WD introduces 8TB Helium filled consumer HDDs

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: WD introduces 8TB Helium filled consumer HDDs[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2016/03/wd-helioseal-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

WD today announced its 8TB consumer HDDs. To achieve such a large capacity the disks are filled with Helium in order to reduce internal resistance.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/wd-introduces-8gb-consumer-hdds-78758/](http://www.myce.com/news/wd-introduces-8gb-consumer-hdds-78758/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

The WD Red and WD Purple are available at $345.
This will not sell…

Newegg has the Seagate 8tb v2 for 222$$ and if they can’t get WD to those prices they will not sell those drives…


#3

That’s an awful lot of eggs to put in one basket. :iagree::stuck_out_tongue:

Picks up a pack of Infomedia BD-R and gives it a hug


#4

Do they float?
Do they make you talk funny?


#5

[QUOTE=CDan;2769392]Do they float?[/QUOTE]
Depends…

In air - no.
In water - probably not.
In molten lead - sounds promising, give it a go. :iagree:

[QUOTE=CDan;2769392]Do they make you talk funny?[/QUOTE]
Absolutely. Sooner or later.

Losing 8TB of valuable data (or cat videos) is likely to have an adverse affect on one’s speech & diction. :stuck_out_tongue:


#6

8TB is a lot of eggs without a doubt. I would talk funny without laughing if I had one of those go FUBAR.
Thanks Guys for the good laugh this morning, I feel a lot less depressed now. :smiley:


#7

To those concerned about failure, you realise these are the Red and Purple lines right? They’re not as failure prone as your typical desktop drives.

Red is for NAS. Use RAID and have a spare disk on hand.
Purple is for surveillance. 99% chance there’ll be nothing of value on the disk when it fails. For the 1%, pay for the recovery or let it slide. If it’s vital to an investigation, give the busted disk to the cops and let them deal with it.

Both use cases are for live systems, not for archives. Convenience and availability, not permanence. For archives, use optical or smaller offline HDDs. Have a minimum of two copies.

If you insist on using NAS as an archive, back it up to tape and never discard or overwrite an old tape unless you’re absolutely certain that everything on it is also on another tape. That’s hard work, so just keep proper archives and replace lost/corrupted files from that.


#8

[QUOTE=Ibex;2769382]That’s an awful lot of eggs to put in one basket. :iagree::stuck_out_tongue:

Picks up a pack of Infomedia BD-R and gives it a hug[/QUOTE]Far better then have 3-3tb WD when you can have 1 8tb alot less weight and heat output.

[QUOTE=JimPBish;2769432]To those concerned about failure, you realise these are the Red and Purple lines right? They’re not as failure prone as your typical desktop drives.[/QUOTE]They are primary storage and not for the main Drive that should be a SSD.

[QUOTE=JimPBish;2769432]Red is for NAS. Use RAID and have a spare disk on hand.
Purple is for surveillance. 99% chance there’ll be nothing of value on the disk when it fails. For the 1%, pay for the recovery or let it slide. If it’s vital to an investigation, give the busted disk to the cops and let them deal with it.[/QUOTE]Stay up to late??

[QUOTE=JimPBish;2769432]Both use cases are for live systems, not for archives. Convenience and availability, not permanence. For archives, use optical or smaller offline HDDs. Have a minimum of two copies.[/QUOTE]LOL…with the amount of data/files nowdays your optical or smaller HDD will not hold those data.

[QUOTE=JimPBish;2769432]If you insist on using NAS as an archive, back it up to tape and never discard or overwrite an old tape unless you’re absolutely certain that everything on it is also on another tape. That’s hard work, so just keep proper archives and replace lost/corrupted files from that.[/QUOTE]TAPE yea right this backward thinking is so old why not use SSD or Optical at least OD won’t corrupt. Tape don’t make me go there.


#9

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2769433]Stay up to late??[/QUOTE]

Have now!

your optical or smaller HDD will not hold those data.

An HDD smalller than 8TB can be 4 or even 6 TB. If you have files larger than that you’re in the wrong place if you don’t already have a method of archiving them.

TAPE yea right this backward thinking is so old

It was an almost-joke to highlight the stupidity of using NAS as an archive. If anyone genuinely thinks NAS is an archive, they had better back it up and tape is the only thing that can hold that much in a single volume.


#10

[QUOTE=JimPBish;2769432]To those concerned about failure, you realise these are the Red and Purple lines right?[/QUOTE]
Yes, but they’re still HDDs. :wink:

[QUOTE=JimPBish;2769432]
They’re not as failure prone as your typical desktop drives.
[/QUOTE]
:disagree:

They’re [I][U]marketed[/U][/I] as such. Only time will tell. :wink:

Those with long enough memories will remember the dramatic fall from grace of IBM in the HDD market ~15 years ago. For years they occupied the pinnacle of the HDD market, until their peerless reputation for high-performance & reliability was shattered irrevocably and they sold the business to Hitachi.

A fault with a single model led to their entire Deskstar range being popularly re-branded as ‘[I]Deathstar[/I]’. The fault was fixed, but it had already dealt a mortal blow to their reputation.

Around the same time loyal enterprise customers, who for years were buying the high-end SCSI Ultrastar drives by the dozen, had an epiphany. Their Quantum Atlas drives were consistently outlasting the Ultrastars by years and rarely needed returning under warranty.


#11

[QUOTE=Ibex;2769450]Yes, but they’re still HDDs. :wink:

:disagree:

They’re [I][U]marketed[/U][/I] as such. Only time will tell. :wink:

Those with long enough memories will remember the dramatic fall from grace of IBM in the HDD market ~15 years ago. For years they occupied the pinnacle of the HDD market, until their peerless reputation for high-performance & reliability was shattered irrevocably and they sold the business to Hitachi.

A fault with a single model led to their entire Deskstar range being popularly re-branded as ‘[I]Deathstar[/I]’. The fault was fixed, but it had already dealt a mortal blow to their reputation.

Around the same time loyal enterprise customers, who for years were buying the high-end SCSI Ultrastar drives by the dozen, had an epiphany. Their Quantum Atlas drives were consistently outlasting the Ultrastars by years and rarely needed returning under warranty.[/QUOTE]

Remember all to well, still think I have a working 20GB Deathstar somewhere :slight_smile: Now, Quantum Atlas :bow:


#12

I for one will invest in the 8tb Seagate just because of the price and storage…unless WD can bring that price down to Seagate prices right now then I will consider them.