Video Rumours that Antivirus companies have

AV detect all software’s that help you register apps at no cost…
( I DO NOT ENCOURAGE THIS!!!) it’s stealing!..:cop:

The AV companies motive is quite clear…:iagree:

Unfortunately some of us may not know what on earth you are talking about. :frowning:

[QUOTE=imkidd57;2213262]Unfortunately some of us may not know what on earth you are talking about. :([/QUOTE]

Include me in this group.

[QUOTE=UTR;2213332]Include me in this group.[/QUOTE]

Keygens…:flower:

How about eschewing the abbreviations and jargonism so that wveryone knows what you are talking about

I think I have it puzzled it out, but it wasn’t exactly easy.

And still not “Clear”

Be SPECIFIC.

WHAT Anti-Virus software?

AD

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2216219]How about eschewing the abbreviations and jargonism so that wveryone knows what you are talking about

I think I have it puzzled it out, but it wasn’t exactly easy.

And still not “Clear”

Be SPECIFIC.

WHAT Anti-Virus software?

AD[/QUOTE]
all of them…peace…:flower: they all share the same code…:wink:

As an old duffer this is as cleat as mud even now!!
Please spell out what you are trying to say.
If you had a really good night out, wait until the alcoholic haze disperses.:bigsmile:

I think what he is trying to say is that the anti-virus companies have recently begun adding key generators, cracks, offline activators and other ways of getting around paying for software to their list of “virus” signatures. For example, I have a friend whose AV software recently detected a “virus”. She called me to have a look. What it had detected was a key generator for Winzip from the folks at TSRh. This file had been on her computer for over 4 years and had never been “detected” by the AV software before.

[QUOTE=Icy Mt.;2216506]I think what he is trying to say is that the anti-virus companies have recently begun adding key generators, cracks, offline activators and other ways of getting around paying for software to their list of “virus” signatures. For example, I have a friend whose AV software recently detected a “virus”. She called me to have a look. What it had detected was a key generator for Winzip from the folks at TSRh. This file had been on her computer for over 4 years and had never been “detected” by the AV software before.[/QUOTE]
Truer words were never spoken…:clap: The anti virus companies not only
protect you from viruses that can damage ur pc but, also protect you from using cracks & keygens to steal software (you didn’t know any better because your antivirus said so…:sad:.)…:cop: thats why there are so many people [B]reporting [/B]cracks & keygens as trojan horse programs because…
the antivirus companies don’t want you to steal…:iagree: America sure
has a brilliant future ahead…:cool: The Antivirus companies lose serious profit margins with keygens & cracks so, they [B][U]have[/U][/B] to do this.

At least you’ll know where you left them.

Kaspersky does this as well, it’s under malicious programs or something like that. It does have a switch box so I just turned it off. I thought I had some viruses at first when I ran it as all the features are turned on by default;).
You should be able to custom configure any anti virus program, some just bury things so it’s not obvious what to do.
I’d guess they do this a much for businesses that don’t want anything that might cause them trouble.

Kind’ve ironic, Kapersky just getting hacked and loosing all that info. They should worry about protecting their customers data.

Thank you every one my haze has dispersed and I understand now.
I’m off for a single malt now.

Anti-virus Companies have been progressively doing this for the last 4 years. A side note for ya, watch very carefully what your Anti-virus program is calling a Virus because there have been instances where legit program files are being called Viruses and they are not.

:cool::cool:

I knew exactly what he meant, AVG has been doing it since the release of version 8. Not only that they seem to indiscriminately do the same with any .exe file that is smaller than 150-200kb in size.

Unless they are actually hostile, calling them a Virus is inaccuarate, and would show questionable integrity.

It would be correct to call them “potentially unwanted programs”, as they could be used to violate policy - the same categorization tends to be used for Keyfinders and keyloggers as well as serverless mail senders.

To my knowledge, keygens contain strings of code similar to that of malicious software.

If you use keygens frequently, you will find out that some of them contain strings of code that are [I]exactly [/I]like that of malicious software:doh:

BTW, if I worked for, say, Roxio, I would think that a few hundred bucks shelled out to the AV companies (in order to get the strings of code from the various keygens and cracks I’ve found on teh interwebs listed as virii) would be a good investment.

They don’t just get keygens they take out any small file.
I had a folder full of small programs I had written, Not one was a keygen or anything malicious they were small card games and so on, The folder had at least 1000 files in it all below 100Kb AVG nailed them all.

BTW: keygens contain bugger all code all they do is generate a number based on the algorithm used for the game/program serial and that’s it, The only code that would be the same would be the same in every program and that’s just the inclusion of dialog boxes and windows

[QUOTE=slayerking;2231842]BTW: keygens contain bugger all code all they do is generate a number based on the algorithm used for the game/program serial and that’s it, The only code that would be the same would be the same in every program and that’s just the inclusion of dialog boxes and windows[/QUOTE]What I was implying is that I have found that key generators tend to have a higher rate of virus infection (deliberate or not) than, say, the ImgBurn installer.