase 8.3 format and you’ll get a prompt (which you can ignore) if you go beyond 8 directory levels.

That’s not a problem though because the OS will always read the ‘best’ file system.

So basically, everything will read the UDF one regardless.
You have Joliet as a fallback and ISO9660 as a fallback of that fallback!

If any files have their names changed in the ‘best’ file system, ImgBurn will mention it in the log… so just keep an eye on it if you’re worried.


#7

Perfect, thanks for the advice!


#8

For “classic” data BD-R I used ISO 9660 + Joliet, and when I have some 4+ GB files I choose UDF 1.50 just because of compatibility reasons (to be compatible with XP without need for extra driver).


#9

any 2013 updates on this?

okay, if I wanted to burn some mkvs/xvids on BD-Rs that were largely to be used on blu-ray players, should I choose UDF 2.50? I’m looking for maximum compatibility with various brands & models of set-top blu-ray players.

Does it matter if I choose all three file systems (Joliet, ISO9660 & UDF) with the UDF at 2.50? Will I lose the added benefit of the UDF2.5 because I added the other two file systems? Thanks. Please help.


#10

There’s no change to the recommendations above. Choosing all 3 is probably the best option.


#11

[QUOTE=Albert;2690057]There’s no change to the recommendations above. Choosing all 3 is probably the best option.[/QUOTE]

Is that all three with UDF 1.02 or 2.50? I’m looking for maximum set-top blu-ray player compatibility.


#12

For blu ray video, I’d use UDF 2.5.


#13

It’s the best choice for that. :wink:


#14

[QUOTE=LIGHTNING UK!;2540517]I believe UDF 2.50+ is the ‘norm’ for the latest generation media (HD DVD/BD).

Being a data disc, it doesn’t matter too much though.

Just be aware that XP doesn’t support 2.50 and won’t be able to read what’s on the disc (without an extra little driver).

If in doubt, select all 3 (ISO9660, Joliet, UDF 1.02). That’ll give you the most readable disc possible.

UDF 2.50+ have new features that help with recovery should the disc get scratched. It keeps 2 tables of where everything is stored - one at the start of the disc and another at the end (well, after all the file data).

I certainly wouldn’t ONLY use ISO9660 (with relaxed restrictions), just use Joliet/UDF which were designed not to have them in the first place.[/QUOTE]

Hello lightening UK.
First of all i want to say imgburn is the best program ever.
Second i was wondering for Blu ray data disc if its wise to use UDF 2.50 + ISO + Joliet ?
Or if you take all three should i use UDF 1.02 instead ?
I also read on many sites UDF 2.60 is mostly used in camera recorders like Avchd recording since UDF 2.60 allows to add more data at a later time so my wild guess for a write once blu ray data disc plan 2.50 will be my best bet right ?
And is it a problem to burn UDF 2.50 + ISO + Joliet or is that a good idea so older systems that cant read udf 2.50 can fall back on the Iso or Joliet part ?


#15

LUK replied to you in your thread here: http://club.myce.com/f153/bd-r-data-disc-udf-2-50-vs-udf-2-60-a-338355/#post2747775

Please don’t cross post :wink: