What best option for store my important files for many years?

vbimport

#1

CD, DVD, Bluray, USB Flash Drive, Micro SD Card which is the best option, more reliable and safe to store my important files for many years?


#2

The answer is yes. Or no, depending on how you want to approach it.

Yes, any of these can be used. No, none of them should be used exclusively.
By they way, you forgot regular hard drives or SSD’s.

Use different types of storage for important data. Put them on different brands of media (for optical discs that means Taiyo Yuden, Verbatim and FTI/Falcon). By diversifying your storage methods, you minimize the risks of complete failure due to flaws in any one type of media.

This is the best answer you’re going to get since our digital storage methods are all capable of failing. NO ONE can guarantee that any one type of storage will last. Not unless you are willing to carve out a bunch of stone tablets.


#3

Flash memory (SSDs, SD cards, etc.) should NOT be used to store backups, because it’ll lose data if not powered up on a regular basis.
Important files should be backup up on more than one kind of media. I’d suggest HDDs & DVD±Rs, and high quality BD-Rs. Regarding optical media it’s required to check them on a regular basis to be able to copy files to new media if the old ones start to fail.
CDs aren’t recommended because their reflective layer can be (too easily) damaged.


#4

If handled and stored properly, CD’s are perfectly fine for archival use. In fact, many would argue that due to the larger lands and pits, they tend to be more stable and less likely to have disc rot.

As for flash memory…I wouldn’t choose it as a storage medium right now either, but that may change as new tech reaches the consumer. Also, long term storage using flash depends quite a lot on the type of memory used. As Anandtech pointed out, you could probably store data for up to ten years on a brand new MLC based SSD without power. It would be a colossal waste of money however, and I suspect optical media would outlast it.


#5

I will not constantly energize the flash memory, at least once a year

hdd is too unstable to have mechanical parts and need to be constantly energized

I already had CDs that were stored in the same location as the dvds and they died but the dvds are 100% good

between dvd and blu-ray which is the most reliable and tougher to keep my files?


#6

What type of CD were you using? I’ll bet they were not Taiyo Yuden. I can’t remember one TY CD that has failed for me over the last twenty years.

No one can answer your question on DVD’s vs Blu-ray. There isn’t long term data for Blu-ray. I doubt anyone around here has been burning them for ten years. I know my own only date back to 2008.


#7

CD-R Smartbuy Prodisc

dvdr is philips


#8

And there you have one of the basic problems with optical media. You have to know which types to use, and this knowledge changes over the years, as certain brands change sources and even some manufacturers are less than consistent in their quality control.


#9

You’re talking about degrees of unreliability, not “which is more reliable”. They are all unreliable, which is why you must use more than one type and in more than one location.

Neither HDD nor SSD needs to be powered on to retain data, in fact they are far more unreliable if powered on and connected to a PC. Cloud storage is another modern option and perfectly reasonable as long as its not your only backup.

I’d suggest 2 hard copies stored in different locations plus a cloud storage copy. Its an open question whether BD or DVD or CD burners will still be available in a few years, so consider that too.

I would give DVD a small edge for reliability over BD simply because BD is very susceptible to minor physical damage.


#10

[QUOTE=CDan;2775224]You’re talking about degrees of unreliability, not “which is more reliable”. They are all unreliable, which is why you must use more than one type and in more than one location.

Neither HDD nor SSD needs to be powered on to retain data, in fact they are far more unreliable if powered on and connected to a PC. Cloud storage is another modern option and perfectly reasonable as long as its not your only backup.

I’d suggest 2 hard copies stored in different locations plus a cloud storage copy. Its an open question whether BD or DVD or CD burners will still be available in a few years, so consider that too.

I would give DVD a small edge for reliability over BD simply because BD is very susceptible to minor physical damage.[/QUOTE]
Flash memory used in SSDs will lose data if not used on a regular basis, i.e. SSDs should NOT be used to store backups and put them away for years.


#11

Have you considered using M-Disk. They have gotten reasonably priced recently, even for the blu-rays. http://www.mdisc.com/mdisc-technology/


#12

Samsung 840 EVO SSD drive experienced widespread slow-down problems and when the issue was investigated, the cause was determined to be charge leakage from the NAND cells.

Upon write, the NAND cell is charged to a particular voltage level, each level corresponding to a state. With basic SLC there are only two states, high and low. But with MLC and TLC, many more possible states are used to increase data density.

Over time the voltage leaks from the gate, making it hard to tell which state it is supposed to be.

This was the problem with the 840 EVO. The voltage of previously written cells had degraded in just a few weeks - the data was not yet lost but multiple re-reads and error correction were required to determine the correct contents of older sectors. This was perceived by the user as massive slow down on older data.

Remember this was just a few weeks. I will wager the data would be entirely corrupt in 1-2 years. So I would not use a SSD for long-term archival, definitely not a TLC model. MLC is slightly better but I would still be wary about retention after several years. SLC will last a very long time but these are rare and expensive now.


#13

How many GB of data do you have to store? No one mentions about tapes. It’s fast and reliable/robust technology.