Video On Demand Internet streaming is hurting the DVD business

Video On Demand Internet streaming is hurting the DVD business.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2010/12/zlvyDA.jpg[/newsimage]Redbox put Blockbuster under immediate pressure as the daily kiosk rental service exploded in popularity, but rental kiosks now have their own fight to deal with.  Research group In-Stat believes digital movie revenue will dramatically increase through 2014, with Redbox and other services struggling to keep up with streaming services.


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/video-on-demand-internet-streaming-is-hurting-the-dvd-business-37663/](http://www.myce.com/news/video-on-demand-internet-streaming-is-hurting-the-dvd-business-37663/)


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These predictions always ignore the 300# gorilla in the room, which is the ISPs and their planned tiered bandwidth service charges. Until that gets sorted out, nothing is certain.

CDan beat me to it. My ISP limits my unlimited plan, so as a movie and PC gaming addict, I rent the really good movies on DVD. I couldn’t imagine streaming higher quality (1080p), Comcast would drop me like a rock! As it is I don’t even stream Netflix in HD! I have 2 sons and their friends as well as myself who download games, stream music, movies, etc. DVD/Blu-Ray rentals aren’t going anywhere soon.

A very close friend of mine owns the only video rental store in my town, he said he “sees the writing on the wall”, as to the viability of his business. He wonders why he is not allowed to buy one movie and rent it out either by loading it onto various media ( and paying a fee to the companies). Why does he have to buy multiple copies of movies while Netflix and other companies can just stream the copy they have. It would be interesting if they let small rental places stream out movies by putting them on SD cards or some other sort of medium and compete with the “big boys”. The inventory of the small rental shop would decrease drastically and a lot of space would be regained. The other result would be a much “greener” business as far less plastic would be used in this scenario.

Netflix will be in real trouble if the majority of US ISP’s move to tiered bandwidth plans. Let’s hope that doesn’t happen…

[QUOTE=Blu-rayFreak;2563094]Netflix will be in real trouble if the majority of US ISP’s move to tiered bandwidth plans. Let’s hope that doesn’t happen…[/QUOTE]Most of Oz has tiered internet plans.
Most of the reputable ISP’s have “unmetered bandwidth” deals with various video streaming mobs.

But it means that if you are with one ISP, and they have a deal with a certain streaming mob, you can’t change your streaming mob without changing your ISP.

I understand that in the USA, 4Mb/s is classified as the minimum speed requirement to be classified as broadband, and 90% (I think) doesn’t satisfy that broadband definition … so anyone thinking to bypass the 1 week delay from a scratched DVD might be waiting an entire week for the movie to download anyway :wink:

If you have a great internet conncection, streaming 1080p videos still have its hiccups. I think streaming and direct download are being forced on the consumers more than anything else. The corporations want more control over their products. Went to Bestbuy recently and the dvd, blu-ray, and video games section has been downsized. Netflix is good for renting, but what is going to happen when you want to own a movie? You are going to have to pay $24.99 for a digital download that is not even as good as HD.