What Exactly is the purpose of Verifying Data?

vbimport

#1

Hi guys. I ran a search, but couldn’t find the answer I’m looking for. Perhaps I used some poor keyword choices.

Anyways, my question is: What is the purpose of verifying data after it is burned to CD?

I understand that there may be some needs or concerns to have the copy be identical to the original, but say for media (movies, music, etc.) should this be a concern? The reason I ask is because I’ve burned some data CD’s and they fail the verification, but are still useable (readable) files. Before I delete these files from my hard drive, I would like to know if it’s a good idea to try and burn “better” copies of my data.

Thanks guys for your help!


#2

In the first place it is of course a check to see that the writer actually did its job ok.

But afterwards it may be so , that you used the wrong profile or schematic to write the cd. For instance , if the cd contained long filenames and you used a standard ISO profile to write it, all the filenames are truncated. This is an error as well.

Only veryfiying will make sure that the cd-r is written succesfully. An option i miss in CloneCD sadly.


#3

Originally posted by Mr. Belvedere
For instance , if the cd contained long filenames and you used a standard ISO profile to write it, all the filenames are truncated. This is an error as well.

As far as i know Nero warns you about such beginner mistakes prior to recording :wink:


#4

I admit it does tell me in the preview windows :o :o

But i’m more of a “clickety-click-click and burn baby !” person :slight_smile:


#5

i think file verification is more of a file integrity type of check, such as to check against CRC/checksum errors and make sure the burned files match the files on ur hard drive bit for bit to prevent data corruption. the files u burned might be “useable,” but it’s conceivable there may be problems later on. also, failing file verification could point to corruption problems going on, such as possibly a faulty ide cable or something.