WAV file size reduction and Burning to CD

I discovered to my delight today that it is possible, using Sony Sound Forge, using “save AS” a wav file using different bit rates etc which reduce the size of the wav immensely with only a marginal reduction in quality, in the case of spoken rather than music rendition. By a factor of one fifth.
Unfortunetely, when I try to pack these many small wav files onto a CD, Nero and others reject them claiming that the TIME length is over 80 minutes, even tho the SIZE is way under the maximum allowable for a CD of 700 or 737 meg.
Is there a way around this?
Thanks
Rollo

Not if you want to play it on a CD Audio player. A lot of CD players can play MP3 and if yours can you can burn MP3 files as data and get the full 700 MB on a CD.

Thank you Oly Teddy for your reply.

Just so I may understand more fully, can I ask you to confirm that CD burners and even Cd players interpret their worlld in terms of time allocation even tho my CD player can indeed read an mp3- CD with 10 hours of TIME worth of audio on it. Some kind of paradox here it seems.
Rollo

[QUOTE=olyteddy;1967370]Not if you want to play it on a CD Audio player. A lot of CD players can play MP3 and if yours can you can burn MP3 files as data and get the full 700 MB on a CD.[/QUOTE]

‘Audio CD’ is always uncompressed WAV audio. That’s why 700 MB of it is only 80 minutes. MP3 audio on the other hand is compressed, using less space per minute. MP3 is not CD Audio, that’s why if your player can play it you can put a lot more ‘time’ of it on a disk.

Thanks once again Oly Teddy

At the risk of wearing out my welcome here I will venture this: I completely accept your statement below about
"‘Audio CD’ is always uncompressed WAV audio. That’s why 700 MB of it is only 80 minutes. "

Yet what doesn’t jell is if I have reduced a wav file to a smaller size 8 bit 8000Khz Mono wav file, rather the previous higher quality 44000 Khz 16 bit stereo, and it is one fifth the size of the higher quality file- it is not thereby compressed, as you point out- only smaller.

Therefore the governing issue must be that “Audio CD” is structured around minutes of time, not size, or even (non)compression .

That’s why I haven’t been able to ‘trick’ Nero to burn it for me.

Would that make sense to you?

Thanks, I am gratefful to have someone to kick this around with,
Rollo

[QUOTE=olyteddy;1968007]

‘Audio CD’ is always uncompressed WAV audio. That’s why 700 MB of it is only 80 minutes.

MP3 audio on the other hand is compressed, using less space per minute. MP3 is not CD Audio, that’s why if your player can play it you can put a lot more ‘time’ of it on a disk.[/QUOTE]

[quote=RolloB;1968047]Thanks once again Oly Teddy

At the risk of wearing out my welcome here I will venture this: I completely accept your statement below about
"‘Audio CD’ is always uncompressed WAV audio. That’s why 700 MB of it is only 80 minutes. "

Yet what doesn’t jell is if I have reduced a wav file to a smaller size 8 bit 8000Khz Mono wav file, rather the previous higher quality 44000 Khz 16 bit stereo, and it is one fifth the size of the higher quality file- it is not thereby compressed, as you point out- only smaller.

Therefore the governing issue must be that “Audio CD” is structured around minutes of time, not size, or even (non)compression .

That’s why I haven’t been able to ‘trick’ Nero to burn it for me.

Would that make sense to you?

Thanks, I am gratefful to have someone to kick this around with,
Rollo[/quote]

:rolleyes:
I am not claiming to have the answer, but I have been similarly frustrated when trying to burn low quality voice recordings onto CD. I can only assume that the format on the audio CD is always the same - high quality stereo - regardless of the original source. So low quality stuff get “upconverted” whether you like it or not. Again, this is just my assumption.

[B]An AudioCD or CDDA only accepts audio in the format 16bit stereo 44100 Hz.[/B]

Thank you Gentlemen for your assistance in helping me understand the problem
Rollo